How Many People Work From Home? 62 Work From Home Productivity Statistics

by Roman Peysakhovich · December 30th, 2021

4.7 million people work remotely at least half the time in the USA.

If you're looking for remote work statistics, you've come to the right place.

Keep reading to find new remote work productivity stats and facts related to:

  • How many people work from home?
  • Does working from home increase productivity?
  • Working from home productivity post COVID
  • What percentage of jobs are work from home?
  • How much has remote work increased in 2020?
  • What percentage of workers want to work remotely?
  • Do companies save money with remote employees?
  • A whole lot more

Let’s see some stats and facts!

4.7 million people work remotely at least half the time in the USA.

If you're looking for remote work statistics, you've come to the right place.

Keep reading to find new remote work productivity stats and facts related to:

  • How many people work from home?
  • Does working from home increase productivity?
  • Working from home productivity post COVID
  • What percentage of jobs are work from home?
  • How much has remote work increased in 2020?
  • What percentage of workers want to work remotely?
  • Do companies save money with remote employees?
  • A whole lot more

Let’s see some stats and facts!

4.7 million people work remotely at least half the time in the USA.

If you're looking for remote work statistics, you've come to the right place.

Keep reading to find new remote work productivity stats and facts related to:

  • How many people work from home?
  • Does working from home increase productivity?
  • Working from home productivity post COVID
  • What percentage of jobs are work from home?
  • How much has remote work increased in 2020?
  • What percentage of workers want to work remotely?
  • Do companies save money with remote employees?
  • A whole lot more

Let’s see some stats and facts!

4.7 million people work remotely at least half the time in the USA.

If you're looking for remote work statistics, you've come to the right place.

Keep reading to find new remote work productivity stats and facts related to:

  • How many people work from home?
  • Does working from home increase productivity?
  • Working from home productivity post COVID
  • What percentage of jobs are work from home?
  • How much has remote work increased in 2020?
  • What percentage of workers want to work remotely?
  • Do companies save money with remote employees?
  • A whole lot more

Let’s see some stats and facts!

4.7 million people work remotely at least half the time in the USA.

If you're looking for remote work statistics, you've come to the right place.

Keep reading to find new remote work productivity stats and facts related to:

  • How many people work from home?
  • Does working from home increase productivity?
  • Working from home productivity post COVID
  • What percentage of jobs are work from home?
  • How much has remote work increased in 2020?
  • What percentage of workers want to work remotely?
  • Do companies save money with remote employees?
  • A whole lot more

Let’s see some stats and facts!

4.7 million people work remotely at least half the time in the USA.

If you're looking for remote work statistics, you've come to the right place.

Keep reading to find new remote work productivity stats and facts related to:

  • How many people work from home?
  • Does working from home increase productivity?
  • Working from home productivity post COVID
  • What percentage of jobs are work from home?
  • How much has remote work increased in 2020?
  • What percentage of workers want to work remotely?
  • Do companies save money with remote employees?
  • A whole lot more

Let’s see some stats and facts!

4.7 million people work remotely at least half the time in the USA.

If you're looking for remote work statistics, you've come to the right place.

Keep reading to find new remote work productivity stats and facts related to:

  • How many people work from home?
  • Does working from home increase productivity?
  • Working from home productivity post COVID
  • What percentage of jobs are work from home?
  • How much has remote work increased in 2020?
  • What percentage of workers want to work remotely?
  • Do companies save money with remote employees?
  • A whole lot more

Let’s see some stats and facts!

4.7 million people work remotely at least half the time in the USA.

If you're looking for remote work statistics, you've come to the right place.

Keep reading to find new remote work productivity stats and facts related to:

  • How many people work from home?
  • Does working from home increase productivity?
  • Working from home productivity post COVID
  • What percentage of jobs are work from home?
  • How much has remote work increased in 2020?
  • What percentage of workers want to work remotely?
  • Do companies save money with remote employees?
  • A whole lot more

Let’s see some stats and facts!

4.7 million people work remotely at least half the time in the USA.

If you're looking for remote work statistics, you've come to the right place.

Keep reading to find new remote work productivity stats and facts related to:

  • How many people work from home?
  • Does working from home increase productivity?
  • Working from home productivity post COVID
  • What percentage of jobs are work from home?
  • How much has remote work increased in 2020?
  • What percentage of workers want to work remotely?
  • Do companies save money with remote employees?
  • A whole lot more

Let’s see some stats and facts!

4.7 million people work remotely at least half the time in the USA.

If you're looking for remote work statistics, you've come to the right place.

Keep reading to find new remote work productivity stats and facts related to:

  • How many people work from home?
  • Does working from home increase productivity?
  • Working from home productivity post COVID
  • What percentage of jobs are work from home?
  • How much has remote work increased in 2020?
  • What percentage of workers want to work remotely?
  • Do companies save money with remote employees?
  • A whole lot more

Let’s see some stats and facts!

4.7 million people work remotely at least half the time in the USA.

If you're looking for remote work statistics, you've come to the right place.

Keep reading to find new remote work productivity stats and facts related to:

  • How many people work from home?
  • Does working from home increase productivity?
  • Working from home productivity post COVID
  • What percentage of jobs are work from home?
  • How much has remote work increased in 2020?
  • What percentage of workers want to work remotely?
  • Do companies save money with remote employees?
  • A whole lot more

Let’s see some stats and facts!

4.7 million people work remotely at least half the time in the USA.

If you're looking for remote work statistics, you've come to the right place.

Keep reading to find new remote work productivity stats and facts related to:

  • How many people work from home?
  • Does working from home increase productivity?
  • Working from home productivity post COVID
  • What percentage of jobs are work from home?
  • How much has remote work increased in 2020?
  • What percentage of workers want to work remotely?
  • Do companies save money with remote employees?
  • A whole lot more

Let’s see some stats and facts!

4.7 million people work remotely at least half the time in the USA.

If you're looking for remote work statistics, you've come to the right place.

Keep reading to find new remote work productivity stats and facts related to:

  • How many people work from home?
  • Does working from home increase productivity?
  • Working from home productivity post COVID
  • What percentage of jobs are work from home?
  • How much has remote work increased in 2020?
  • What percentage of workers want to work remotely?
  • Do companies save money with remote employees?
  • A whole lot more

Let’s see some stats and facts!

4.7 million people work remotely at least half the time in the USA.

If you're looking for remote work statistics, you've come to the right place.

Keep reading to find new remote work productivity stats and facts related to:

  • How many people work from home?
  • Does working from home increase productivity?
  • Working from home productivity post COVID
  • What percentage of jobs are work from home?
  • How much has remote work increased in 2020?
  • What percentage of workers want to work remotely?
  • Do companies save money with remote employees?
  • A whole lot more

Let’s see some stats and facts!

4.7 million people work remotely at least half the time in the USA.

If you're looking for remote work statistics, you've come to the right place.

Keep reading to find new remote work productivity stats and facts related to:

  • How many people work from home?
  • Does working from home increase productivity?
  • Working from home productivity post COVID
  • What percentage of jobs are work from home?
  • How much has remote work increased in 2020?
  • What percentage of workers want to work remotely?
  • Do companies save money with remote employees?
  • A whole lot more

Let’s see some stats and facts!

4.7 million people work remotely at least half the time in the USA.

If you're looking for remote work statistics, you've come to the right place.

Keep reading to find new remote work productivity stats and facts related to:

  • How many people work from home?
  • Does working from home increase productivity?
  • Working from home productivity post COVID
  • What percentage of jobs are work from home?
  • How much has remote work increased in 2020?
  • What percentage of workers want to work remotely?
  • Do companies save money with remote employees?
  • A whole lot more

Let’s see some stats and facts!

4.7 million people work remotely at least half the time in the USA.

If you're looking for remote work statistics, you've come to the right place.

Keep reading to find new remote work productivity stats and facts related to:

  • How many people work from home?
  • Does working from home increase productivity?
  • Working from home productivity post COVID
  • What percentage of jobs are work from home?
  • How much has remote work increased in 2020?
  • What percentage of workers want to work remotely?
  • Do companies save money with remote employees?
  • A whole lot more

Let’s see some stats and facts!

4.7 million people work remotely at least half the time in the USA.

If you're looking for remote work statistics, you've come to the right place.

Keep reading to find new remote work productivity stats and facts related to:

  • How many people work from home?
  • Does working from home increase productivity?
  • Working from home productivity post COVID
  • What percentage of jobs are work from home?
  • How much has remote work increased in 2020?
  • What percentage of workers want to work remotely?
  • Do companies save money with remote employees?
  • A whole lot more

Let’s see some stats and facts!

4.7 million people work remotely at least half the time in the USA.

If you're looking for remote work statistics, you've come to the right place.

Keep reading to find new remote work productivity stats and facts related to:

  • How many people work from home?
  • Does working from home increase productivity?
  • Working from home productivity post COVID
  • What percentage of jobs are work from home?
  • How much has remote work increased in 2020?
  • What percentage of workers want to work remotely?
  • Do companies save money with remote employees?
  • A whole lot more

Let’s see some stats and facts!

4.7 million people work remotely at least half the time in the USA.

If you're looking for remote work statistics, you've come to the right place.

Keep reading to find new remote work productivity stats and facts related to:

  • How many people work from home?
  • Does working from home increase productivity?
  • Working from home productivity post COVID
  • What percentage of jobs are work from home?
  • How much has remote work increased in 2020?
  • What percentage of workers want to work remotely?
  • Do companies save money with remote employees?
  • A whole lot more

Let’s see some stats and facts!

4.7 million people work remotely at least half the time in the USA.

If you're looking for remote work statistics, you've come to the right place.

Keep reading to find new remote work productivity stats and facts related to:

  • How many people work from home?
  • Does working from home increase productivity?
  • Working from home productivity post COVID
  • What percentage of jobs are work from home?
  • How much has remote work increased in 2020?
  • What percentage of workers want to work remotely?
  • Do companies save money with remote employees?
  • A whole lot more

Let’s see some stats and facts!

4.7 million people work remotely at least half the time in the USA.

If you're looking for remote work statistics, you've come to the right place.

Keep reading to find new remote work productivity stats and facts related to:

  • How many people work from home?
  • Does working from home increase productivity?
  • Working from home productivity post COVID
  • What percentage of jobs are work from home?
  • How much has remote work increased in 2020?
  • What percentage of workers want to work remotely?
  • Do companies save money with remote employees?
  • A whole lot more

Let’s see some stats and facts!

4.7 million people work remotely at least half the time in the USA.

If you're looking for remote work statistics, you've come to the right place.

Keep reading to find new remote work productivity stats and facts related to:

  • How many people work from home?
  • Does working from home increase productivity?
  • Working from home productivity post COVID
  • What percentage of jobs are work from home?
  • How much has remote work increased in 2020?
  • What percentage of workers want to work remotely?
  • Do companies save money with remote employees?
  • A whole lot more

Let’s see some stats and facts!

4.7 million people work remotely at least half the time in the USA.

If you're looking for remote work statistics, you've come to the right place.

Keep reading to find new remote work productivity stats and facts related to:

  • How many people work from home?
  • Does working from home increase productivity?
  • Working from home productivity post COVID
  • What percentage of jobs are work from home?
  • How much has remote work increased in 2020?
  • What percentage of workers want to work remotely?
  • Do companies save money with remote employees?
  • A whole lot more

Let’s see some stats and facts!

4.7 million people work remotely at least half the time in the USA.

If you're looking for remote work statistics, you've come to the right place.

Keep reading to find new remote work productivity stats and facts related to:

  • How many people work from home?
  • Does working from home increase productivity?
  • Working from home productivity post COVID
  • What percentage of jobs are work from home?
  • How much has remote work increased in 2020?
  • What percentage of workers want to work remotely?
  • Do companies save money with remote employees?
  • A whole lot more

Let’s see some stats and facts!

Key Work From Home Statistics:

  1. 4.7 million people work remotely at least half the time in the USA.
  2. 90% of employees say they were as productive or more working remotely when compared to the office in 2021.
  3. 16% of companies around the world are fully remote according to an Owl labs study.
  4. During the Coronavirus, almost 70% of full-time workers are working from home.
  5. Remote employees save an average of 40 minutes daily from commuting.
  6. Nearly 77% of all employees who work from home said that they experienced an increase in productivity when compared to working in an office.
  7. Working from home increased 44% since 2016, even before the COVID-19 pandemic.
  8. In 2021, working from home accounts for over 60% of the economy of the United States.
  9. In 2020, 50% of remote workers said they would not return to a job that did not offer a choice of working from home.
  10. Approximately 80% of all workers said they would reject a job offer that does not allow work from home and flexible hours.
  11. Employees said they were willing to make some sacrifices for the ability to work remotely, such as taking on a greater workload, giving up company benefits, or taking a pay cut.
  12. 80% of remote workers said they were happy with their job compared to only 55% of those in an office. traditional office setting.
  13. The main downsides to working at home were loneliness (19%) and the inability to “turn off” after work hours (22%).
  1. 4.7 million people work remotely at least half the time in the USA.
  2. 90% of employees say they were as productive or more working remotely when compared to the office in 2021.
  3. 16% of companies around the world are fully remote according to an Owl labs study.
  4. During the Coronavirus, almost 70% of full-time workers are working from home.
  5. Remote employees save an average of 40 minutes daily from commuting.
  6. Nearly 77% of all employees who work from home said that they experienced an increase in productivity when compared to working in an office.
  7. Working from home increased 44% since 2016, even before the COVID-19 pandemic.
  8. In 2021, working from home accounts for over 60% of the economy of the United States.
  9. In 2020, 50% of remote workers said they would not return to a job that did not offer a choice of working from home.
  10. Approximately 80% of all workers said they would reject a job offer that does not allow work from home and flexible hours.
  11. Employees said they were willing to make some sacrifices for the ability to work remotely, such as taking on a greater workload, giving up company benefits, or taking a pay cut.
  12. 80% of remote workers said they were happy with their job compared to only 55% of those in an office. traditional office setting.
  13. The main downsides to working at home were loneliness (19%) and the inability to “turn off” after work hours (22%).
  1. 4.7 million people work remotely at least half the time in the USA.
  2. 90% of employees say they were as productive or more working remotely when compared to the office in 2021.
  3. 16% of companies around the world are fully remote according to an Owl labs study.
  4. During the Coronavirus, almost 70% of full-time workers are working from home.
  5. Remote employees save an average of 40 minutes daily from commuting.
  6. Nearly 77% of all employees who work from home said that they experienced an increase in productivity when compared to working in an office.
  7. Working from home increased 44% since 2016, even before the COVID-19 pandemic.
  8. In 2021, working from home accounts for over 60% of the economy of the United States.
  9. In 2020, 50% of remote workers said they would not return to a job that did not offer a choice of working from home.
  10. Approximately 80% of all workers said they would reject a job offer that does not allow work from home and flexible hours.
  11. Employees said they were willing to make some sacrifices for the ability to work remotely, such as taking on a greater workload, giving up company benefits, or taking a pay cut.
  12. 80% of remote workers said they were happy with their job compared to only 55% of those in an office. traditional office setting.
  13. The main downsides to working at home were loneliness (19%) and the inability to “turn off” after work hours (22%).
  1. 4.7 million people work remotely at least half the time in the USA.
  2. 90% of employees say they were as productive or more working remotely when compared to the office in 2021.
  3. 16% of companies around the world are fully remote according to an Owl labs study.
  4. During the Coronavirus, almost 70% of full-time workers are working from home.
  5. Remote employees save an average of 40 minutes daily from commuting.
  6. Nearly 77% of all employees who work from home said that they experienced an increase in productivity when compared to working in an office.
  7. Working from home increased 44% since 2016, even before the COVID-19 pandemic.
  8. In 2021, working from home accounts for over 60% of the economy of the United States.
  9. In 2020, 50% of remote workers said they would not return to a job that did not offer a choice of working from home.
  10. Approximately 80% of all workers said they would reject a job offer that does not allow work from home and flexible hours.
  11. Employees said they were willing to make some sacrifices for the ability to work remotely, such as taking on a greater workload, giving up company benefits, or taking a pay cut.
  12. 80% of remote workers said they were happy with their job compared to only 55% of those in an office. traditional office setting.
  13. The main downsides to working at home were loneliness (19%) and the inability to “turn off” after work hours (22%).
  1. 4.7 million people work remotely at least half the time in the USA.
  2. 90% of employees say they were as productive or more working remotely when compared to the office in 2021.
  3. 16% of companies around the world are fully remote according to an Owl labs study.
  4. During the Coronavirus, almost 70% of full-time workers are working from home.
  5. Remote employees save an average of 40 minutes daily from commuting.
  6. Nearly 77% of all employees who work from home said that they experienced an increase in productivity when compared to working in an office.
  7. Working from home increased 44% since 2016, even before the COVID-19 pandemic.
  8. In 2021, working from home accounts for over 60% of the economy of the United States.
  9. In 2020, 50% of remote workers said they would not return to a job that did not offer a choice of working from home.
  10. Approximately 80% of all workers said they would reject a job offer that does not allow work from home and flexible hours.
  11. Employees said they were willing to make some sacrifices for the ability to work remotely, such as taking on a greater workload, giving up company benefits, or taking a pay cut.
  12. 80% of remote workers said they were happy with their job compared to only 55% of those in an office. traditional office setting.
  13. The main downsides to working at home were loneliness (19%) and the inability to “turn off” after work hours (22%).
  1. 4.7 million people work remotely at least half the time in the USA.
  2. 90% of employees say they were as productive or more working remotely when compared to the office in 2021.
  3. 16% of companies around the world are fully remote according to an Owl labs study.
  4. During the Coronavirus, almost 70% of full-time workers are working from home.
  5. Remote employees save an average of 40 minutes daily from commuting.
  6. Nearly 77% of all employees who work from home said that they experienced an increase in productivity when compared to working in an office.
  7. Working from home increased 44% since 2016, even before the COVID-19 pandemic.
  8. In 2021, working from home accounts for over 60% of the economy of the United States.
  9. In 2020, 50% of remote workers said they would not return to a job that did not offer a choice of working from home.
  10. Approximately 80% of all workers said they would reject a job offer that does not allow work from home and flexible hours.
  11. Employees said they were willing to make some sacrifices for the ability to work remotely, such as taking on a greater workload, giving up company benefits, or taking a pay cut.
  12. 80% of remote workers said they were happy with their job compared to only 55% of those in an office. traditional office setting.
  13. The main downsides to working at home were loneliness (19%) and the inability to “turn off” after work hours (22%).
  1. 4.7 million people work remotely at least half the time in the USA.
  2. 90% of employees say they were as productive or more working remotely when compared to the office in 2021.
  3. 16% of companies around the world are fully remote according to an Owl labs study.
  4. During the Coronavirus, almost 70% of full-time workers are working from home.
  5. Remote employees save an average of 40 minutes daily from commuting.
  6. Nearly 77% of all employees who work from home said that they experienced an increase in productivity when compared to working in an office.
  7. Working from home increased 44% since 2016, even before the COVID-19 pandemic.
  8. In 2021, working from home accounts for over 60% of the economy of the United States.
  9. In 2020, 50% of remote workers said they would not return to a job that did not offer a choice of working from home.
  10. Approximately 80% of all workers said they would reject a job offer that does not allow work from home and flexible hours.
  11. Employees said they were willing to make some sacrifices for the ability to work remotely, such as taking on a greater workload, giving up company benefits, or taking a pay cut.
  12. 80% of remote workers said they were happy with their job compared to only 55% of those in an office. traditional office setting.
  13. The main downsides to working at home were loneliness (19%) and the inability to “turn off” after work hours (22%).
  1. 4.7 million people work remotely at least half the time in the USA.
  2. 90% of employees say they were as productive or more working remotely when compared to the office in 2021.
  3. 16% of companies around the world are fully remote according to an Owl labs study.
  4. During the Coronavirus, almost 70% of full-time workers are working from home.
  5. Remote employees save an average of 40 minutes daily from commuting.
  6. Nearly 77% of all employees who work from home said that they experienced an increase in productivity when compared to working in an office.
  7. Working from home increased 44% since 2016, even before the COVID-19 pandemic.
  8. In 2021, working from home accounts for over 60% of the economy of the United States.
  9. In 2020, 50% of remote workers said they would not return to a job that did not offer a choice of working from home.
  10. Approximately 80% of all workers said they would reject a job offer that does not allow work from home and flexible hours.
  11. Employees said they were willing to make some sacrifices for the ability to work remotely, such as taking on a greater workload, giving up company benefits, or taking a pay cut.
  12. 80% of remote workers said they were happy with their job compared to only 55% of those in an office. traditional office setting.
  13. The main downsides to working at home were loneliness (19%) and the inability to “turn off” after work hours (22%).
  1. 4.7 million people work remotely at least half the time in the USA.
  2. 90% of employees say they were as productive or more working remotely when compared to the office in 2021.
  3. 16% of companies around the world are fully remote according to an Owl labs study.
  4. During the Coronavirus, almost 70% of full-time workers are working from home.
  5. Remote employees save an average of 40 minutes daily from commuting.
  6. Nearly 77% of all employees who work from home said that they experienced an increase in productivity when compared to working in an office.
  7. Working from home increased 44% since 2016, even before the COVID-19 pandemic.
  8. In 2021, working from home accounts for over 60% of the economy of the United States.
  9. In 2020, 50% of remote workers said they would not return to a job that did not offer a choice of working from home.
  10. Approximately 80% of all workers said they would reject a job offer that does not allow work from home and flexible hours.
  11. Employees said they were willing to make some sacrifices for the ability to work remotely, such as taking on a greater workload, giving up company benefits, or taking a pay cut.
  12. 80% of remote workers said they were happy with their job compared to only 55% of those in an office. traditional office setting.
  13. The main downsides to working at home were loneliness (19%) and the inability to “turn off” after work hours (22%).
  1. 4.7 million people work remotely at least half the time in the USA.
  2. 90% of employees say they were as productive or more working remotely when compared to the office in 2021.
  3. 16% of companies around the world are fully remote according to an Owl labs study.
  4. During the Coronavirus, almost 70% of full-time workers are working from home.
  5. Remote employees save an average of 40 minutes daily from commuting.
  6. Nearly 77% of all employees who work from home said that they experienced an increase in productivity when compared to working in an office.
  7. Working from home increased 44% since 2016, even before the COVID-19 pandemic.
  8. In 2021, working from home accounts for over 60% of the economy of the United States.
  9. In 2020, 50% of remote workers said they would not return to a job that did not offer a choice of working from home.
  10. Approximately 80% of all workers said they would reject a job offer that does not allow work from home and flexible hours.
  11. Employees said they were willing to make some sacrifices for the ability to work remotely, such as taking on a greater workload, giving up company benefits, or taking a pay cut.
  12. 80% of remote workers said they were happy with their job compared to only 55% of those in an office. traditional office setting.
  13. The main downsides to working at home were loneliness (19%) and the inability to “turn off” after work hours (22%).
  1. 4.7 million people work remotely at least half the time in the USA.
  2. 90% of employees say they were as productive or more working remotely when compared to the office in 2021.
  3. 16% of companies around the world are fully remote according to an Owl labs study.
  4. During the Coronavirus, almost 70% of full-time workers are working from home.
  5. Remote employees save an average of 40 minutes daily from commuting.
  6. Nearly 77% of all employees who work from home said that they experienced an increase in productivity when compared to working in an office.
  7. Working from home increased 44% since 2016, even before the COVID-19 pandemic.
  8. In 2021, working from home accounts for over 60% of the economy of the United States.
  9. In 2020, 50% of remote workers said they would not return to a job that did not offer a choice of working from home.
  10. Approximately 80% of all workers said they would reject a job offer that does not allow work from home and flexible hours.
  11. Employees said they were willing to make some sacrifices for the ability to work remotely, such as taking on a greater workload, giving up company benefits, or taking a pay cut.
  12. 80% of remote workers said they were happy with their job compared to only 55% of those in an office. traditional office setting.
  13. The main downsides to working at home were loneliness (19%) and the inability to “turn off” after work hours (22%).
  1. 4.7 million people work remotely at least half the time in the USA.
  2. 90% of employees say they were as productive or more working remotely when compared to the office in 2021.
  3. 16% of companies around the world are fully remote according to an Owl labs study.
  4. During the Coronavirus, almost 70% of full-time workers are working from home.
  5. Remote employees save an average of 40 minutes daily from commuting.
  6. Nearly 77% of all employees who work from home said that they experienced an increase in productivity when compared to working in an office.
  7. Working from home increased 44% since 2016, even before the COVID-19 pandemic.
  8. In 2021, working from home accounts for over 60% of the economy of the United States.
  9. In 2020, 50% of remote workers said they would not return to a job that did not offer a choice of working from home.
  10. Approximately 80% of all workers said they would reject a job offer that does not allow work from home and flexible hours.
  11. Employees said they were willing to make some sacrifices for the ability to work remotely, such as taking on a greater workload, giving up company benefits, or taking a pay cut.
  12. 80% of remote workers said they were happy with their job compared to only 55% of those in an office. traditional office setting.
  13. The main downsides to working at home were loneliness (19%) and the inability to “turn off” after work hours (22%).
  1. 4.7 million people work remotely at least half the time in the USA.
  2. 90% of employees say they were as productive or more working remotely when compared to the office in 2021.
  3. 16% of companies around the world are fully remote according to an Owl labs study.
  4. During the Coronavirus, almost 70% of full-time workers are working from home.
  5. Remote employees save an average of 40 minutes daily from commuting.
  6. Nearly 77% of all employees who work from home said that they experienced an increase in productivity when compared to working in an office.
  7. Working from home increased 44% since 2016, even before the COVID-19 pandemic.
  8. In 2021, working from home accounts for over 60% of the economy of the United States.
  9. In 2020, 50% of remote workers said they would not return to a job that did not offer a choice of working from home.
  10. Approximately 80% of all workers said they would reject a job offer that does not allow work from home and flexible hours.
  11. Employees said they were willing to make some sacrifices for the ability to work remotely, such as taking on a greater workload, giving up company benefits, or taking a pay cut.
  12. 80% of remote workers said they were happy with their job compared to only 55% of those in an office. traditional office setting.
  13. The main downsides to working at home were loneliness (19%) and the inability to “turn off” after work hours (22%).
  1. 4.7 million people work remotely at least half the time in the USA.
  2. 90% of employees say they were as productive or more working remotely when compared to the office in 2021.
  3. 16% of companies around the world are fully remote according to an Owl labs study.
  4. During the Coronavirus, almost 70% of full-time workers are working from home.
  5. Remote employees save an average of 40 minutes daily from commuting.
  6. Nearly 77% of all employees who work from home said that they experienced an increase in productivity when compared to working in an office.
  7. Working from home increased 44% since 2016, even before the COVID-19 pandemic.
  8. In 2021, working from home accounts for over 60% of the economy of the United States.
  9. In 2020, 50% of remote workers said they would not return to a job that did not offer a choice of working from home.
  10. Approximately 80% of all workers said they would reject a job offer that does not allow work from home and flexible hours.
  11. Employees said they were willing to make some sacrifices for the ability to work remotely, such as taking on a greater workload, giving up company benefits, or taking a pay cut.
  12. 80% of remote workers said they were happy with their job compared to only 55% of those in an office. traditional office setting.
  13. The main downsides to working at home were loneliness (19%) and the inability to “turn off” after work hours (22%).
  1. 4.7 million people work remotely at least half the time in the USA.
  2. 90% of employees say they were as productive or more working remotely when compared to the office in 2021.
  3. 16% of companies around the world are fully remote according to an Owl labs study.
  4. During the Coronavirus, almost 70% of full-time workers are working from home.
  5. Remote employees save an average of 40 minutes daily from commuting.
  6. Nearly 77% of all employees who work from home said that they experienced an increase in productivity when compared to working in an office.
  7. Working from home increased 44% since 2016, even before the COVID-19 pandemic.
  8. In 2021, working from home accounts for over 60% of the economy of the United States.
  9. In 2020, 50% of remote workers said they would not return to a job that did not offer a choice of working from home.
  10. Approximately 80% of all workers said they would reject a job offer that does not allow work from home and flexible hours.
  11. Employees said they were willing to make some sacrifices for the ability to work remotely, such as taking on a greater workload, giving up company benefits, or taking a pay cut.
  12. 80% of remote workers said they were happy with their job compared to only 55% of those in an office. traditional office setting.
  13. The main downsides to working at home were loneliness (19%) and the inability to “turn off” after work hours (22%).
  1. 4.7 million people work remotely at least half the time in the USA.
  2. 90% of employees say they were as productive or more working remotely when compared to the office in 2021.
  3. 16% of companies around the world are fully remote according to an Owl labs study.
  4. During the Coronavirus, almost 70% of full-time workers are working from home.
  5. Remote employees save an average of 40 minutes daily from commuting.
  6. Nearly 77% of all employees who work from home said that they experienced an increase in productivity when compared to working in an office.
  7. Working from home increased 44% since 2016, even before the COVID-19 pandemic.
  8. In 2021, working from home accounts for over 60% of the economy of the United States.
  9. In 2020, 50% of remote workers said they would not return to a job that did not offer a choice of working from home.
  10. Approximately 80% of all workers said they would reject a job offer that does not allow work from home and flexible hours.
  11. Employees said they were willing to make some sacrifices for the ability to work remotely, such as taking on a greater workload, giving up company benefits, or taking a pay cut.
  12. 80% of remote workers said they were happy with their job compared to only 55% of those in an office. traditional office setting.
  13. The main downsides to working at home were loneliness (19%) and the inability to “turn off” after work hours (22%).
  1. 4.7 million people work remotely at least half the time in the USA.
  2. 90% of employees say they were as productive or more working remotely when compared to the office in 2021.
  3. 16% of companies around the world are fully remote according to an Owl labs study.
  4. During the Coronavirus, almost 70% of full-time workers are working from home.
  5. Remote employees save an average of 40 minutes daily from commuting.
  6. Nearly 77% of all employees who work from home said that they experienced an increase in productivity when compared to working in an office.
  7. Working from home increased 44% since 2016, even before the COVID-19 pandemic.
  8. In 2021, working from home accounts for over 60% of the economy of the United States.
  9. In 2020, 50% of remote workers said they would not return to a job that did not offer a choice of working from home.
  10. Approximately 80% of all workers said they would reject a job offer that does not allow work from home and flexible hours.
  11. Employees said they were willing to make some sacrifices for the ability to work remotely, such as taking on a greater workload, giving up company benefits, or taking a pay cut.
  12. 80% of remote workers said they were happy with their job compared to only 55% of those in an office. traditional office setting.
  13. The main downsides to working at home were loneliness (19%) and the inability to “turn off” after work hours (22%).
  1. 4.7 million people work remotely at least half the time in the USA.
  2. 90% of employees say they were as productive or more working remotely when compared to the office in 2021.
  3. 16% of companies around the world are fully remote according to an Owl labs study.
  4. During the Coronavirus, almost 70% of full-time workers are working from home.
  5. Remote employees save an average of 40 minutes daily from commuting.
  6. Nearly 77% of all employees who work from home said that they experienced an increase in productivity when compared to working in an office.
  7. Working from home increased 44% since 2016, even before the COVID-19 pandemic.
  8. In 2021, working from home accounts for over 60% of the economy of the United States.
  9. In 2020, 50% of remote workers said they would not return to a job that did not offer a choice of working from home.
  10. Approximately 80% of all workers said they would reject a job offer that does not allow work from home and flexible hours.
  11. Employees said they were willing to make some sacrifices for the ability to work remotely, such as taking on a greater workload, giving up company benefits, or taking a pay cut.
  12. 80% of remote workers said they were happy with their job compared to only 55% of those in an office. traditional office setting.
  13. The main downsides to working at home were loneliness (19%) and the inability to “turn off” after work hours (22%).
  1. 4.7 million people work remotely at least half the time in the USA.
  2. 90% of employees say they were as productive or more working remotely when compared to the office in 2021.
  3. 16% of companies around the world are fully remote according to an Owl labs study.
  4. During the Coronavirus, almost 70% of full-time workers are working from home.
  5. Remote employees save an average of 40 minutes daily from commuting.
  6. Nearly 77% of all employees who work from home said that they experienced an increase in productivity when compared to working in an office.
  7. Working from home increased 44% since 2016, even before the COVID-19 pandemic.
  8. In 2021, working from home accounts for over 60% of the economy of the United States.
  9. In 2020, 50% of remote workers said they would not return to a job that did not offer a choice of working from home.
  10. Approximately 80% of all workers said they would reject a job offer that does not allow work from home and flexible hours.
  11. Employees said they were willing to make some sacrifices for the ability to work remotely, such as taking on a greater workload, giving up company benefits, or taking a pay cut.
  12. 80% of remote workers said they were happy with their job compared to only 55% of those in an office. traditional office setting.
  13. The main downsides to working at home were loneliness (19%) and the inability to “turn off” after work hours (22%).
  1. 4.7 million people work remotely at least half the time in the USA.
  2. 90% of employees say they were as productive or more working remotely when compared to the office in 2021.
  3. 16% of companies around the world are fully remote according to an Owl labs study.
  4. During the Coronavirus, almost 70% of full-time workers are working from home.
  5. Remote employees save an average of 40 minutes daily from commuting.
  6. Nearly 77% of all employees who work from home said that they experienced an increase in productivity when compared to working in an office.
  7. Working from home increased 44% since 2016, even before the COVID-19 pandemic.
  8. In 2021, working from home accounts for over 60% of the economy of the United States.
  9. In 2020, 50% of remote workers said they would not return to a job that did not offer a choice of working from home.
  10. Approximately 80% of all workers said they would reject a job offer that does not allow work from home and flexible hours.
  11. Employees said they were willing to make some sacrifices for the ability to work remotely, such as taking on a greater workload, giving up company benefits, or taking a pay cut.
  12. 80% of remote workers said they were happy with their job compared to only 55% of those in an office. traditional office setting.
  13. The main downsides to working at home were loneliness (19%) and the inability to “turn off” after work hours (22%).
  1. 4.7 million people work remotely at least half the time in the USA.
  2. 90% of employees say they were as productive or more working remotely when compared to the office in 2021.
  3. 16% of companies around the world are fully remote according to an Owl labs study.
  4. During the Coronavirus, almost 70% of full-time workers are working from home.
  5. Remote employees save an average of 40 minutes daily from commuting.
  6. Nearly 77% of all employees who work from home said that they experienced an increase in productivity when compared to working in an office.
  7. Working from home increased 44% since 2016, even before the COVID-19 pandemic.
  8. In 2021, working from home accounts for over 60% of the economy of the United States.
  9. In 2020, 50% of remote workers said they would not return to a job that did not offer a choice of working from home.
  10. Approximately 80% of all workers said they would reject a job offer that does not allow work from home and flexible hours.
  11. Employees said they were willing to make some sacrifices for the ability to work remotely, such as taking on a greater workload, giving up company benefits, or taking a pay cut.
  12. 80% of remote workers said they were happy with their job compared to only 55% of those in an office. traditional office setting.
  13. The main downsides to working at home were loneliness (19%) and the inability to “turn off” after work hours (22%).
  1. 4.7 million people work remotely at least half the time in the USA.
  2. 90% of employees say they were as productive or more working remotely when compared to the office in 2021.
  3. 16% of companies around the world are fully remote according to an Owl labs study.
  4. During the Coronavirus, almost 70% of full-time workers are working from home.
  5. Remote employees save an average of 40 minutes daily from commuting.
  6. Nearly 77% of all employees who work from home said that they experienced an increase in productivity when compared to working in an office.
  7. Working from home increased 44% since 2016, even before the COVID-19 pandemic.
  8. In 2021, working from home accounts for over 60% of the economy of the United States.
  9. In 2020, 50% of remote workers said they would not return to a job that did not offer a choice of working from home.
  10. Approximately 80% of all workers said they would reject a job offer that does not allow work from home and flexible hours.
  11. Employees said they were willing to make some sacrifices for the ability to work remotely, such as taking on a greater workload, giving up company benefits, or taking a pay cut.
  12. 80% of remote workers said they were happy with their job compared to only 55% of those in an office. traditional office setting.
  13. The main downsides to working at home were loneliness (19%) and the inability to “turn off” after work hours (22%).
  1. 4.7 million people work remotely at least half the time in the USA.
  2. 90% of employees say they were as productive or more working remotely when compared to the office in 2021.
  3. 16% of companies around the world are fully remote according to an Owl labs study.
  4. During the Coronavirus, almost 70% of full-time workers are working from home.
  5. Remote employees save an average of 40 minutes daily from commuting.
  6. Nearly 77% of all employees who work from home said that they experienced an increase in productivity when compared to working in an office.
  7. Working from home increased 44% since 2016, even before the COVID-19 pandemic.
  8. In 2021, working from home accounts for over 60% of the economy of the United States.
  9. In 2020, 50% of remote workers said they would not return to a job that did not offer a choice of working from home.
  10. Approximately 80% of all workers said they would reject a job offer that does not allow work from home and flexible hours.
  11. Employees said they were willing to make some sacrifices for the ability to work remotely, such as taking on a greater workload, giving up company benefits, or taking a pay cut.
  12. 80% of remote workers said they were happy with their job compared to only 55% of those in an office. traditional office setting.
  13. The main downsides to working at home were loneliness (19%) and the inability to “turn off” after work hours (22%).
  1. 4.7 million people work remotely at least half the time in the USA.
  2. 90% of employees say they were as productive or more working remotely when compared to the office in 2021.
  3. 16% of companies around the world are fully remote according to an Owl labs study.
  4. During the Coronavirus, almost 70% of full-time workers are working from home.
  5. Remote employees save an average of 40 minutes daily from commuting.
  6. Nearly 77% of all employees who work from home said that they experienced an increase in productivity when compared to working in an office.
  7. Working from home increased 44% since 2016, even before the COVID-19 pandemic.
  8. In 2021, working from home accounts for over 60% of the economy of the United States.
  9. In 2020, 50% of remote workers said they would not return to a job that did not offer a choice of working from home.
  10. Approximately 80% of all workers said they would reject a job offer that does not allow work from home and flexible hours.
  11. Employees said they were willing to make some sacrifices for the ability to work remotely, such as taking on a greater workload, giving up company benefits, or taking a pay cut.
  12. 80% of remote workers said they were happy with their job compared to only 55% of those in an office. traditional office setting.
  13. The main downsides to working at home were loneliness (19%) and the inability to “turn off” after work hours (22%).
  1. 4.7 million people work remotely at least half the time in the USA.
  2. 90% of employees say they were as productive or more working remotely when compared to the office in 2021.
  3. 16% of companies around the world are fully remote according to an Owl labs study.
  4. During the Coronavirus, almost 70% of full-time workers are working from home.
  5. Remote employees save an average of 40 minutes daily from commuting.
  6. Nearly 77% of all employees who work from home said that they experienced an increase in productivity when compared to working in an office.
  7. Working from home increased 44% since 2016, even before the COVID-19 pandemic.
  8. In 2021, working from home accounts for over 60% of the economy of the United States.
  9. In 2020, 50% of remote workers said they would not return to a job that did not offer a choice of working from home.
  10. Approximately 80% of all workers said they would reject a job offer that does not allow work from home and flexible hours.
  11. Employees said they were willing to make some sacrifices for the ability to work remotely, such as taking on a greater workload, giving up company benefits, or taking a pay cut.
  12. 80% of remote workers said they were happy with their job compared to only 55% of those in an office. traditional office setting.
  13. The main downsides to working at home were loneliness (19%) and the inability to “turn off” after work hours (22%).
Chapter 1

Global Work From Home Statistics

More people are working from than ever before. We'll answer several important questions in this chapter, including if working from home increases productivity. We'll also cover the most important and up-to-date global work from home statistics.

Overview Of Remote Work Statistics

Industry Remote Workers
Percent Of Full-Time Workers Working Remotely 70%
Percent Of Companies Fully Remote 16%
Percent Of Remote Workers Who Are Happy 80%

4.7 million people work remotely at least half the time in the USA.

The idea of working from home has been around for several decades.

Although this possibility was available, only a few industries took advantage of it in the beginning.

But in 2020, the Coronavirus pandemic came along and changed the way people work and the way people think about work.

90% of employees say they were as productive or more working remotely when compared to the office in 2021.

16% of companies around the world are fully remote according to an Owl labs study.

During the Coronavirus, almost 70% of full-time workers are working from home.

Remote employees save an average of 40 minutes daily from commuting.

Let’s explore a few of the findings and trends that this past year has taught us about work.

Does working from home increase productivity?

Many companies had fears that workers would become lazy and unproductive if they were allowed to work from home. This mindset came from the traditional workplace where the office was for work, and home was for relaxing.

They feared that workers would not be able to get into a work mindset at home and that their company would suffer for it. There was a sense that workers needed to be monitored and controlled to get work done.

Studies on productivity among workers found that in most cases, these fears were unfounded. A Stanford study of 16,000 workers found that working from home increased their productivity by 13%. The study involved call center workers.

Workers attributed the increase in productivity to the ability to take more calls per hour due to a quieter work environment. They also took fewer breaks and needed fewer sick days.

Another study reflected similar trends and found that at least 77% who work from home said that they experienced at least some increase in productivity when compared to doing the same work at the office. In the same study, at least 30% said they could get more done in less time.

working from home increases productivity

What percentage of jobs are work from home?

It shouldn't be surprising that only certain jobs can be done from home. Many types of call center jobs and office work can be done more easily from home.

In a study by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, it was found that 37% of workers in financial operations, management, and business were more likely to do some of all of their work from home.

Those in professional occupations were 33% more likely to work from home. These were the occupations with the highest number of workers doing at least some of their work from home.

Do companies save money with remote employees?

Companies that allow all their employees to work from home full-time enjoy several business savings and benefits that can increase their competitive advantage.

These include savings on rent and utilities, cleaning services, and property taxes. Companies also enjoy higher employee retention and increased productivity.

There are some downsides to this style of work. One of them is data security because employees often use their own systems, and there is no way to monitor security procedures.

If a data breach occurs, it could end up costing the company hundreds of thousands of dollars. Also, a data breach would cause the company to lose customer trust.

Monitoring computer systems at an employee’s home is more challenging than taking care of a company system in a centralized location.  

Companies can experience other potential savings, too. A recent study found that 34% of all employees said they would be willing to take up to a 5% pay cut if they would be allowed to work from home.

Another way that companies leveraged these savings in salaries was to offer the ability to work from home instead of a salary raise.

These are only a few ways companies can lower their expenses by allowing workers to work from home. The situation is different for every business, and it is important to weigh the savings against the risks.

10 Important Global Work from Home Statistics

  1. The U.S. Census Bureau found a divide among those who were able to work from home in terms of education, income, and health status.
  2. Of those with incomes of $200,00 or more, 73.1% switched to working from home during the pandemic compared to only 32.1% of those who made between $50,000 and $75,000.
  3. Higher incomes were found among those with higher income, and the U.S. Census Bureau found that those with a bachelor’s degree or higher were three times more likely to work from home during the pandemic than those with a high school diploma or GED.
  4. When asked to rank their health status, those who reported poor health status were less likely to work from home as opposed to those who reported excellent health status.
  5. As of 2019, nearly 68% of the global workforce reported working from home at least once a month.
  6. Even before the COVID-19 pandemic, working from home increased by 44% since 2016.
  7. In companies that allowed remote working, 55% were founders and C-level executives, and 48% were at the VP level.
  8. A Fundera study found that among remote workers below the executive level, 16% were managers, 14% were office and administrative support, and 13% were from the sales and business development departments.
  9. A pre-COVID-19 study by Owl Labs found that 18% of the workers were from the IT department, 9% were from finance, 14% were in customer service, and 11% were administrative and support staff.
  10. As of 2021, working from home accounts for over 60% of the U.S. economy.

remote working in usa economy


Key Takeaway: These statistics show a trend that should not be surprising considering the effects of the pandemic.

The idea of working from home was already on the rise before the pandemic hit. It is not surprising that there are many differences in the types of jobs that can be done at home and the industries that have the most remote workers.

Overall, these statistics show favorable results in productivity for those who can work from home.

working from home is more popular every year

Companies that allow working from home and flexible work schedules have an advantage in cost savings and an advantage when it comes to attracting and retaining the best employees.

Overview Of Remote Work Statistics

Industry Remote Workers
Percent Of Full-Time Workers Working Remotely 70%
Percent Of Companies Fully Remote 16%
Percent Of Remote Workers Who Are Happy 80%

4.7 million people work remotely at least half the time in the USA.

The idea of working from home has been around for several decades.

Although this possibility was available, only a few industries took advantage of it in the beginning.

But in 2020, the Coronavirus pandemic came along and changed the way people work and the way people think about work.

90% of employees say they were as productive or more working remotely when compared to the office in 2021.

16% of companies around the world are fully remote according to an Owl labs study.

During the Coronavirus, almost 70% of full-time workers are working from home.

Remote employees save an average of 40 minutes daily from commuting.

Let’s explore a few of the findings and trends that this past year has taught us about work.

Does working from home increase productivity?

Many companies had fears that workers would become lazy and unproductive if they were allowed to work from home. This mindset came from the traditional workplace where the office was for work, and home was for relaxing.

They feared that workers would not be able to get into a work mindset at home and that their company would suffer for it. There was a sense that workers needed to be monitored and controlled to get work done.

Studies on productivity among workers found that in most cases, these fears were unfounded. A Stanford study of 16,000 workers found that working from home increased their productivity by 13%. The study involved call center workers.

Workers attributed the increase in productivity to the ability to take more calls per hour due to a quieter work environment. They also took fewer breaks and needed fewer sick days.

Another study reflected similar trends and found that at least 77% who work from home said that they experienced at least some increase in productivity when compared to doing the same work at the office. In the same study, at least 30% said they could get more done in less time.

working from home increases productivity

What percentage of jobs are work from home?

It shouldn't be surprising that only certain jobs can be done from home. Many types of call center jobs and office work can be done more easily from home.

In a study by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, it was found that 37% of workers in financial operations, management, and business were more likely to do some of all of their work from home.

Those in professional occupations were 33% more likely to work from home. These were the occupations with the highest number of workers doing at least some of their work from home.

Do companies save money with remote employees?

Companies that allow all their employees to work from home full-time enjoy several business savings and benefits that can increase their competitive advantage.

These include savings on rent and utilities, cleaning services, and property taxes. Companies also enjoy higher employee retention and increased productivity.

There are some downsides to this style of work. One of them is data security because employees often use their own systems, and there is no way to monitor security procedures.

If a data breach occurs, it could end up costing the company hundreds of thousands of dollars. Also, a data breach would cause the company to lose customer trust.

Monitoring computer systems at an employee’s home is more challenging than taking care of a company system in a centralized location.  

Companies can experience other potential savings, too. A recent study found that 34% of all employees said they would be willing to take up to a 5% pay cut if they would be allowed to work from home.

Another way that companies leveraged these savings in salaries was to offer the ability to work from home instead of a salary raise.

These are only a few ways companies can lower their expenses by allowing workers to work from home. The situation is different for every business, and it is important to weigh the savings against the risks.

10 Important Global Work from Home Statistics

  1. The U.S. Census Bureau found a divide among those who were able to work from home in terms of education, income, and health status.
  2. Of those with incomes of $200,00 or more, 73.1% switched to working from home during the pandemic compared to only 32.1% of those who made between $50,000 and $75,000.
  3. Higher incomes were found among those with higher income, and the U.S. Census Bureau found that those with a bachelor’s degree or higher were three times more likely to work from home during the pandemic than those with a high school diploma or GED.
  4. When asked to rank their health status, those who reported poor health status were less likely to work from home as opposed to those who reported excellent health status.
  5. As of 2019, nearly 68% of the global workforce reported working from home at least once a month.
  6. Even before the COVID-19 pandemic, working from home increased by 44% since 2016.
  7. In companies that allowed remote working, 55% were founders and C-level executives, and 48% were at the VP level.
  8. A Fundera study found that among remote workers below the executive level, 16% were managers, 14% were office and administrative support, and 13% were from the sales and business development departments.
  9. A pre-COVID-19 study by Owl Labs found that 18% of the workers were from the IT department, 9% were from finance, 14% were in customer service, and 11% were administrative and support staff.
  10. As of 2021, working from home accounts for over 60% of the U.S. economy.

remote working in usa economy


Key Takeaway: These statistics show a trend that should not be surprising considering the effects of the pandemic.

The idea of working from home was already on the rise before the pandemic hit. It is not surprising that there are many differences in the types of jobs that can be done at home and the industries that have the most remote workers.

Overall, these statistics show favorable results in productivity for those who can work from home.

working from home is more popular every year

Companies that allow working from home and flexible work schedules have an advantage in cost savings and an advantage when it comes to attracting and retaining the best employees.

Overview Of Remote Work Statistics

Industry Remote Workers
Percent Of Full-Time Workers Working Remotely 70%
Percent Of Companies Fully Remote 16%
Percent Of Remote Workers Who Are Happy 80%

4.7 million people work remotely at least half the time in the USA.

The idea of working from home has been around for several decades.

Although this possibility was available, only a few industries took advantage of it in the beginning.

But in 2020, the Coronavirus pandemic came along and changed the way people work and the way people think about work.

90% of employees say they were as productive or more working remotely when compared to the office in 2021.

16% of companies around the world are fully remote according to an Owl labs study.

During the Coronavirus, almost 70% of full-time workers are working from home.

Remote employees save an average of 40 minutes daily from commuting.

Let’s explore a few of the findings and trends that this past year has taught us about work.

Does working from home increase productivity?

Many companies had fears that workers would become lazy and unproductive if they were allowed to work from home. This mindset came from the traditional workplace where the office was for work, and home was for relaxing.

They feared that workers would not be able to get into a work mindset at home and that their company would suffer for it. There was a sense that workers needed to be monitored and controlled to get work done.

Studies on productivity among workers found that in most cases, these fears were unfounded. A Stanford study of 16,000 workers found that working from home increased their productivity by 13%. The study involved call center workers.

Workers attributed the increase in productivity to the ability to take more calls per hour due to a quieter work environment. They also took fewer breaks and needed fewer sick days.

Another study reflected similar trends and found that at least 77% who work from home said that they experienced at least some increase in productivity when compared to doing the same work at the office. In the same study, at least 30% said they could get more done in less time.

working from home increases productivity

What percentage of jobs are work from home?

It shouldn't be surprising that only certain jobs can be done from home. Many types of call center jobs and office work can be done more easily from home.

In a study by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, it was found that 37% of workers in financial operations, management, and business were more likely to do some of all of their work from home.

Those in professional occupations were 33% more likely to work from home. These were the occupations with the highest number of workers doing at least some of their work from home.

Do companies save money with remote employees?

Companies that allow all their employees to work from home full-time enjoy several business savings and benefits that can increase their competitive advantage.

These include savings on rent and utilities, cleaning services, and property taxes. Companies also enjoy higher employee retention and increased productivity.

There are some downsides to this style of work. One of them is data security because employees often use their own systems, and there is no way to monitor security procedures.

If a data breach occurs, it could end up costing the company hundreds of thousands of dollars. Also, a data breach would cause the company to lose customer trust.

Monitoring computer systems at an employee’s home is more challenging than taking care of a company system in a centralized location.  

Companies can experience other potential savings, too. A recent study found that 34% of all employees said they would be willing to take up to a 5% pay cut if they would be allowed to work from home.

Another way that companies leveraged these savings in salaries was to offer the ability to work from home instead of a salary raise.

These are only a few ways companies can lower their expenses by allowing workers to work from home. The situation is different for every business, and it is important to weigh the savings against the risks.

10 Important Global Work from Home Statistics

  1. The U.S. Census Bureau found a divide among those who were able to work from home in terms of education, income, and health status.
  2. Of those with incomes of $200,00 or more, 73.1% switched to working from home during the pandemic compared to only 32.1% of those who made between $50,000 and $75,000.
  3. Higher incomes were found among those with higher income, and the U.S. Census Bureau found that those with a bachelor’s degree or higher were three times more likely to work from home during the pandemic than those with a high school diploma or GED.
  4. When asked to rank their health status, those who reported poor health status were less likely to work from home as opposed to those who reported excellent health status.
  5. As of 2019, nearly 68% of the global workforce reported working from home at least once a month.
  6. Even before the COVID-19 pandemic, working from home increased by 44% since 2016.
  7. In companies that allowed remote working, 55% were founders and C-level executives, and 48% were at the VP level.
  8. A Fundera study found that among remote workers below the executive level, 16% were managers, 14% were office and administrative support, and 13% were from the sales and business development departments.
  9. A pre-COVID-19 study by Owl Labs found that 18% of the workers were from the IT department, 9% were from finance, 14% were in customer service, and 11% were administrative and support staff.
  10. As of 2021, working from home accounts for over 60% of the U.S. economy.

remote working in usa economy


Key Takeaway: These statistics show a trend that should not be surprising considering the effects of the pandemic.

The idea of working from home was already on the rise before the pandemic hit. It is not surprising that there are many differences in the types of jobs that can be done at home and the industries that have the most remote workers.

Overall, these statistics show favorable results in productivity for those who can work from home.

working from home is more popular every year

Companies that allow working from home and flexible work schedules have an advantage in cost savings and an advantage when it comes to attracting and retaining the best employees.

Overview Of Remote Work Statistics

Industry Remote Workers
Percent Of Full-Time Workers Working Remotely 70%
Percent Of Companies Fully Remote 16%
Percent Of Remote Workers Who Are Happy 80%

4.7 million people work remotely at least half the time in the USA.

The idea of working from home has been around for several decades.

Although this possibility was available, only a few industries took advantage of it in the beginning.

But in 2020, the Coronavirus pandemic came along and changed the way people work and the way people think about work.

90% of employees say they were as productive or more working remotely when compared to the office in 2021.

16% of companies around the world are fully remote according to an Owl labs study.

During the Coronavirus, almost 70% of full-time workers are working from home.

Remote employees save an average of 40 minutes daily from commuting.

Let’s explore a few of the findings and trends that this past year has taught us about work.

Does working from home increase productivity?

Many companies had fears that workers would become lazy and unproductive if they were allowed to work from home. This mindset came from the traditional workplace where the office was for work, and home was for relaxing.

They feared that workers would not be able to get into a work mindset at home and that their company would suffer for it. There was a sense that workers needed to be monitored and controlled to get work done.

Studies on productivity among workers found that in most cases, these fears were unfounded. A Stanford study of 16,000 workers found that working from home increased their productivity by 13%. The study involved call center workers.

Workers attributed the increase in productivity to the ability to take more calls per hour due to a quieter work environment. They also took fewer breaks and needed fewer sick days.

Another study reflected similar trends and found that at least 77% who work from home said that they experienced at least some increase in productivity when compared to doing the same work at the office. In the same study, at least 30% said they could get more done in less time.

working from home increases productivity

What percentage of jobs are work from home?

It shouldn't be surprising that only certain jobs can be done from home. Many types of call center jobs and office work can be done more easily from home.

In a study by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, it was found that 37% of workers in financial operations, management, and business were more likely to do some of all of their work from home.

Those in professional occupations were 33% more likely to work from home. These were the occupations with the highest number of workers doing at least some of their work from home.

Do companies save money with remote employees?

Companies that allow all their employees to work from home full-time enjoy several business savings and benefits that can increase their competitive advantage.

These include savings on rent and utilities, cleaning services, and property taxes. Companies also enjoy higher employee retention and increased productivity.

There are some downsides to this style of work. One of them is data security because employees often use their own systems, and there is no way to monitor security procedures.

If a data breach occurs, it could end up costing the company hundreds of thousands of dollars. Also, a data breach would cause the company to lose customer trust.

Monitoring computer systems at an employee’s home is more challenging than taking care of a company system in a centralized location.  

Companies can experience other potential savings, too. A recent study found that 34% of all employees said they would be willing to take up to a 5% pay cut if they would be allowed to work from home.

Another way that companies leveraged these savings in salaries was to offer the ability to work from home instead of a salary raise.

These are only a few ways companies can lower their expenses by allowing workers to work from home. The situation is different for every business, and it is important to weigh the savings against the risks.

10 Important Global Work from Home Statistics

  1. The U.S. Census Bureau found a divide among those who were able to work from home in terms of education, income, and health status.
  2. Of those with incomes of $200,00 or more, 73.1% switched to working from home during the pandemic compared to only 32.1% of those who made between $50,000 and $75,000.
  3. Higher incomes were found among those with higher income, and the U.S. Census Bureau found that those with a bachelor’s degree or higher were three times more likely to work from home during the pandemic than those with a high school diploma or GED.
  4. When asked to rank their health status, those who reported poor health status were less likely to work from home as opposed to those who reported excellent health status.
  5. As of 2019, nearly 68% of the global workforce reported working from home at least once a month.
  6. Even before the COVID-19 pandemic, working from home increased by 44% since 2016.
  7. In companies that allowed remote working, 55% were founders and C-level executives, and 48% were at the VP level.
  8. A Fundera study found that among remote workers below the executive level, 16% were managers, 14% were office and administrative support, and 13% were from the sales and business development departments.
  9. A pre-COVID-19 study by Owl Labs found that 18% of the workers were from the IT department, 9% were from finance, 14% were in customer service, and 11% were administrative and support staff.
  10. As of 2021, working from home accounts for over 60% of the U.S. economy.

remote working in usa economy


Key Takeaway: These statistics show a trend that should not be surprising considering the effects of the pandemic.

The idea of working from home was already on the rise before the pandemic hit. It is not surprising that there are many differences in the types of jobs that can be done at home and the industries that have the most remote workers.

Overall, these statistics show favorable results in productivity for those who can work from home.

working from home is more popular every year

Companies that allow working from home and flexible work schedules have an advantage in cost savings and an advantage when it comes to attracting and retaining the best employees.

Overview Of Remote Work Statistics

Industry Remote Workers
Percent Of Full-Time Workers Working Remotely 70%
Percent Of Companies Fully Remote 16%
Percent Of Remote Workers Who Are Happy 80%

4.7 million people work remotely at least half the time in the USA.

The idea of working from home has been around for several decades.

Although this possibility was available, only a few industries took advantage of it in the beginning.

But in 2020, the Coronavirus pandemic came along and changed the way people work and the way people think about work.

90% of employees say they were as productive or more working remotely when compared to the office in 2021.

16% of companies around the world are fully remote according to an Owl labs study.

During the Coronavirus, almost 70% of full-time workers are working from home.

Remote employees save an average of 40 minutes daily from commuting.

Let’s explore a few of the findings and trends that this past year has taught us about work.

Does working from home increase productivity?

Many companies had fears that workers would become lazy and unproductive if they were allowed to work from home. This mindset came from the traditional workplace where the office was for work, and home was for relaxing.

They feared that workers would not be able to get into a work mindset at home and that their company would suffer for it. There was a sense that workers needed to be monitored and controlled to get work done.

Studies on productivity among workers found that in most cases, these fears were unfounded. A Stanford study of 16,000 workers found that working from home increased their productivity by 13%. The study involved call center workers.

Workers attributed the increase in productivity to the ability to take more calls per hour due to a quieter work environment. They also took fewer breaks and needed fewer sick days.

Another study reflected similar trends and found that at least 77% who work from home said that they experienced at least some increase in productivity when compared to doing the same work at the office. In the same study, at least 30% said they could get more done in less time.

working from home increases productivity

What percentage of jobs are work from home?

It shouldn't be surprising that only certain jobs can be done from home. Many types of call center jobs and office work can be done more easily from home.

In a study by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, it was found that 37% of workers in financial operations, management, and business were more likely to do some of all of their work from home.

Those in professional occupations were 33% more likely to work from home. These were the occupations with the highest number of workers doing at least some of their work from home.

Do companies save money with remote employees?

Companies that allow all their employees to work from home full-time enjoy several business savings and benefits that can increase their competitive advantage.

These include savings on rent and utilities, cleaning services, and property taxes. Companies also enjoy higher employee retention and increased productivity.

There are some downsides to this style of work. One of them is data security because employees often use their own systems, and there is no way to monitor security procedures.

If a data breach occurs, it could end up costing the company hundreds of thousands of dollars. Also, a data breach would cause the company to lose customer trust.

Monitoring computer systems at an employee’s home is more challenging than taking care of a company system in a centralized location.  

Companies can experience other potential savings, too. A recent study found that 34% of all employees said they would be willing to take up to a 5% pay cut if they would be allowed to work from home.

Another way that companies leveraged these savings in salaries was to offer the ability to work from home instead of a salary raise.

These are only a few ways companies can lower their expenses by allowing workers to work from home. The situation is different for every business, and it is important to weigh the savings against the risks.

10 Important Global Work from Home Statistics

  1. The U.S. Census Bureau found a divide among those who were able to work from home in terms of education, income, and health status.
  2. Of those with incomes of $200,00 or more, 73.1% switched to working from home during the pandemic compared to only 32.1% of those who made between $50,000 and $75,000.
  3. Higher incomes were found among those with higher income, and the U.S. Census Bureau found that those with a bachelor’s degree or higher were three times more likely to work from home during the pandemic than those with a high school diploma or GED.
  4. When asked to rank their health status, those who reported poor health status were less likely to work from home as opposed to those who reported excellent health status.
  5. As of 2019, nearly 68% of the global workforce reported working from home at least once a month.
  6. Even before the COVID-19 pandemic, working from home increased by 44% since 2016.
  7. In companies that allowed remote working, 55% were founders and C-level executives, and 48% were at the VP level.
  8. A Fundera study found that among remote workers below the executive level, 16% were managers, 14% were office and administrative support, and 13% were from the sales and business development departments.
  9. A pre-COVID-19 study by Owl Labs found that 18% of the workers were from the IT department, 9% were from finance, 14% were in customer service, and 11% were administrative and support staff.
  10. As of 2021, working from home accounts for over 60% of the U.S. economy.

remote working in usa economy


Key Takeaway: These statistics show a trend that should not be surprising considering the effects of the pandemic.

The idea of working from home was already on the rise before the pandemic hit. It is not surprising that there are many differences in the types of jobs that can be done at home and the industries that have the most remote workers.

Overall, these statistics show favorable results in productivity for those who can work from home.

working from home is more popular every year

Companies that allow working from home and flexible work schedules have an advantage in cost savings and an advantage when it comes to attracting and retaining the best employees.

Overview Of Remote Work Statistics

Industry Remote Workers
Percent Of Full-Time Workers Working Remotely 70%
Percent Of Companies Fully Remote 16%
Percent Of Remote Workers Who Are Happy 80%

4.7 million people work remotely at least half the time in the USA.

The idea of working from home has been around for several decades.

Although this possibility was available, only a few industries took advantage of it in the beginning.

But in 2020, the Coronavirus pandemic came along and changed the way people work and the way people think about work.

90% of employees say they were as productive or more working remotely when compared to the office in 2021.

16% of companies around the world are fully remote according to an Owl labs study.

During the Coronavirus, almost 70% of full-time workers are working from home.

Remote employees save an average of 40 minutes daily from commuting.

Let’s explore a few of the findings and trends that this past year has taught us about work.

Does working from home increase productivity?

Many companies had fears that workers would become lazy and unproductive if they were allowed to work from home. This mindset came from the traditional workplace where the office was for work, and home was for relaxing.

They feared that workers would not be able to get into a work mindset at home and that their company would suffer for it. There was a sense that workers needed to be monitored and controlled to get work done.

Studies on productivity among workers found that in most cases, these fears were unfounded. A Stanford study of 16,000 workers found that working from home increased their productivity by 13%. The study involved call center workers.

Workers attributed the increase in productivity to the ability to take more calls per hour due to a quieter work environment. They also took fewer breaks and needed fewer sick days.

Another study reflected similar trends and found that at least 77% who work from home said that they experienced at least some increase in productivity when compared to doing the same work at the office. In the same study, at least 30% said they could get more done in less time.

working from home increases productivity

What percentage of jobs are work from home?

It shouldn't be surprising that only certain jobs can be done from home. Many types of call center jobs and office work can be done more easily from home.

In a study by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, it was found that 37% of workers in financial operations, management, and business were more likely to do some of all of their work from home.

Those in professional occupations were 33% more likely to work from home. These were the occupations with the highest number of workers doing at least some of their work from home.

Do companies save money with remote employees?

Companies that allow all their employees to work from home full-time enjoy several business savings and benefits that can increase their competitive advantage.

These include savings on rent and utilities, cleaning services, and property taxes. Companies also enjoy higher employee retention and increased productivity.

There are some downsides to this style of work. One of them is data security because employees often use their own systems, and there is no way to monitor security procedures.

If a data breach occurs, it could end up costing the company hundreds of thousands of dollars. Also, a data breach would cause the company to lose customer trust.

Monitoring computer systems at an employee’s home is more challenging than taking care of a company system in a centralized location.  

Companies can experience other potential savings, too. A recent study found that 34% of all employees said they would be willing to take up to a 5% pay cut if they would be allowed to work from home.

Another way that companies leveraged these savings in salaries was to offer the ability to work from home instead of a salary raise.

These are only a few ways companies can lower their expenses by allowing workers to work from home. The situation is different for every business, and it is important to weigh the savings against the risks.

10 Important Global Work from Home Statistics

  1. The U.S. Census Bureau found a divide among those who were able to work from home in terms of education, income, and health status.
  2. Of those with incomes of $200,00 or more, 73.1% switched to working from home during the pandemic compared to only 32.1% of those who made between $50,000 and $75,000.
  3. Higher incomes were found among those with higher income, and the U.S. Census Bureau found that those with a bachelor’s degree or higher were three times more likely to work from home during the pandemic than those with a high school diploma or GED.
  4. When asked to rank their health status, those who reported poor health status were less likely to work from home as opposed to those who reported excellent health status.
  5. As of 2019, nearly 68% of the global workforce reported working from home at least once a month.
  6. Even before the COVID-19 pandemic, working from home increased by 44% since 2016.
  7. In companies that allowed remote working, 55% were founders and C-level executives, and 48% were at the VP level.
  8. A Fundera study found that among remote workers below the executive level, 16% were managers, 14% were office and administrative support, and 13% were from the sales and business development departments.
  9. A pre-COVID-19 study by Owl Labs found that 18% of the workers were from the IT department, 9% were from finance, 14% were in customer service, and 11% were administrative and support staff.
  10. As of 2021, working from home accounts for over 60% of the U.S. economy.

remote working in usa economy


Key Takeaway: These statistics show a trend that should not be surprising considering the effects of the pandemic.

The idea of working from home was already on the rise before the pandemic hit. It is not surprising that there are many differences in the types of jobs that can be done at home and the industries that have the most remote workers.

Overall, these statistics show favorable results in productivity for those who can work from home.

working from home is more popular every year

Companies that allow working from home and flexible work schedules have an advantage in cost savings and an advantage when it comes to attracting and retaining the best employees.

Overview Of Remote Work Statistics

Industry Remote Workers
Percent Of Full-Time Workers Working Remotely 70%
Percent Of Companies Fully Remote 16%
Percent Of Remote Workers Who Are Happy 80%

4.7 million people work remotely at least half the time in the USA.

The idea of working from home has been around for several decades.

Although this possibility was available, only a few industries took advantage of it in the beginning.

But in 2020, the Coronavirus pandemic came along and changed the way people work and the way people think about work.

90% of employees say they were as productive or more working remotely when compared to the office in 2021.

16% of companies around the world are fully remote according to an Owl labs study.

During the Coronavirus, almost 70% of full-time workers are working from home.

Remote employees save an average of 40 minutes daily from commuting.

Let’s explore a few of the findings and trends that this past year has taught us about work.

Does working from home increase productivity?

Many companies had fears that workers would become lazy and unproductive if they were allowed to work from home. This mindset came from the traditional workplace where the office was for work, and home was for relaxing.

They feared that workers would not be able to get into a work mindset at home and that their company would suffer for it. There was a sense that workers needed to be monitored and controlled to get work done.

Studies on productivity among workers found that in most cases, these fears were unfounded. A Stanford study of 16,000 workers found that working from home increased their productivity by 13%. The study involved call center workers.

Workers attributed the increase in productivity to the ability to take more calls per hour due to a quieter work environment. They also took fewer breaks and needed fewer sick days.

Another study reflected similar trends and found that at least 77% who work from home said that they experienced at least some increase in productivity when compared to doing the same work at the office. In the same study, at least 30% said they could get more done in less time.

working from home increases productivity

What percentage of jobs are work from home?

It shouldn't be surprising that only certain jobs can be done from home. Many types of call center jobs and office work can be done more easily from home.

In a study by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, it was found that 37% of workers in financial operations, management, and business were more likely to do some of all of their work from home.

Those in professional occupations were 33% more likely to work from home. These were the occupations with the highest number of workers doing at least some of their work from home.

Do companies save money with remote employees?

Companies that allow all their employees to work from home full-time enjoy several business savings and benefits that can increase their competitive advantage.

These include savings on rent and utilities, cleaning services, and property taxes. Companies also enjoy higher employee retention and increased productivity.

There are some downsides to this style of work. One of them is data security because employees often use their own systems, and there is no way to monitor security procedures.

If a data breach occurs, it could end up costing the company hundreds of thousands of dollars. Also, a data breach would cause the company to lose customer trust.

Monitoring computer systems at an employee’s home is more challenging than taking care of a company system in a centralized location.  

Companies can experience other potential savings, too. A recent study found that 34% of all employees said they would be willing to take up to a 5% pay cut if they would be allowed to work from home.

Another way that companies leveraged these savings in salaries was to offer the ability to work from home instead of a salary raise.

These are only a few ways companies can lower their expenses by allowing workers to work from home. The situation is different for every business, and it is important to weigh the savings against the risks.

10 Important Global Work from Home Statistics

  1. The U.S. Census Bureau found a divide among those who were able to work from home in terms of education, income, and health status.
  2. Of those with incomes of $200,00 or more, 73.1% switched to working from home during the pandemic compared to only 32.1% of those who made between $50,000 and $75,000.
  3. Higher incomes were found among those with higher income, and the U.S. Census Bureau found that those with a bachelor’s degree or higher were three times more likely to work from home during the pandemic than those with a high school diploma or GED.
  4. When asked to rank their health status, those who reported poor health status were less likely to work from home as opposed to those who reported excellent health status.
  5. As of 2019, nearly 68% of the global workforce reported working from home at least once a month.
  6. Even before the COVID-19 pandemic, working from home increased by 44% since 2016.
  7. In companies that allowed remote working, 55% were founders and C-level executives, and 48% were at the VP level.
  8. A Fundera study found that among remote workers below the executive level, 16% were managers, 14% were office and administrative support, and 13% were from the sales and business development departments.
  9. A pre-COVID-19 study by Owl Labs found that 18% of the workers were from the IT department, 9% were from finance, 14% were in customer service, and 11% were administrative and support staff.
  10. As of 2021, working from home accounts for over 60% of the U.S. economy.

remote working in usa economy


Key Takeaway: These statistics show a trend that should not be surprising considering the effects of the pandemic.

The idea of working from home was already on the rise before the pandemic hit. It is not surprising that there are many differences in the types of jobs that can be done at home and the industries that have the most remote workers.

Overall, these statistics show favorable results in productivity for those who can work from home.

working from home is more popular every year

Companies that allow working from home and flexible work schedules have an advantage in cost savings and an advantage when it comes to attracting and retaining the best employees.

Overview Of Remote Work Statistics

Industry Remote Workers
Percent Of Full-Time Workers Working Remotely 70%
Percent Of Companies Fully Remote 16%
Percent Of Remote Workers Who Are Happy 80%

4.7 million people work remotely at least half the time in the USA.

The idea of working from home has been around for several decades.

Although this possibility was available, only a few industries took advantage of it in the beginning.

But in 2020, the Coronavirus pandemic came along and changed the way people work and the way people think about work.

90% of employees say they were as productive or more working remotely when compared to the office in 2021.

16% of companies around the world are fully remote according to an Owl labs study.

During the Coronavirus, almost 70% of full-time workers are working from home.

Remote employees save an average of 40 minutes daily from commuting.

Let’s explore a few of the findings and trends that this past year has taught us about work.

Does working from home increase productivity?

Many companies had fears that workers would become lazy and unproductive if they were allowed to work from home. This mindset came from the traditional workplace where the office was for work, and home was for relaxing.

They feared that workers would not be able to get into a work mindset at home and that their company would suffer for it. There was a sense that workers needed to be monitored and controlled to get work done.

Studies on productivity among workers found that in most cases, these fears were unfounded. A Stanford study of 16,000 workers found that working from home increased their productivity by 13%. The study involved call center workers.

Workers attributed the increase in productivity to the ability to take more calls per hour due to a quieter work environment. They also took fewer breaks and needed fewer sick days.

Another study reflected similar trends and found that at least 77% who work from home said that they experienced at least some increase in productivity when compared to doing the same work at the office. In the same study, at least 30% said they could get more done in less time.

working from home increases productivity

What percentage of jobs are work from home?

It shouldn't be surprising that only certain jobs can be done from home. Many types of call center jobs and office work can be done more easily from home.

In a study by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, it was found that 37% of workers in financial operations, management, and business were more likely to do some of all of their work from home.

Those in professional occupations were 33% more likely to work from home. These were the occupations with the highest number of workers doing at least some of their work from home.

Do companies save money with remote employees?

Companies that allow all their employees to work from home full-time enjoy several business savings and benefits that can increase their competitive advantage.

These include savings on rent and utilities, cleaning services, and property taxes. Companies also enjoy higher employee retention and increased productivity.

There are some downsides to this style of work. One of them is data security because employees often use their own systems, and there is no way to monitor security procedures.

If a data breach occurs, it could end up costing the company hundreds of thousands of dollars. Also, a data breach would cause the company to lose customer trust.

Monitoring computer systems at an employee’s home is more challenging than taking care of a company system in a centralized location.  

Companies can experience other potential savings, too. A recent study found that 34% of all employees said they would be willing to take up to a 5% pay cut if they would be allowed to work from home.

Another way that companies leveraged these savings in salaries was to offer the ability to work from home instead of a salary raise.

These are only a few ways companies can lower their expenses by allowing workers to work from home. The situation is different for every business, and it is important to weigh the savings against the risks.

10 Important Global Work from Home Statistics

  1. The U.S. Census Bureau found a divide among those who were able to work from home in terms of education, income, and health status.
  2. Of those with incomes of $200,00 or more, 73.1% switched to working from home during the pandemic compared to only 32.1% of those who made between $50,000 and $75,000.
  3. Higher incomes were found among those with higher income, and the U.S. Census Bureau found that those with a bachelor’s degree or higher were three times more likely to work from home during the pandemic than those with a high school diploma or GED.
  4. When asked to rank their health status, those who reported poor health status were less likely to work from home as opposed to those who reported excellent health status.
  5. As of 2019, nearly 68% of the global workforce reported working from home at least once a month.
  6. Even before the COVID-19 pandemic, working from home increased by 44% since 2016.
  7. In companies that allowed remote working, 55% were founders and C-level executives, and 48% were at the VP level.
  8. A Fundera study found that among remote workers below the executive level, 16% were managers, 14% were office and administrative support, and 13% were from the sales and business development departments.
  9. A pre-COVID-19 study by Owl Labs found that 18% of the workers were from the IT department, 9% were from finance, 14% were in customer service, and 11% were administrative and support staff.
  10. As of 2021, working from home accounts for over 60% of the U.S. economy.

remote working in usa economy


Key Takeaway: These statistics show a trend that should not be surprising considering the effects of the pandemic.

The idea of working from home was already on the rise before the pandemic hit. It is not surprising that there are many differences in the types of jobs that can be done at home and the industries that have the most remote workers.

Overall, these statistics show favorable results in productivity for those who can work from home.

working from home is more popular every year

Companies that allow working from home and flexible work schedules have an advantage in cost savings and an advantage when it comes to attracting and retaining the best employees.

Overview Of Remote Work Statistics

Industry Remote Workers
Percent Of Full-Time Workers Working Remotely 70%
Percent Of Companies Fully Remote 16%
Percent Of Remote Workers Who Are Happy 80%

4.7 million people work remotely at least half the time in the USA.

The idea of working from home has been around for several decades.

Although this possibility was available, only a few industries took advantage of it in the beginning.

But in 2020, the Coronavirus pandemic came along and changed the way people work and the way people think about work.

90% of employees say they were as productive or more working remotely when compared to the office in 2021.

16% of companies around the world are fully remote according to an Owl labs study.

During the Coronavirus, almost 70% of full-time workers are working from home.

Remote employees save an average of 40 minutes daily from commuting.

Let’s explore a few of the findings and trends that this past year has taught us about work.

Does working from home increase productivity?

Many companies had fears that workers would become lazy and unproductive if they were allowed to work from home. This mindset came from the traditional workplace where the office was for work, and home was for relaxing.

They feared that workers would not be able to get into a work mindset at home and that their company would suffer for it. There was a sense that workers needed to be monitored and controlled to get work done.

Studies on productivity among workers found that in most cases, these fears were unfounded. A Stanford study of 16,000 workers found that working from home increased their productivity by 13%. The study involved call center workers.

Workers attributed the increase in productivity to the ability to take more calls per hour due to a quieter work environment. They also took fewer breaks and needed fewer sick days.

Another study reflected similar trends and found that at least 77% who work from home said that they experienced at least some increase in productivity when compared to doing the same work at the office. In the same study, at least 30% said they could get more done in less time.

working from home increases productivity

What percentage of jobs are work from home?

It shouldn't be surprising that only certain jobs can be done from home. Many types of call center jobs and office work can be done more easily from home.

In a study by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, it was found that 37% of workers in financial operations, management, and business were more likely to do some of all of their work from home.

Those in professional occupations were 33% more likely to work from home. These were the occupations with the highest number of workers doing at least some of their work from home.

Do companies save money with remote employees?

Companies that allow all their employees to work from home full-time enjoy several business savings and benefits that can increase their competitive advantage.

These include savings on rent and utilities, cleaning services, and property taxes. Companies also enjoy higher employee retention and increased productivity.

There are some downsides to this style of work. One of them is data security because employees often use their own systems, and there is no way to monitor security procedures.

If a data breach occurs, it could end up costing the company hundreds of thousands of dollars. Also, a data breach would cause the company to lose customer trust.

Monitoring computer systems at an employee’s home is more challenging than taking care of a company system in a centralized location.  

Companies can experience other potential savings, too. A recent study found that 34% of all employees said they would be willing to take up to a 5% pay cut if they would be allowed to work from home.

Another way that companies leveraged these savings in salaries was to offer the ability to work from home instead of a salary raise.

These are only a few ways companies can lower their expenses by allowing workers to work from home. The situation is different for every business, and it is important to weigh the savings against the risks.

10 Important Global Work from Home Statistics

  1. The U.S. Census Bureau found a divide among those who were able to work from home in terms of education, income, and health status.
  2. Of those with incomes of $200,00 or more, 73.1% switched to working from home during the pandemic compared to only 32.1% of those who made between $50,000 and $75,000.
  3. Higher incomes were found among those with higher income, and the U.S. Census Bureau found that those with a bachelor’s degree or higher were three times more likely to work from home during the pandemic than those with a high school diploma or GED.
  4. When asked to rank their health status, those who reported poor health status were less likely to work from home as opposed to those who reported excellent health status.
  5. As of 2019, nearly 68% of the global workforce reported working from home at least once a month.
  6. Even before the COVID-19 pandemic, working from home increased by 44% since 2016.
  7. In companies that allowed remote working, 55% were founders and C-level executives, and 48% were at the VP level.
  8. A Fundera study found that among remote workers below the executive level, 16% were managers, 14% were office and administrative support, and 13% were from the sales and business development departments.
  9. A pre-COVID-19 study by Owl Labs found that 18% of the workers were from the IT department, 9% were from finance, 14% were in customer service, and 11% were administrative and support staff.
  10. As of 2021, working from home accounts for over 60% of the U.S. economy.

remote working in usa economy


Key Takeaway: These statistics show a trend that should not be surprising considering the effects of the pandemic.

The idea of working from home was already on the rise before the pandemic hit. It is not surprising that there are many differences in the types of jobs that can be done at home and the industries that have the most remote workers.

Overall, these statistics show favorable results in productivity for those who can work from home.

working from home is more popular every year

Companies that allow working from home and flexible work schedules have an advantage in cost savings and an advantage when it comes to attracting and retaining the best employees.

Overview Of Remote Work Statistics

Industry Remote Workers
Percent Of Full-Time Workers Working Remotely 70%
Percent Of Companies Fully Remote 16%
Percent Of Remote Workers Who Are Happy 80%

4.7 million people work remotely at least half the time in the USA.

The idea of working from home has been around for several decades.

Although this possibility was available, only a few industries took advantage of it in the beginning.

But in 2020, the Coronavirus pandemic came along and changed the way people work and the way people think about work.

90% of employees say they were as productive or more working remotely when compared to the office in 2021.

16% of companies around the world are fully remote according to an Owl labs study.

During the Coronavirus, almost 70% of full-time workers are working from home.

Remote employees save an average of 40 minutes daily from commuting.

Let’s explore a few of the findings and trends that this past year has taught us about work.

Does working from home increase productivity?

Many companies had fears that workers would become lazy and unproductive if they were allowed to work from home. This mindset came from the traditional workplace where the office was for work, and home was for relaxing.

They feared that workers would not be able to get into a work mindset at home and that their company would suffer for it. There was a sense that workers needed to be monitored and controlled to get work done.

Studies on productivity among workers found that in most cases, these fears were unfounded. A Stanford study of 16,000 workers found that working from home increased their productivity by 13%. The study involved call center workers.

Workers attributed the increase in productivity to the ability to take more calls per hour due to a quieter work environment. They also took fewer breaks and needed fewer sick days.

Another study reflected similar trends and found that at least 77% who work from home said that they experienced at least some increase in productivity when compared to doing the same work at the office. In the same study, at least 30% said they could get more done in less time.

working from home increases productivity

What percentage of jobs are work from home?

It shouldn't be surprising that only certain jobs can be done from home. Many types of call center jobs and office work can be done more easily from home.

In a study by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, it was found that 37% of workers in financial operations, management, and business were more likely to do some of all of their work from home.

Those in professional occupations were 33% more likely to work from home. These were the occupations with the highest number of workers doing at least some of their work from home.

Do companies save money with remote employees?

Companies that allow all their employees to work from home full-time enjoy several business savings and benefits that can increase their competitive advantage.

These include savings on rent and utilities, cleaning services, and property taxes. Companies also enjoy higher employee retention and increased productivity.

There are some downsides to this style of work. One of them is data security because employees often use their own systems, and there is no way to monitor security procedures.

If a data breach occurs, it could end up costing the company hundreds of thousands of dollars. Also, a data breach would cause the company to lose customer trust.

Monitoring computer systems at an employee’s home is more challenging than taking care of a company system in a centralized location.  

Companies can experience other potential savings, too. A recent study found that 34% of all employees said they would be willing to take up to a 5% pay cut if they would be allowed to work from home.

Another way that companies leveraged these savings in salaries was to offer the ability to work from home instead of a salary raise.

These are only a few ways companies can lower their expenses by allowing workers to work from home. The situation is different for every business, and it is important to weigh the savings against the risks.

10 Important Global Work from Home Statistics

  1. The U.S. Census Bureau found a divide among those who were able to work from home in terms of education, income, and health status.
  2. Of those with incomes of $200,00 or more, 73.1% switched to working from home during the pandemic compared to only 32.1% of those who made between $50,000 and $75,000.
  3. Higher incomes were found among those with higher income, and the U.S. Census Bureau found that those with a bachelor’s degree or higher were three times more likely to work from home during the pandemic than those with a high school diploma or GED.
  4. When asked to rank their health status, those who reported poor health status were less likely to work from home as opposed to those who reported excellent health status.
  5. As of 2019, nearly 68% of the global workforce reported working from home at least once a month.
  6. Even before the COVID-19 pandemic, working from home increased by 44% since 2016.
  7. In companies that allowed remote working, 55% were founders and C-level executives, and 48% were at the VP level.
  8. A Fundera study found that among remote workers below the executive level, 16% were managers, 14% were office and administrative support, and 13% were from the sales and business development departments.
  9. A pre-COVID-19 study by Owl Labs found that 18% of the workers were from the IT department, 9% were from finance, 14% were in customer service, and 11% were administrative and support staff.
  10. As of 2021, working from home accounts for over 60% of the U.S. economy.

remote working in usa economy


Key Takeaway: These statistics show a trend that should not be surprising considering the effects of the pandemic.

The idea of working from home was already on the rise before the pandemic hit. It is not surprising that there are many differences in the types of jobs that can be done at home and the industries that have the most remote workers.

Overall, these statistics show favorable results in productivity for those who can work from home.

working from home is more popular every year

Companies that allow working from home and flexible work schedules have an advantage in cost savings and an advantage when it comes to attracting and retaining the best employees.

Overview Of Remote Work Statistics

Industry Remote Workers
Percent Of Full-Time Workers Working Remotely 70%
Percent Of Companies Fully Remote 16%
Percent Of Remote Workers Who Are Happy 80%

4.7 million people work remotely at least half the time in the USA.

The idea of working from home has been around for several decades.

Although this possibility was available, only a few industries took advantage of it in the beginning.

But in 2020, the Coronavirus pandemic came along and changed the way people work and the way people think about work.

90% of employees say they were as productive or more working remotely when compared to the office in 2021.

16% of companies around the world are fully remote according to an Owl labs study.

During the Coronavirus, almost 70% of full-time workers are working from home.

Remote employees save an average of 40 minutes daily from commuting.

Let’s explore a few of the findings and trends that this past year has taught us about work.

Does working from home increase productivity?

Many companies had fears that workers would become lazy and unproductive if they were allowed to work from home. This mindset came from the traditional workplace where the office was for work, and home was for relaxing.

They feared that workers would not be able to get into a work mindset at home and that their company would suffer for it. There was a sense that workers needed to be monitored and controlled to get work done.

Studies on productivity among workers found that in most cases, these fears were unfounded. A Stanford study of 16,000 workers found that working from home increased their productivity by 13%. The study involved call center workers.

Workers attributed the increase in productivity to the ability to take more calls per hour due to a quieter work environment. They also took fewer breaks and needed fewer sick days.

Another study reflected similar trends and found that at least 77% who work from home said that they experienced at least some increase in productivity when compared to doing the same work at the office. In the same study, at least 30% said they could get more done in less time.

working from home increases productivity

What percentage of jobs are work from home?

It shouldn't be surprising that only certain jobs can be done from home. Many types of call center jobs and office work can be done more easily from home.

In a study by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, it was found that 37% of workers in financial operations, management, and business were more likely to do some of all of their work from home.

Those in professional occupations were 33% more likely to work from home. These were the occupations with the highest number of workers doing at least some of their work from home.

Do companies save money with remote employees?

Companies that allow all their employees to work from home full-time enjoy several business savings and benefits that can increase their competitive advantage.

These include savings on rent and utilities, cleaning services, and property taxes. Companies also enjoy higher employee retention and increased productivity.

There are some downsides to this style of work. One of them is data security because employees often use their own systems, and there is no way to monitor security procedures.

If a data breach occurs, it could end up costing the company hundreds of thousands of dollars. Also, a data breach would cause the company to lose customer trust.

Monitoring computer systems at an employee’s home is more challenging than taking care of a company system in a centralized location.  

Companies can experience other potential savings, too. A recent study found that 34% of all employees said they would be willing to take up to a 5% pay cut if they would be allowed to work from home.

Another way that companies leveraged these savings in salaries was to offer the ability to work from home instead of a salary raise.

These are only a few ways companies can lower their expenses by allowing workers to work from home. The situation is different for every business, and it is important to weigh the savings against the risks.

10 Important Global Work from Home Statistics

  1. The U.S. Census Bureau found a divide among those who were able to work from home in terms of education, income, and health status.
  2. Of those with incomes of $200,00 or more, 73.1% switched to working from home during the pandemic compared to only 32.1% of those who made between $50,000 and $75,000.
  3. Higher incomes were found among those with higher income, and the U.S. Census Bureau found that those with a bachelor’s degree or higher were three times more likely to work from home during the pandemic than those with a high school diploma or GED.
  4. When asked to rank their health status, those who reported poor health status were less likely to work from home as opposed to those who reported excellent health status.
  5. As of 2019, nearly 68% of the global workforce reported working from home at least once a month.
  6. Even before the COVID-19 pandemic, working from home increased by 44% since 2016.
  7. In companies that allowed remote working, 55% were founders and C-level executives, and 48% were at the VP level.
  8. A Fundera study found that among remote workers below the executive level, 16% were managers, 14% were office and administrative support, and 13% were from the sales and business development departments.
  9. A pre-COVID-19 study by Owl Labs found that 18% of the workers were from the IT department, 9% were from finance, 14% were in customer service, and 11% were administrative and support staff.
  10. As of 2021, working from home accounts for over 60% of the U.S. economy.

remote working in usa economy


Key Takeaway: These statistics show a trend that should not be surprising considering the effects of the pandemic.

The idea of working from home was already on the rise before the pandemic hit. It is not surprising that there are many differences in the types of jobs that can be done at home and the industries that have the most remote workers.

Overall, these statistics show favorable results in productivity for those who can work from home.

working from home is more popular every year

Companies that allow working from home and flexible work schedules have an advantage in cost savings and an advantage when it comes to attracting and retaining the best employees.

Overview Of Remote Work Statistics

Industry Remote Workers
Percent Of Full-Time Workers Working Remotely 70%
Percent Of Companies Fully Remote 16%
Percent Of Remote Workers Who Are Happy 80%

4.7 million people work remotely at least half the time in the USA.

The idea of working from home has been around for several decades.

Although this possibility was available, only a few industries took advantage of it in the beginning.

But in 2020, the Coronavirus pandemic came along and changed the way people work and the way people think about work.

90% of employees say they were as productive or more working remotely when compared to the office in 2021.

16% of companies around the world are fully remote according to an Owl labs study.

During the Coronavirus, almost 70% of full-time workers are working from home.

Remote employees save an average of 40 minutes daily from commuting.

Let’s explore a few of the findings and trends that this past year has taught us about work.

Does working from home increase productivity?

Many companies had fears that workers would become lazy and unproductive if they were allowed to work from home. This mindset came from the traditional workplace where the office was for work, and home was for relaxing.

They feared that workers would not be able to get into a work mindset at home and that their company would suffer for it. There was a sense that workers needed to be monitored and controlled to get work done.

Studies on productivity among workers found that in most cases, these fears were unfounded. A Stanford study of 16,000 workers found that working from home increased their productivity by 13%. The study involved call center workers.

Workers attributed the increase in productivity to the ability to take more calls per hour due to a quieter work environment. They also took fewer breaks and needed fewer sick days.

Another study reflected similar trends and found that at least 77% who work from home said that they experienced at least some increase in productivity when compared to doing the same work at the office. In the same study, at least 30% said they could get more done in less time.

working from home increases productivity

What percentage of jobs are work from home?

It shouldn't be surprising that only certain jobs can be done from home. Many types of call center jobs and office work can be done more easily from home.

In a study by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, it was found that 37% of workers in financial operations, management, and business were more likely to do some of all of their work from home.

Those in professional occupations were 33% more likely to work from home. These were the occupations with the highest number of workers doing at least some of their work from home.

Do companies save money with remote employees?

Companies that allow all their employees to work from home full-time enjoy several business savings and benefits that can increase their competitive advantage.

These include savings on rent and utilities, cleaning services, and property taxes. Companies also enjoy higher employee retention and increased productivity.

There are some downsides to this style of work. One of them is data security because employees often use their own systems, and there is no way to monitor security procedures.

If a data breach occurs, it could end up costing the company hundreds of thousands of dollars. Also, a data breach would cause the company to lose customer trust.

Monitoring computer systems at an employee’s home is more challenging than taking care of a company system in a centralized location.  

Companies can experience other potential savings, too. A recent study found that 34% of all employees said they would be willing to take up to a 5% pay cut if they would be allowed to work from home.

Another way that companies leveraged these savings in salaries was to offer the ability to work from home instead of a salary raise.

These are only a few ways companies can lower their expenses by allowing workers to work from home. The situation is different for every business, and it is important to weigh the savings against the risks.

10 Important Global Work from Home Statistics

  1. The U.S. Census Bureau found a divide among those who were able to work from home in terms of education, income, and health status.
  2. Of those with incomes of $200,00 or more, 73.1% switched to working from home during the pandemic compared to only 32.1% of those who made between $50,000 and $75,000.
  3. Higher incomes were found among those with higher income, and the U.S. Census Bureau found that those with a bachelor’s degree or higher were three times more likely to work from home during the pandemic than those with a high school diploma or GED.
  4. When asked to rank their health status, those who reported poor health status were less likely to work from home as opposed to those who reported excellent health status.
  5. As of 2019, nearly 68% of the global workforce reported working from home at least once a month.
  6. Even before the COVID-19 pandemic, working from home increased by 44% since 2016.
  7. In companies that allowed remote working, 55% were founders and C-level executives, and 48% were at the VP level.
  8. A Fundera study found that among remote workers below the executive level, 16% were managers, 14% were office and administrative support, and 13% were from the sales and business development departments.
  9. A pre-COVID-19 study by Owl Labs found that 18% of the workers were from the IT department, 9% were from finance, 14% were in customer service, and 11% were administrative and support staff.
  10. As of 2021, working from home accounts for over 60% of the U.S. economy.

remote working in usa economy


Key Takeaway: These statistics show a trend that should not be surprising considering the effects of the pandemic.

The idea of working from home was already on the rise before the pandemic hit. It is not surprising that there are many differences in the types of jobs that can be done at home and the industries that have the most remote workers.

Overall, these statistics show favorable results in productivity for those who can work from home.

working from home is more popular every year

Companies that allow working from home and flexible work schedules have an advantage in cost savings and an advantage when it comes to attracting and retaining the best employees.

Overview Of Remote Work Statistics

Industry Remote Workers
Percent Of Full-Time Workers Working Remotely 70%
Percent Of Companies Fully Remote 16%
Percent Of Remote Workers Who Are Happy 80%

4.7 million people work remotely at least half the time in the USA.

The idea of working from home has been around for several decades.

Although this possibility was available, only a few industries took advantage of it in the beginning.

But in 2020, the Coronavirus pandemic came along and changed the way people work and the way people think about work.

90% of employees say they were as productive or more working remotely when compared to the office in 2021.

16% of companies around the world are fully remote according to an Owl labs study.

During the Coronavirus, almost 70% of full-time workers are working from home.

Remote employees save an average of 40 minutes daily from commuting.

Let’s explore a few of the findings and trends that this past year has taught us about work.

Does working from home increase productivity?

Many companies had fears that workers would become lazy and unproductive if they were allowed to work from home. This mindset came from the traditional workplace where the office was for work, and home was for relaxing.

They feared that workers would not be able to get into a work mindset at home and that their company would suffer for it. There was a sense that workers needed to be monitored and controlled to get work done.

Studies on productivity among workers found that in most cases, these fears were unfounded. A Stanford study of 16,000 workers found that working from home increased their productivity by 13%. The study involved call center workers.

Workers attributed the increase in productivity to the ability to take more calls per hour due to a quieter work environment. They also took fewer breaks and needed fewer sick days.

Another study reflected similar trends and found that at least 77% who work from home said that they experienced at least some increase in productivity when compared to doing the same work at the office. In the same study, at least 30% said they could get more done in less time.

working from home increases productivity

What percentage of jobs are work from home?

It shouldn't be surprising that only certain jobs can be done from home. Many types of call center jobs and office work can be done more easily from home.

In a study by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, it was found that 37% of workers in financial operations, management, and business were more likely to do some of all of their work from home.

Those in professional occupations were 33% more likely to work from home. These were the occupations with the highest number of workers doing at least some of their work from home.

Do companies save money with remote employees?

Companies that allow all their employees to work from home full-time enjoy several business savings and benefits that can increase their competitive advantage.

These include savings on rent and utilities, cleaning services, and property taxes. Companies also enjoy higher employee retention and increased productivity.

There are some downsides to this style of work. One of them is data security because employees often use their own systems, and there is no way to monitor security procedures.

If a data breach occurs, it could end up costing the company hundreds of thousands of dollars. Also, a data breach would cause the company to lose customer trust.

Monitoring computer systems at an employee’s home is more challenging than taking care of a company system in a centralized location.  

Companies can experience other potential savings, too. A recent study found that 34% of all employees said they would be willing to take up to a 5% pay cut if they would be allowed to work from home.

Another way that companies leveraged these savings in salaries was to offer the ability to work from home instead of a salary raise.

These are only a few ways companies can lower their expenses by allowing workers to work from home. The situation is different for every business, and it is important to weigh the savings against the risks.

10 Important Global Work from Home Statistics

  1. The U.S. Census Bureau found a divide among those who were able to work from home in terms of education, income, and health status.
  2. Of those with incomes of $200,00 or more, 73.1% switched to working from home during the pandemic compared to only 32.1% of those who made between $50,000 and $75,000.
  3. Higher incomes were found among those with higher income, and the U.S. Census Bureau found that those with a bachelor’s degree or higher were three times more likely to work from home during the pandemic than those with a high school diploma or GED.
  4. When asked to rank their health status, those who reported poor health status were less likely to work from home as opposed to those who reported excellent health status.
  5. As of 2019, nearly 68% of the global workforce reported working from home at least once a month.
  6. Even before the COVID-19 pandemic, working from home increased by 44% since 2016.
  7. In companies that allowed remote working, 55% were founders and C-level executives, and 48% were at the VP level.
  8. A Fundera study found that among remote workers below the executive level, 16% were managers, 14% were office and administrative support, and 13% were from the sales and business development departments.
  9. A pre-COVID-19 study by Owl Labs found that 18% of the workers were from the IT department, 9% were from finance, 14% were in customer service, and 11% were administrative and support staff.
  10. As of 2021, working from home accounts for over 60% of the U.S. economy.

remote working in usa economy


Key Takeaway: These statistics show a trend that should not be surprising considering the effects of the pandemic.

The idea of working from home was already on the rise before the pandemic hit. It is not surprising that there are many differences in the types of jobs that can be done at home and the industries that have the most remote workers.

Overall, these statistics show favorable results in productivity for those who can work from home.

working from home is more popular every year

Companies that allow working from home and flexible work schedules have an advantage in cost savings and an advantage when it comes to attracting and retaining the best employees.

Overview Of Remote Work Statistics

Industry Remote Workers
Percent Of Full-Time Workers Working Remotely 70%
Percent Of Companies Fully Remote 16%
Percent Of Remote Workers Who Are Happy 80%

4.7 million people work remotely at least half the time in the USA.

The idea of working from home has been around for several decades.

Although this possibility was available, only a few industries took advantage of it in the beginning.

But in 2020, the Coronavirus pandemic came along and changed the way people work and the way people think about work.

90% of employees say they were as productive or more working remotely when compared to the office in 2021.

16% of companies around the world are fully remote according to an Owl labs study.

During the Coronavirus, almost 70% of full-time workers are working from home.

Remote employees save an average of 40 minutes daily from commuting.

Let’s explore a few of the findings and trends that this past year has taught us about work.

Does working from home increase productivity?

Many companies had fears that workers would become lazy and unproductive if they were allowed to work from home. This mindset came from the traditional workplace where the office was for work, and home was for relaxing.

They feared that workers would not be able to get into a work mindset at home and that their company would suffer for it. There was a sense that workers needed to be monitored and controlled to get work done.

Studies on productivity among workers found that in most cases, these fears were unfounded. A Stanford study of 16,000 workers found that working from home increased their productivity by 13%. The study involved call center workers.

Workers attributed the increase in productivity to the ability to take more calls per hour due to a quieter work environment. They also took fewer breaks and needed fewer sick days.

Another study reflected similar trends and found that at least 77% who work from home said that they experienced at least some increase in productivity when compared to doing the same work at the office. In the same study, at least 30% said they could get more done in less time.

working from home increases productivity

What percentage of jobs are work from home?

It shouldn't be surprising that only certain jobs can be done from home. Many types of call center jobs and office work can be done more easily from home.

In a study by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, it was found that 37% of workers in financial operations, management, and business were more likely to do some of all of their work from home.

Those in professional occupations were 33% more likely to work from home. These were the occupations with the highest number of workers doing at least some of their work from home.

Do companies save money with remote employees?

Companies that allow all their employees to work from home full-time enjoy several business savings and benefits that can increase their competitive advantage.

These include savings on rent and utilities, cleaning services, and property taxes. Companies also enjoy higher employee retention and increased productivity.

There are some downsides to this style of work. One of them is data security because employees often use their own systems, and there is no way to monitor security procedures.

If a data breach occurs, it could end up costing the company hundreds of thousands of dollars. Also, a data breach would cause the company to lose customer trust.

Monitoring computer systems at an employee’s home is more challenging than taking care of a company system in a centralized location.  

Companies can experience other potential savings, too. A recent study found that 34% of all employees said they would be willing to take up to a 5% pay cut if they would be allowed to work from home.

Another way that companies leveraged these savings in salaries was to offer the ability to work from home instead of a salary raise.

These are only a few ways companies can lower their expenses by allowing workers to work from home. The situation is different for every business, and it is important to weigh the savings against the risks.

10 Important Global Work from Home Statistics

  1. The U.S. Census Bureau found a divide among those who were able to work from home in terms of education, income, and health status.
  2. Of those with incomes of $200,00 or more, 73.1% switched to working from home during the pandemic compared to only 32.1% of those who made between $50,000 and $75,000.
  3. Higher incomes were found among those with higher income, and the U.S. Census Bureau found that those with a bachelor’s degree or higher were three times more likely to work from home during the pandemic than those with a high school diploma or GED.
  4. When asked to rank their health status, those who reported poor health status were less likely to work from home as opposed to those who reported excellent health status.
  5. As of 2019, nearly 68% of the global workforce reported working from home at least once a month.
  6. Even before the COVID-19 pandemic, working from home increased by 44% since 2016.
  7. In companies that allowed remote working, 55% were founders and C-level executives, and 48% were at the VP level.
  8. A Fundera study found that among remote workers below the executive level, 16% were managers, 14% were office and administrative support, and 13% were from the sales and business development departments.
  9. A pre-COVID-19 study by Owl Labs found that 18% of the workers were from the IT department, 9% were from finance, 14% were in customer service, and 11% were administrative and support staff.
  10. As of 2021, working from home accounts for over 60% of the U.S. economy.

remote working in usa economy


Key Takeaway: These statistics show a trend that should not be surprising considering the effects of the pandemic.

The idea of working from home was already on the rise before the pandemic hit. It is not surprising that there are many differences in the types of jobs that can be done at home and the industries that have the most remote workers.

Overall, these statistics show favorable results in productivity for those who can work from home.

working from home is more popular every year

Companies that allow working from home and flexible work schedules have an advantage in cost savings and an advantage when it comes to attracting and retaining the best employees.

Overview Of Remote Work Statistics

Industry Remote Workers
Percent Of Full-Time Workers Working Remotely 70%
Percent Of Companies Fully Remote 16%
Percent Of Remote Workers Who Are Happy 80%

4.7 million people work remotely at least half the time in the USA.

The idea of working from home has been around for several decades.

Although this possibility was available, only a few industries took advantage of it in the beginning.

But in 2020, the Coronavirus pandemic came along and changed the way people work and the way people think about work.

90% of employees say they were as productive or more working remotely when compared to the office in 2021.

16% of companies around the world are fully remote according to an Owl labs study.

During the Coronavirus, almost 70% of full-time workers are working from home.

Remote employees save an average of 40 minutes daily from commuting.

Let’s explore a few of the findings and trends that this past year has taught us about work.

Does working from home increase productivity?

Many companies had fears that workers would become lazy and unproductive if they were allowed to work from home. This mindset came from the traditional workplace where the office was for work, and home was for relaxing.

They feared that workers would not be able to get into a work mindset at home and that their company would suffer for it. There was a sense that workers needed to be monitored and controlled to get work done.

Studies on productivity among workers found that in most cases, these fears were unfounded. A Stanford study of 16,000 workers found that working from home increased their productivity by 13%. The study involved call center workers.

Workers attributed the increase in productivity to the ability to take more calls per hour due to a quieter work environment. They also took fewer breaks and needed fewer sick days.

Another study reflected similar trends and found that at least 77% who work from home said that they experienced at least some increase in productivity when compared to doing the same work at the office. In the same study, at least 30% said they could get more done in less time.

working from home increases productivity

What percentage of jobs are work from home?

It shouldn't be surprising that only certain jobs can be done from home. Many types of call center jobs and office work can be done more easily from home.

In a study by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, it was found that 37% of workers in financial operations, management, and business were more likely to do some of all of their work from home.

Those in professional occupations were 33% more likely to work from home. These were the occupations with the highest number of workers doing at least some of their work from home.

Do companies save money with remote employees?

Companies that allow all their employees to work from home full-time enjoy several business savings and benefits that can increase their competitive advantage.

These include savings on rent and utilities, cleaning services, and property taxes. Companies also enjoy higher employee retention and increased productivity.

There are some downsides to this style of work. One of them is data security because employees often use their own systems, and there is no way to monitor security procedures.

If a data breach occurs, it could end up costing the company hundreds of thousands of dollars. Also, a data breach would cause the company to lose customer trust.

Monitoring computer systems at an employee’s home is more challenging than taking care of a company system in a centralized location.  

Companies can experience other potential savings, too. A recent study found that 34% of all employees said they would be willing to take up to a 5% pay cut if they would be allowed to work from home.

Another way that companies leveraged these savings in salaries was to offer the ability to work from home instead of a salary raise.

These are only a few ways companies can lower their expenses by allowing workers to work from home. The situation is different for every business, and it is important to weigh the savings against the risks.

10 Important Global Work from Home Statistics

  1. The U.S. Census Bureau found a divide among those who were able to work from home in terms of education, income, and health status.
  2. Of those with incomes of $200,00 or more, 73.1% switched to working from home during the pandemic compared to only 32.1% of those who made between $50,000 and $75,000.
  3. Higher incomes were found among those with higher income, and the U.S. Census Bureau found that those with a bachelor’s degree or higher were three times more likely to work from home during the pandemic than those with a high school diploma or GED.
  4. When asked to rank their health status, those who reported poor health status were less likely to work from home as opposed to those who reported excellent health status.
  5. As of 2019, nearly 68% of the global workforce reported working from home at least once a month.
  6. Even before the COVID-19 pandemic, working from home increased by 44% since 2016.
  7. In companies that allowed remote working, 55% were founders and C-level executives, and 48% were at the VP level.
  8. A Fundera study found that among remote workers below the executive level, 16% were managers, 14% were office and administrative support, and 13% were from the sales and business development departments.
  9. A pre-COVID-19 study by Owl Labs found that 18% of the workers were from the IT department, 9% were from finance, 14% were in customer service, and 11% were administrative and support staff.
  10. As of 2021, working from home accounts for over 60% of the U.S. economy.

remote working in usa economy


Key Takeaway: These statistics show a trend that should not be surprising considering the effects of the pandemic.

The idea of working from home was already on the rise before the pandemic hit. It is not surprising that there are many differences in the types of jobs that can be done at home and the industries that have the most remote workers.

Overall, these statistics show favorable results in productivity for those who can work from home.

working from home is more popular every year

Companies that allow working from home and flexible work schedules have an advantage in cost savings and an advantage when it comes to attracting and retaining the best employees.

Overview Of Remote Work Statistics

Industry Remote Workers
Percent Of Full-Time Workers Working Remotely 70%
Percent Of Companies Fully Remote 16%
Percent Of Remote Workers Who Are Happy 80%

4.7 million people work remotely at least half the time in the USA.

The idea of working from home has been around for several decades.

Although this possibility was available, only a few industries took advantage of it in the beginning.

But in 2020, the Coronavirus pandemic came along and changed the way people work and the way people think about work.

90% of employees say they were as productive or more working remotely when compared to the office in 2021.

16% of companies around the world are fully remote according to an Owl labs study.

During the Coronavirus, almost 70% of full-time workers are working from home.

Remote employees save an average of 40 minutes daily from commuting.

Let’s explore a few of the findings and trends that this past year has taught us about work.

Does working from home increase productivity?

Many companies had fears that workers would become lazy and unproductive if they were allowed to work from home. This mindset came from the traditional workplace where the office was for work, and home was for relaxing.

They feared that workers would not be able to get into a work mindset at home and that their company would suffer for it. There was a sense that workers needed to be monitored and controlled to get work done.

Studies on productivity among workers found that in most cases, these fears were unfounded. A Stanford study of 16,000 workers found that working from home increased their productivity by 13%. The study involved call center workers.

Workers attributed the increase in productivity to the ability to take more calls per hour due to a quieter work environment. They also took fewer breaks and needed fewer sick days.

Another study reflected similar trends and found that at least 77% who work from home said that they experienced at least some increase in productivity when compared to doing the same work at the office. In the same study, at least 30% said they could get more done in less time.

working from home increases productivity

What percentage of jobs are work from home?

It shouldn't be surprising that only certain jobs can be done from home. Many types of call center jobs and office work can be done more easily from home.

In a study by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, it was found that 37% of workers in financial operations, management, and business were more likely to do some of all of their work from home.

Those in professional occupations were 33% more likely to work from home. These were the occupations with the highest number of workers doing at least some of their work from home.

Do companies save money with remote employees?

Companies that allow all their employees to work from home full-time enjoy several business savings and benefits that can increase their competitive advantage.

These include savings on rent and utilities, cleaning services, and property taxes. Companies also enjoy higher employee retention and increased productivity.

There are some downsides to this style of work. One of them is data security because employees often use their own systems, and there is no way to monitor security procedures.

If a data breach occurs, it could end up costing the company hundreds of thousands of dollars. Also, a data breach would cause the company to lose customer trust.

Monitoring computer systems at an employee’s home is more challenging than taking care of a company system in a centralized location.  

Companies can experience other potential savings, too. A recent study found that 34% of all employees said they would be willing to take up to a 5% pay cut if they would be allowed to work from home.

Another way that companies leveraged these savings in salaries was to offer the ability to work from home instead of a salary raise.

These are only a few ways companies can lower their expenses by allowing workers to work from home. The situation is different for every business, and it is important to weigh the savings against the risks.

10 Important Global Work from Home Statistics

  1. The U.S. Census Bureau found a divide among those who were able to work from home in terms of education, income, and health status.
  2. Of those with incomes of $200,00 or more, 73.1% switched to working from home during the pandemic compared to only 32.1% of those who made between $50,000 and $75,000.
  3. Higher incomes were found among those with higher income, and the U.S. Census Bureau found that those with a bachelor’s degree or higher were three times more likely to work from home during the pandemic than those with a high school diploma or GED.
  4. When asked to rank their health status, those who reported poor health status were less likely to work from home as opposed to those who reported excellent health status.
  5. As of 2019, nearly 68% of the global workforce reported working from home at least once a month.
  6. Even before the COVID-19 pandemic, working from home increased by 44% since 2016.
  7. In companies that allowed remote working, 55% were founders and C-level executives, and 48% were at the VP level.
  8. A Fundera study found that among remote workers below the executive level, 16% were managers, 14% were office and administrative support, and 13% were from the sales and business development departments.
  9. A pre-COVID-19 study by Owl Labs found that 18% of the workers were from the IT department, 9% were from finance, 14% were in customer service, and 11% were administrative and support staff.
  10. As of 2021, working from home accounts for over 60% of the U.S. economy.

remote working in usa economy


Key Takeaway: These statistics show a trend that should not be surprising considering the effects of the pandemic.

The idea of working from home was already on the rise before the pandemic hit. It is not surprising that there are many differences in the types of jobs that can be done at home and the industries that have the most remote workers.

Overall, these statistics show favorable results in productivity for those who can work from home.

working from home is more popular every year

Companies that allow working from home and flexible work schedules have an advantage in cost savings and an advantage when it comes to attracting and retaining the best employees.

Overview Of Remote Work Statistics

Industry Remote Workers
Percent Of Full-Time Workers Working Remotely 70%
Percent Of Companies Fully Remote 16%
Percent Of Remote Workers Who Are Happy 80%

4.7 million people work remotely at least half the time in the USA.

The idea of working from home has been around for several decades.

Although this possibility was available, only a few industries took advantage of it in the beginning.

But in 2020, the Coronavirus pandemic came along and changed the way people work and the way people think about work.

90% of employees say they were as productive or more working remotely when compared to the office in 2021.

16% of companies around the world are fully remote according to an Owl labs study.

During the Coronavirus, almost 70% of full-time workers are working from home.

Remote employees save an average of 40 minutes daily from commuting.

Let’s explore a few of the findings and trends that this past year has taught us about work.

Does working from home increase productivity?

Many companies had fears that workers would become lazy and unproductive if they were allowed to work from home. This mindset came from the traditional workplace where the office was for work, and home was for relaxing.

They feared that workers would not be able to get into a work mindset at home and that their company would suffer for it. There was a sense that workers needed to be monitored and controlled to get work done.

Studies on productivity among workers found that in most cases, these fears were unfounded. A Stanford study of 16,000 workers found that working from home increased their productivity by 13%. The study involved call center workers.

Workers attributed the increase in productivity to the ability to take more calls per hour due to a quieter work environment. They also took fewer breaks and needed fewer sick days.

Another study reflected similar trends and found that at least 77% who work from home said that they experienced at least some increase in productivity when compared to doing the same work at the office. In the same study, at least 30% said they could get more done in less time.

working from home increases productivity

What percentage of jobs are work from home?

It shouldn't be surprising that only certain jobs can be done from home. Many types of call center jobs and office work can be done more easily from home.

In a study by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, it was found that 37% of workers in financial operations, management, and business were more likely to do some of all of their work from home.

Those in professional occupations were 33% more likely to work from home. These were the occupations with the highest number of workers doing at least some of their work from home.

Do companies save money with remote employees?

Companies that allow all their employees to work from home full-time enjoy several business savings and benefits that can increase their competitive advantage.

These include savings on rent and utilities, cleaning services, and property taxes. Companies also enjoy higher employee retention and increased productivity.

There are some downsides to this style of work. One of them is data security because employees often use their own systems, and there is no way to monitor security procedures.

If a data breach occurs, it could end up costing the company hundreds of thousands of dollars. Also, a data breach would cause the company to lose customer trust.

Monitoring computer systems at an employee’s home is more challenging than taking care of a company system in a centralized location.  

Companies can experience other potential savings, too. A recent study found that 34% of all employees said they would be willing to take up to a 5% pay cut if they would be allowed to work from home.

Another way that companies leveraged these savings in salaries was to offer the ability to work from home instead of a salary raise.

These are only a few ways companies can lower their expenses by allowing workers to work from home. The situation is different for every business, and it is important to weigh the savings against the risks.

10 Important Global Work from Home Statistics

  1. The U.S. Census Bureau found a divide among those who were able to work from home in terms of education, income, and health status.
  2. Of those with incomes of $200,00 or more, 73.1% switched to working from home during the pandemic compared to only 32.1% of those who made between $50,000 and $75,000.
  3. Higher incomes were found among those with higher income, and the U.S. Census Bureau found that those with a bachelor’s degree or higher were three times more likely to work from home during the pandemic than those with a high school diploma or GED.
  4. When asked to rank their health status, those who reported poor health status were less likely to work from home as opposed to those who reported excellent health status.
  5. As of 2019, nearly 68% of the global workforce reported working from home at least once a month.
  6. Even before the COVID-19 pandemic, working from home increased by 44% since 2016.
  7. In companies that allowed remote working, 55% were founders and C-level executives, and 48% were at the VP level.
  8. A Fundera study found that among remote workers below the executive level, 16% were managers, 14% were office and administrative support, and 13% were from the sales and business development departments.
  9. A pre-COVID-19 study by Owl Labs found that 18% of the workers were from the IT department, 9% were from finance, 14% were in customer service, and 11% were administrative and support staff.
  10. As of 2021, working from home accounts for over 60% of the U.S. economy.

remote working in usa economy


Key Takeaway: These statistics show a trend that should not be surprising considering the effects of the pandemic.

The idea of working from home was already on the rise before the pandemic hit. It is not surprising that there are many differences in the types of jobs that can be done at home and the industries that have the most remote workers.

Overall, these statistics show favorable results in productivity for those who can work from home.

working from home is more popular every year

Companies that allow working from home and flexible work schedules have an advantage in cost savings and an advantage when it comes to attracting and retaining the best employees.

Overview Of Remote Work Statistics

Industry Remote Workers
Percent Of Full-Time Workers Working Remotely 70%
Percent Of Companies Fully Remote 16%
Percent Of Remote Workers Who Are Happy 80%

4.7 million people work remotely at least half the time in the USA.

The idea of working from home has been around for several decades.

Although this possibility was available, only a few industries took advantage of it in the beginning.

But in 2020, the Coronavirus pandemic came along and changed the way people work and the way people think about work.

90% of employees say they were as productive or more working remotely when compared to the office in 2021.

16% of companies around the world are fully remote according to an Owl labs study.

During the Coronavirus, almost 70% of full-time workers are working from home.

Remote employees save an average of 40 minutes daily from commuting.

Let’s explore a few of the findings and trends that this past year has taught us about work.

Does working from home increase productivity?

Many companies had fears that workers would become lazy and unproductive if they were allowed to work from home. This mindset came from the traditional workplace where the office was for work, and home was for relaxing.

They feared that workers would not be able to get into a work mindset at home and that their company would suffer for it. There was a sense that workers needed to be monitored and controlled to get work done.

Studies on productivity among workers found that in most cases, these fears were unfounded. A Stanford study of 16,000 workers found that working from home increased their productivity by 13%. The study involved call center workers.

Workers attributed the increase in productivity to the ability to take more calls per hour due to a quieter work environment. They also took fewer breaks and needed fewer sick days.

Another study reflected similar trends and found that at least 77% who work from home said that they experienced at least some increase in productivity when compared to doing the same work at the office. In the same study, at least 30% said they could get more done in less time.

working from home increases productivity

What percentage of jobs are work from home?

It shouldn't be surprising that only certain jobs can be done from home. Many types of call center jobs and office work can be done more easily from home.

In a study by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, it was found that 37% of workers in financial operations, management, and business were more likely to do some of all of their work from home.

Those in professional occupations were 33% more likely to work from home. These were the occupations with the highest number of workers doing at least some of their work from home.

Do companies save money with remote employees?

Companies that allow all their employees to work from home full-time enjoy several business savings and benefits that can increase their competitive advantage.

These include savings on rent and utilities, cleaning services, and property taxes. Companies also enjoy higher employee retention and increased productivity.

There are some downsides to this style of work. One of them is data security because employees often use their own systems, and there is no way to monitor security procedures.

If a data breach occurs, it could end up costing the company hundreds of thousands of dollars. Also, a data breach would cause the company to lose customer trust.

Monitoring computer systems at an employee’s home is more challenging than taking care of a company system in a centralized location.  

Companies can experience other potential savings, too. A recent study found that 34% of all employees said they would be willing to take up to a 5% pay cut if they would be allowed to work from home.

Another way that companies leveraged these savings in salaries was to offer the ability to work from home instead of a salary raise.

These are only a few ways companies can lower their expenses by allowing workers to work from home. The situation is different for every business, and it is important to weigh the savings against the risks.

10 Important Global Work from Home Statistics

  1. The U.S. Census Bureau found a divide among those who were able to work from home in terms of education, income, and health status.
  2. Of those with incomes of $200,00 or more, 73.1% switched to working from home during the pandemic compared to only 32.1% of those who made between $50,000 and $75,000.
  3. Higher incomes were found among those with higher income, and the U.S. Census Bureau found that those with a bachelor’s degree or higher were three times more likely to work from home during the pandemic than those with a high school diploma or GED.
  4. When asked to rank their health status, those who reported poor health status were less likely to work from home as opposed to those who reported excellent health status.
  5. As of 2019, nearly 68% of the global workforce reported working from home at least once a month.
  6. Even before the COVID-19 pandemic, working from home increased by 44% since 2016.
  7. In companies that allowed remote working, 55% were founders and C-level executives, and 48% were at the VP level.
  8. A Fundera study found that among remote workers below the executive level, 16% were managers, 14% were office and administrative support, and 13% were from the sales and business development departments.
  9. A pre-COVID-19 study by Owl Labs found that 18% of the workers were from the IT department, 9% were from finance, 14% were in customer service, and 11% were administrative and support staff.
  10. As of 2021, working from home accounts for over 60% of the U.S. economy.

remote working in usa economy


Key Takeaway: These statistics show a trend that should not be surprising considering the effects of the pandemic.

The idea of working from home was already on the rise before the pandemic hit. It is not surprising that there are many differences in the types of jobs that can be done at home and the industries that have the most remote workers.

Overall, these statistics show favorable results in productivity for those who can work from home.

working from home is more popular every year

Companies that allow working from home and flexible work schedules have an advantage in cost savings and an advantage when it comes to attracting and retaining the best employees.

Overview Of Remote Work Statistics

Industry Remote Workers
Percent Of Full-Time Workers Working Remotely 70%
Percent Of Companies Fully Remote 16%
Percent Of Remote Workers Who Are Happy 80%

4.7 million people work remotely at least half the time in the USA.

The idea of working from home has been around for several decades.

Although this possibility was available, only a few industries took advantage of it in the beginning.

But in 2020, the Coronavirus pandemic came along and changed the way people work and the way people think about work.

90% of employees say they were as productive or more working remotely when compared to the office in 2021.

16% of companies around the world are fully remote according to an Owl labs study.

During the Coronavirus, almost 70% of full-time workers are working from home.

Remote employees save an average of 40 minutes daily from commuting.

Let’s explore a few of the findings and trends that this past year has taught us about work.

Does working from home increase productivity?

Many companies had fears that workers would become lazy and unproductive if they were allowed to work from home. This mindset came from the traditional workplace where the office was for work, and home was for relaxing.

They feared that workers would not be able to get into a work mindset at home and that their company would suffer for it. There was a sense that workers needed to be monitored and controlled to get work done.

Studies on productivity among workers found that in most cases, these fears were unfounded. A Stanford study of 16,000 workers found that working from home increased their productivity by 13%. The study involved call center workers.

Workers attributed the increase in productivity to the ability to take more calls per hour due to a quieter work environment. They also took fewer breaks and needed fewer sick days.

Another study reflected similar trends and found that at least 77% who work from home said that they experienced at least some increase in productivity when compared to doing the same work at the office. In the same study, at least 30% said they could get more done in less time.

working from home increases productivity

What percentage of jobs are work from home?

It shouldn't be surprising that only certain jobs can be done from home. Many types of call center jobs and office work can be done more easily from home.

In a study by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, it was found that 37% of workers in financial operations, management, and business were more likely to do some of all of their work from home.

Those in professional occupations were 33% more likely to work from home. These were the occupations with the highest number of workers doing at least some of their work from home.

Do companies save money with remote employees?

Companies that allow all their employees to work from home full-time enjoy several business savings and benefits that can increase their competitive advantage.

These include savings on rent and utilities, cleaning services, and property taxes. Companies also enjoy higher employee retention and increased productivity.

There are some downsides to this style of work. One of them is data security because employees often use their own systems, and there is no way to monitor security procedures.

If a data breach occurs, it could end up costing the company hundreds of thousands of dollars. Also, a data breach would cause the company to lose customer trust.

Monitoring computer systems at an employee’s home is more challenging than taking care of a company system in a centralized location.  

Companies can experience other potential savings, too. A recent study found that 34% of all employees said they would be willing to take up to a 5% pay cut if they would be allowed to work from home.

Another way that companies leveraged these savings in salaries was to offer the ability to work from home instead of a salary raise.

These are only a few ways companies can lower their expenses by allowing workers to work from home. The situation is different for every business, and it is important to weigh the savings against the risks.

10 Important Global Work from Home Statistics

  1. The U.S. Census Bureau found a divide among those who were able to work from home in terms of education, income, and health status.
  2. Of those with incomes of $200,00 or more, 73.1% switched to working from home during the pandemic compared to only 32.1% of those who made between $50,000 and $75,000.
  3. Higher incomes were found among those with higher income, and the U.S. Census Bureau found that those with a bachelor’s degree or higher were three times more likely to work from home during the pandemic than those with a high school diploma or GED.
  4. When asked to rank their health status, those who reported poor health status were less likely to work from home as opposed to those who reported excellent health status.
  5. As of 2019, nearly 68% of the global workforce reported working from home at least once a month.
  6. Even before the COVID-19 pandemic, working from home increased by 44% since 2016.
  7. In companies that allowed remote working, 55% were founders and C-level executives, and 48% were at the VP level.
  8. A Fundera study found that among remote workers below the executive level, 16% were managers, 14% were office and administrative support, and 13% were from the sales and business development departments.
  9. A pre-COVID-19 study by Owl Labs found that 18% of the workers were from the IT department, 9% were from finance, 14% were in customer service, and 11% were administrative and support staff.
  10. As of 2021, working from home accounts for over 60% of the U.S. economy.

remote working in usa economy


Key Takeaway: These statistics show a trend that should not be surprising considering the effects of the pandemic.

The idea of working from home was already on the rise before the pandemic hit. It is not surprising that there are many differences in the types of jobs that can be done at home and the industries that have the most remote workers.

Overall, these statistics show favorable results in productivity for those who can work from home.

working from home is more popular every year

Companies that allow working from home and flexible work schedules have an advantage in cost savings and an advantage when it comes to attracting and retaining the best employees.

Overview Of Remote Work Statistics

Industry Remote Workers
Percent Of Full-Time Workers Working Remotely 70%
Percent Of Companies Fully Remote 16%
Percent Of Remote Workers Who Are Happy 80%

4.7 million people work remotely at least half the time in the USA.

The idea of working from home has been around for several decades.

Although this possibility was available, only a few industries took advantage of it in the beginning.

But in 2020, the Coronavirus pandemic came along and changed the way people work and the way people think about work.

90% of employees say they were as productive or more working remotely when compared to the office in 2021.

16% of companies around the world are fully remote according to an Owl labs study.

During the Coronavirus, almost 70% of full-time workers are working from home.

Remote employees save an average of 40 minutes daily from commuting.

Let’s explore a few of the findings and trends that this past year has taught us about work.

Does working from home increase productivity?

Many companies had fears that workers would become lazy and unproductive if they were allowed to work from home. This mindset came from the traditional workplace where the office was for work, and home was for relaxing.

They feared that workers would not be able to get into a work mindset at home and that their company would suffer for it. There was a sense that workers needed to be monitored and controlled to get work done.

Studies on productivity among workers found that in most cases, these fears were unfounded. A Stanford study of 16,000 workers found that working from home increased their productivity by 13%. The study involved call center workers.

Workers attributed the increase in productivity to the ability to take more calls per hour due to a quieter work environment. They also took fewer breaks and needed fewer sick days.

Another study reflected similar trends and found that at least 77% who work from home said that they experienced at least some increase in productivity when compared to doing the same work at the office. In the same study, at least 30% said they could get more done in less time.

working from home increases productivity

What percentage of jobs are work from home?

It shouldn't be surprising that only certain jobs can be done from home. Many types of call center jobs and office work can be done more easily from home.

In a study by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, it was found that 37% of workers in financial operations, management, and business were more likely to do some of all of their work from home.

Those in professional occupations were 33% more likely to work from home. These were the occupations with the highest number of workers doing at least some of their work from home.

Do companies save money with remote employees?

Companies that allow all their employees to work from home full-time enjoy several business savings and benefits that can increase their competitive advantage.

These include savings on rent and utilities, cleaning services, and property taxes. Companies also enjoy higher employee retention and increased productivity.

There are some downsides to this style of work. One of them is data security because employees often use their own systems, and there is no way to monitor security procedures.

If a data breach occurs, it could end up costing the company hundreds of thousands of dollars. Also, a data breach would cause the company to lose customer trust.

Monitoring computer systems at an employee’s home is more challenging than taking care of a company system in a centralized location.  

Companies can experience other potential savings, too. A recent study found that 34% of all employees said they would be willing to take up to a 5% pay cut if they would be allowed to work from home.

Another way that companies leveraged these savings in salaries was to offer the ability to work from home instead of a salary raise.

These are only a few ways companies can lower their expenses by allowing workers to work from home. The situation is different for every business, and it is important to weigh the savings against the risks.

10 Important Global Work from Home Statistics

  1. The U.S. Census Bureau found a divide among those who were able to work from home in terms of education, income, and health status.
  2. Of those with incomes of $200,00 or more, 73.1% switched to working from home during the pandemic compared to only 32.1% of those who made between $50,000 and $75,000.
  3. Higher incomes were found among those with higher income, and the U.S. Census Bureau found that those with a bachelor’s degree or higher were three times more likely to work from home during the pandemic than those with a high school diploma or GED.
  4. When asked to rank their health status, those who reported poor health status were less likely to work from home as opposed to those who reported excellent health status.
  5. As of 2019, nearly 68% of the global workforce reported working from home at least once a month.
  6. Even before the COVID-19 pandemic, working from home increased by 44% since 2016.
  7. In companies that allowed remote working, 55% were founders and C-level executives, and 48% were at the VP level.
  8. A Fundera study found that among remote workers below the executive level, 16% were managers, 14% were office and administrative support, and 13% were from the sales and business development departments.
  9. A pre-COVID-19 study by Owl Labs found that 18% of the workers were from the IT department, 9% were from finance, 14% were in customer service, and 11% were administrative and support staff.
  10. As of 2021, working from home accounts for over 60% of the U.S. economy.

remote working in usa economy


Key Takeaway: These statistics show a trend that should not be surprising considering the effects of the pandemic.

The idea of working from home was already on the rise before the pandemic hit. It is not surprising that there are many differences in the types of jobs that can be done at home and the industries that have the most remote workers.

Overall, these statistics show favorable results in productivity for those who can work from home.

working from home is more popular every year

Companies that allow working from home and flexible work schedules have an advantage in cost savings and an advantage when it comes to attracting and retaining the best employees.

Overview Of Remote Work Statistics

Industry Remote Workers
Percent Of Full-Time Workers Working Remotely 70%
Percent Of Companies Fully Remote 16%
Percent Of Remote Workers Who Are Happy 80%

4.7 million people work remotely at least half the time in the USA.

The idea of working from home has been around for several decades.

Although this possibility was available, only a few industries took advantage of it in the beginning.

But in 2020, the Coronavirus pandemic came along and changed the way people work and the way people think about work.

90% of employees say they were as productive or more working remotely when compared to the office in 2021.

16% of companies around the world are fully remote according to an Owl labs study.

During the Coronavirus, almost 70% of full-time workers are working from home.

Remote employees save an average of 40 minutes daily from commuting.

Let’s explore a few of the findings and trends that this past year has taught us about work.

Does working from home increase productivity?

Many companies had fears that workers would become lazy and unproductive if they were allowed to work from home. This mindset came from the traditional workplace where the office was for work, and home was for relaxing.

They feared that workers would not be able to get into a work mindset at home and that their company would suffer for it. There was a sense that workers needed to be monitored and controlled to get work done.

Studies on productivity among workers found that in most cases, these fears were unfounded. A Stanford study of 16,000 workers found that working from home increased their productivity by 13%. The study involved call center workers.

Workers attributed the increase in productivity to the ability to take more calls per hour due to a quieter work environment. They also took fewer breaks and needed fewer sick days.

Another study reflected similar trends and found that at least 77% who work from home said that they experienced at least some increase in productivity when compared to doing the same work at the office. In the same study, at least 30% said they could get more done in less time.

working from home increases productivity

What percentage of jobs are work from home?

It shouldn't be surprising that only certain jobs can be done from home. Many types of call center jobs and office work can be done more easily from home.

In a study by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, it was found that 37% of workers in financial operations, management, and business were more likely to do some of all of their work from home.

Those in professional occupations were 33% more likely to work from home. These were the occupations with the highest number of workers doing at least some of their work from home.

Do companies save money with remote employees?

Companies that allow all their employees to work from home full-time enjoy several business savings and benefits that can increase their competitive advantage.

These include savings on rent and utilities, cleaning services, and property taxes. Companies also enjoy higher employee retention and increased productivity.

There are some downsides to this style of work. One of them is data security because employees often use their own systems, and there is no way to monitor security procedures.

If a data breach occurs, it could end up costing the company hundreds of thousands of dollars. Also, a data breach would cause the company to lose customer trust.

Monitoring computer systems at an employee’s home is more challenging than taking care of a company system in a centralized location.  

Companies can experience other potential savings, too. A recent study found that 34% of all employees said they would be willing to take up to a 5% pay cut if they would be allowed to work from home.

Another way that companies leveraged these savings in salaries was to offer the ability to work from home instead of a salary raise.

These are only a few ways companies can lower their expenses by allowing workers to work from home. The situation is different for every business, and it is important to weigh the savings against the risks.

10 Important Global Work from Home Statistics

  1. The U.S. Census Bureau found a divide among those who were able to work from home in terms of education, income, and health status.
  2. Of those with incomes of $200,00 or more, 73.1% switched to working from home during the pandemic compared to only 32.1% of those who made between $50,000 and $75,000.
  3. Higher incomes were found among those with higher income, and the U.S. Census Bureau found that those with a bachelor’s degree or higher were three times more likely to work from home during the pandemic than those with a high school diploma or GED.
  4. When asked to rank their health status, those who reported poor health status were less likely to work from home as opposed to those who reported excellent health status.
  5. As of 2019, nearly 68% of the global workforce reported working from home at least once a month.
  6. Even before the COVID-19 pandemic, working from home increased by 44% since 2016.
  7. In companies that allowed remote working, 55% were founders and C-level executives, and 48% were at the VP level.
  8. A Fundera study found that among remote workers below the executive level, 16% were managers, 14% were office and administrative support, and 13% were from the sales and business development departments.
  9. A pre-COVID-19 study by Owl Labs found that 18% of the workers were from the IT department, 9% were from finance, 14% were in customer service, and 11% were administrative and support staff.
  10. As of 2021, working from home accounts for over 60% of the U.S. economy.

remote working in usa economy


Key Takeaway: These statistics show a trend that should not be surprising considering the effects of the pandemic.

The idea of working from home was already on the rise before the pandemic hit. It is not surprising that there are many differences in the types of jobs that can be done at home and the industries that have the most remote workers.

Overall, these statistics show favorable results in productivity for those who can work from home.

working from home is more popular every year

Companies that allow working from home and flexible work schedules have an advantage in cost savings and an advantage when it comes to attracting and retaining the best employees.

Overview Of Remote Work Statistics

Industry Remote Workers
Percent Of Full-Time Workers Working Remotely 70%
Percent Of Companies Fully Remote 16%
Percent Of Remote Workers Who Are Happy 80%

4.7 million people work remotely at least half the time in the USA.

The idea of working from home has been around for several decades.

Although this possibility was available, only a few industries took advantage of it in the beginning.

But in 2020, the Coronavirus pandemic came along and changed the way people work and the way people think about work.

90% of employees say they were as productive or more working remotely when compared to the office in 2021.

16% of companies around the world are fully remote according to an Owl labs study.

During the Coronavirus, almost 70% of full-time workers are working from home.

Remote employees save an average of 40 minutes daily from commuting.

Let’s explore a few of the findings and trends that this past year has taught us about work.

Does working from home increase productivity?

Many companies had fears that workers would become lazy and unproductive if they were allowed to work from home. This mindset came from the traditional workplace where the office was for work, and home was for relaxing.

They feared that workers would not be able to get into a work mindset at home and that their company would suffer for it. There was a sense that workers needed to be monitored and controlled to get work done.

Studies on productivity among workers found that in most cases, these fears were unfounded. A Stanford study of 16,000 workers found that working from home increased their productivity by 13%. The study involved call center workers.

Workers attributed the increase in productivity to the ability to take more calls per hour due to a quieter work environment. They also took fewer breaks and needed fewer sick days.

Another study reflected similar trends and found that at least 77% who work from home said that they experienced at least some increase in productivity when compared to doing the same work at the office. In the same study, at least 30% said they could get more done in less time.

working from home increases productivity

What percentage of jobs are work from home?

It shouldn't be surprising that only certain jobs can be done from home. Many types of call center jobs and office work can be done more easily from home.

In a study by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, it was found that 37% of workers in financial operations, management, and business were more likely to do some of all of their work from home.

Those in professional occupations were 33% more likely to work from home. These were the occupations with the highest number of workers doing at least some of their work from home.

Do companies save money with remote employees?

Companies that allow all their employees to work from home full-time enjoy several business savings and benefits that can increase their competitive advantage.

These include savings on rent and utilities, cleaning services, and property taxes. Companies also enjoy higher employee retention and increased productivity.

There are some downsides to this style of work. One of them is data security because employees often use their own systems, and there is no way to monitor security procedures.

If a data breach occurs, it could end up costing the company hundreds of thousands of dollars. Also, a data breach would cause the company to lose customer trust.

Monitoring computer systems at an employee’s home is more challenging than taking care of a company system in a centralized location.  

Companies can experience other potential savings, too. A recent study found that 34% of all employees said they would be willing to take up to a 5% pay cut if they would be allowed to work from home.

Another way that companies leveraged these savings in salaries was to offer the ability to work from home instead of a salary raise.

These are only a few ways companies can lower their expenses by allowing workers to work from home. The situation is different for every business, and it is important to weigh the savings against the risks.

10 Important Global Work from Home Statistics

  1. The U.S. Census Bureau found a divide among those who were able to work from home in terms of education, income, and health status.
  2. Of those with incomes of $200,00 or more, 73.1% switched to working from home during the pandemic compared to only 32.1% of those who made between $50,000 and $75,000.
  3. Higher incomes were found among those with higher income, and the U.S. Census Bureau found that those with a bachelor’s degree or higher were three times more likely to work from home during the pandemic than those with a high school diploma or GED.
  4. When asked to rank their health status, those who reported poor health status were less likely to work from home as opposed to those who reported excellent health status.
  5. As of 2019, nearly 68% of the global workforce reported working from home at least once a month.
  6. Even before the COVID-19 pandemic, working from home increased by 44% since 2016.
  7. In companies that allowed remote working, 55% were founders and C-level executives, and 48% were at the VP level.
  8. A Fundera study found that among remote workers below the executive level, 16% were managers, 14% were office and administrative support, and 13% were from the sales and business development departments.
  9. A pre-COVID-19 study by Owl Labs found that 18% of the workers were from the IT department, 9% were from finance, 14% were in customer service, and 11% were administrative and support staff.
  10. As of 2021, working from home accounts for over 60% of the U.S. economy.

remote working in usa economy


Key Takeaway: These statistics show a trend that should not be surprising considering the effects of the pandemic.

The idea of working from home was already on the rise before the pandemic hit. It is not surprising that there are many differences in the types of jobs that can be done at home and the industries that have the most remote workers.

Overall, these statistics show favorable results in productivity for those who can work from home.

working from home is more popular every year

Companies that allow working from home and flexible work schedules have an advantage in cost savings and an advantage when it comes to attracting and retaining the best employees.

Overview Of Remote Work Statistics

Industry Remote Workers
Percent Of Full-Time Workers Working Remotely 70%
Percent Of Companies Fully Remote 16%
Percent Of Remote Workers Who Are Happy 80%

4.7 million people work remotely at least half the time in the USA.

The idea of working from home has been around for several decades.

Although this possibility was available, only a few industries took advantage of it in the beginning.

But in 2020, the Coronavirus pandemic came along and changed the way people work and the way people think about work.

90% of employees say they were as productive or more working remotely when compared to the office in 2021.

16% of companies around the world are fully remote according to an Owl labs study.

During the Coronavirus, almost 70% of full-time workers are working from home.

Remote employees save an average of 40 minutes daily from commuting.

Let’s explore a few of the findings and trends that this past year has taught us about work.

Does working from home increase productivity?

Many companies had fears that workers would become lazy and unproductive if they were allowed to work from home. This mindset came from the traditional workplace where the office was for work, and home was for relaxing.

They feared that workers would not be able to get into a work mindset at home and that their company would suffer for it. There was a sense that workers needed to be monitored and controlled to get work done.

Studies on productivity among workers found that in most cases, these fears were unfounded. A Stanford study of 16,000 workers found that working from home increased their productivity by 13%. The study involved call center workers.

Workers attributed the increase in productivity to the ability to take more calls per hour due to a quieter work environment. They also took fewer breaks and needed fewer sick days.

Another study reflected similar trends and found that at least 77% who work from home said that they experienced at least some increase in productivity when compared to doing the same work at the office. In the same study, at least 30% said they could get more done in less time.

working from home increases productivity

What percentage of jobs are work from home?

It shouldn't be surprising that only certain jobs can be done from home. Many types of call center jobs and office work can be done more easily from home.

In a study by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, it was found that 37% of workers in financial operations, management, and business were more likely to do some of all of their work from home.

Those in professional occupations were 33% more likely to work from home. These were the occupations with the highest number of workers doing at least some of their work from home.

Do companies save money with remote employees?

Companies that allow all their employees to work from home full-time enjoy several business savings and benefits that can increase their competitive advantage.

These include savings on rent and utilities, cleaning services, and property taxes. Companies also enjoy higher employee retention and increased productivity.

There are some downsides to this style of work. One of them is data security because employees often use their own systems, and there is no way to monitor security procedures.

If a data breach occurs, it could end up costing the company hundreds of thousands of dollars. Also, a data breach would cause the company to lose customer trust.

Monitoring computer systems at an employee’s home is more challenging than taking care of a company system in a centralized location.  

Companies can experience other potential savings, too. A recent study found that 34% of all employees said they would be willing to take up to a 5% pay cut if they would be allowed to work from home.

Another way that companies leveraged these savings in salaries was to offer the ability to work from home instead of a salary raise.

These are only a few ways companies can lower their expenses by allowing workers to work from home. The situation is different for every business, and it is important to weigh the savings against the risks.

10 Important Global Work from Home Statistics

  1. The U.S. Census Bureau found a divide among those who were able to work from home in terms of education, income, and health status.
  2. Of those with incomes of $200,00 or more, 73.1% switched to working from home during the pandemic compared to only 32.1% of those who made between $50,000 and $75,000.
  3. Higher incomes were found among those with higher income, and the U.S. Census Bureau found that those with a bachelor’s degree or higher were three times more likely to work from home during the pandemic than those with a high school diploma or GED.
  4. When asked to rank their health status, those who reported poor health status were less likely to work from home as opposed to those who reported excellent health status.
  5. As of 2019, nearly 68% of the global workforce reported working from home at least once a month.
  6. Even before the COVID-19 pandemic, working from home increased by 44% since 2016.
  7. In companies that allowed remote working, 55% were founders and C-level executives, and 48% were at the VP level.
  8. A Fundera study found that among remote workers below the executive level, 16% were managers, 14% were office and administrative support, and 13% were from the sales and business development departments.
  9. A pre-COVID-19 study by Owl Labs found that 18% of the workers were from the IT department, 9% were from finance, 14% were in customer service, and 11% were administrative and support staff.
  10. As of 2021, working from home accounts for over 60% of the U.S. economy.

remote working in usa economy


Key Takeaway: These statistics show a trend that should not be surprising considering the effects of the pandemic.

The idea of working from home was already on the rise before the pandemic hit. It is not surprising that there are many differences in the types of jobs that can be done at home and the industries that have the most remote workers.

Overall, these statistics show favorable results in productivity for those who can work from home.

working from home is more popular every year

Companies that allow working from home and flexible work schedules have an advantage in cost savings and an advantage when it comes to attracting and retaining the best employees.

Overview Of Remote Work Statistics

Industry Remote Workers
Percent Of Full-Time Workers Working Remotely 70%
Percent Of Companies Fully Remote 16%
Percent Of Remote Workers Who Are Happy 80%

4.7 million people work remotely at least half the time in the USA.

The idea of working from home has been around for several decades.

Although this possibility was available, only a few industries took advantage of it in the beginning.

But in 2020, the Coronavirus pandemic came along and changed the way people work and the way people think about work.

90% of employees say they were as productive or more working remotely when compared to the office in 2021.

16% of companies around the world are fully remote according to an Owl labs study.

During the Coronavirus, almost 70% of full-time workers are working from home.

Remote employees save an average of 40 minutes daily from commuting.

Let’s explore a few of the findings and trends that this past year has taught us about work.

Does working from home increase productivity?

Many companies had fears that workers would become lazy and unproductive if they were allowed to work from home. This mindset came from the traditional workplace where the office was for work, and home was for relaxing.

They feared that workers would not be able to get into a work mindset at home and that their company would suffer for it. There was a sense that workers needed to be monitored and controlled to get work done.

Studies on productivity among workers found that in most cases, these fears were unfounded. A Stanford study of 16,000 workers found that working from home increased their productivity by 13%. The study involved call center workers.

Workers attributed the increase in productivity to the ability to take more calls per hour due to a quieter work environment. They also took fewer breaks and needed fewer sick days.

Another study reflected similar trends and found that at least 77% who work from home said that they experienced at least some increase in productivity when compared to doing the same work at the office. In the same study, at least 30% said they could get more done in less time.

working from home increases productivity

What percentage of jobs are work from home?

It shouldn't be surprising that only certain jobs can be done from home. Many types of call center jobs and office work can be done more easily from home.

In a study by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, it was found that 37% of workers in financial operations, management, and business were more likely to do some of all of their work from home.

Those in professional occupations were 33% more likely to work from home. These were the occupations with the highest number of workers doing at least some of their work from home.

Do companies save money with remote employees?

Companies that allow all their employees to work from home full-time enjoy several business savings and benefits that can increase their competitive advantage.

These include savings on rent and utilities, cleaning services, and property taxes. Companies also enjoy higher employee retention and increased productivity.

There are some downsides to this style of work. One of them is data security because employees often use their own systems, and there is no way to monitor security procedures.

If a data breach occurs, it could end up costing the company hundreds of thousands of dollars. Also, a data breach would cause the company to lose customer trust.

Monitoring computer systems at an employee’s home is more challenging than taking care of a company system in a centralized location.  

Companies can experience other potential savings, too. A recent study found that 34% of all employees said they would be willing to take up to a 5% pay cut if they would be allowed to work from home.

Another way that companies leveraged these savings in salaries was to offer the ability to work from home instead of a salary raise.

These are only a few ways companies can lower their expenses by allowing workers to work from home. The situation is different for every business, and it is important to weigh the savings against the risks.

10 Important Global Work from Home Statistics

  1. The U.S. Census Bureau found a divide among those who were able to work from home in terms of education, income, and health status.
  2. Of those with incomes of $200,00 or more, 73.1% switched to working from home during the pandemic compared to only 32.1% of those who made between $50,000 and $75,000.
  3. Higher incomes were found among those with higher income, and the U.S. Census Bureau found that those with a bachelor’s degree or higher were three times more likely to work from home during the pandemic than those with a high school diploma or GED.
  4. When asked to rank their health status, those who reported poor health status were less likely to work from home as opposed to those who reported excellent health status.
  5. As of 2019, nearly 68% of the global workforce reported working from home at least once a month.
  6. Even before the COVID-19 pandemic, working from home increased by 44% since 2016.
  7. In companies that allowed remote working, 55% were founders and C-level executives, and 48% were at the VP level.
  8. A Fundera study found that among remote workers below the executive level, 16% were managers, 14% were office and administrative support, and 13% were from the sales and business development departments.
  9. A pre-COVID-19 study by Owl Labs found that 18% of the workers were from the IT department, 9% were from finance, 14% were in customer service, and 11% were administrative and support staff.
  10. As of 2021, working from home accounts for over 60% of the U.S. economy.

remote working in usa economy


Key Takeaway: These statistics show a trend that should not be surprising considering the effects of the pandemic.

The idea of working from home was already on the rise before the pandemic hit. It is not surprising that there are many differences in the types of jobs that can be done at home and the industries that have the most remote workers.

Overall, these statistics show favorable results in productivity for those who can work from home.

working from home is more popular every year

Companies that allow working from home and flexible work schedules have an advantage in cost savings and an advantage when it comes to attracting and retaining the best employees.

Overview Of Remote Work Statistics

Industry Remote Workers
Percent Of Full-Time Workers Working Remotely 70%
Percent Of Companies Fully Remote 16%
Percent Of Remote Workers Who Are Happy 80%

4.7 million people work remotely at least half the time in the USA.

The idea of working from home has been around for several decades.

Although this possibility was available, only a few industries took advantage of it in the beginning.

But in 2020, the Coronavirus pandemic came along and changed the way people work and the way people think about work.

90% of employees say they were as productive or more working remotely when compared to the office in 2021.

16% of companies around the world are fully remote according to an Owl labs study.

During the Coronavirus, almost 70% of full-time workers are working from home.

Remote employees save an average of 40 minutes daily from commuting.

Let’s explore a few of the findings and trends that this past year has taught us about work.

Does working from home increase productivity?

Many companies had fears that workers would become lazy and unproductive if they were allowed to work from home. This mindset came from the traditional workplace where the office was for work, and home was for relaxing.

They feared that workers would not be able to get into a work mindset at home and that their company would suffer for it. There was a sense that workers needed to be monitored and controlled to get work done.

Studies on productivity among workers found that in most cases, these fears were unfounded. A Stanford study of 16,000 workers found that working from home increased their productivity by 13%. The study involved call center workers.

Workers attributed the increase in productivity to the ability to take more calls per hour due to a quieter work environment. They also took fewer breaks and needed fewer sick days.

Another study reflected similar trends and found that at least 77% who work from home said that they experienced at least some increase in productivity when compared to doing the same work at the office. In the same study, at least 30% said they could get more done in less time.

working from home increases productivity

What percentage of jobs are work from home?

It shouldn't be surprising that only certain jobs can be done from home. Many types of call center jobs and office work can be done more easily from home.

In a study by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, it was found that 37% of workers in financial operations, management, and business were more likely to do some of all of their work from home.

Those in professional occupations were 33% more likely to work from home. These were the occupations with the highest number of workers doing at least some of their work from home.

Do companies save money with remote employees?

Companies that allow all their employees to work from home full-time enjoy several business savings and benefits that can increase their competitive advantage.

These include savings on rent and utilities, cleaning services, and property taxes. Companies also enjoy higher employee retention and increased productivity.

There are some downsides to this style of work. One of them is data security because employees often use their own systems, and there is no way to monitor security procedures.

If a data breach occurs, it could end up costing the company hundreds of thousands of dollars. Also, a data breach would cause the company to lose customer trust.

Monitoring computer systems at an employee’s home is more challenging than taking care of a company system in a centralized location.  

Companies can experience other potential savings, too. A recent study found that 34% of all employees said they would be willing to take up to a 5% pay cut if they would be allowed to work from home.

Another way that companies leveraged these savings in salaries was to offer the ability to work from home instead of a salary raise.

These are only a few ways companies can lower their expenses by allowing workers to work from home. The situation is different for every business, and it is important to weigh the savings against the risks.

10 Important Global Work from Home Statistics

  1. The U.S. Census Bureau found a divide among those who were able to work from home in terms of education, income, and health status.
  2. Of those with incomes of $200,00 or more, 73.1% switched to working from home during the pandemic compared to only 32.1% of those who made between $50,000 and $75,000.
  3. Higher incomes were found among those with higher income, and the U.S. Census Bureau found that those with a bachelor’s degree or higher were three times more likely to work from home during the pandemic than those with a high school diploma or GED.
  4. When asked to rank their health status, those who reported poor health status were less likely to work from home as opposed to those who reported excellent health status.
  5. As of 2019, nearly 68% of the global workforce reported working from home at least once a month.
  6. Even before the COVID-19 pandemic, working from home increased by 44% since 2016.
  7. In companies that allowed remote working, 55% were founders and C-level executives, and 48% were at the VP level.
  8. A Fundera study found that among remote workers below the executive level, 16% were managers, 14% were office and administrative support, and 13% were from the sales and business development departments.
  9. A pre-COVID-19 study by Owl Labs found that 18% of the workers were from the IT department, 9% were from finance, 14% were in customer service, and 11% were administrative and support staff.
  10. As of 2021, working from home accounts for over 60% of the U.S. economy.

remote working in usa economy


Key Takeaway: These statistics show a trend that should not be surprising considering the effects of the pandemic.

The idea of working from home was already on the rise before the pandemic hit. It is not surprising that there are many differences in the types of jobs that can be done at home and the industries that have the most remote workers.

Overall, these statistics show favorable results in productivity for those who can work from home.

working from home is more popular every year

Companies that allow working from home and flexible work schedules have an advantage in cost savings and an advantage when it comes to attracting and retaining the best employees.

Chapter 2

U.S. Remote Work Statistics

There are more remote jobs in the U.S. than ever before. A contributing factor to more people working from home is the Coronavirus pandemic. But is remote work here to stay? Keep reading to find out.

What percentage of U.S. jobs can be done remotely?

We are not going to include those who run their own business from home in this answer. The question is, how many traditional office jobs could be done from home?

In a recent study conducted in April 2020, it was found that 37% of all jobs in the United States could be done from home.

They found significant variations among different industries, but overall, over one-third could do their jobs just as easily from the home office.

Another piece of information found in this study was that jobs that can be done from the home account for 46% of the wages in the United States.

A connection was also found between lower-income economies and the number of jobs that can be done from home on a global basis.

The pandemic forced many companies who had not considered this option previously to have to make rapid shifts to stay in business at all.

One thing that is missing from this data is how many companies that did not previously think that it was possible to work from home found a way to use this option when it suddenly became necessary.

The pandemic created opportunities for innovation when it comes to how people can do their work.

How many remote workers are there in the U.S?

As of 2018, there were nearly 4.3 million remote workers in the United States. This was a 140% increase since 2005.

4.3 million remote workers in the usa

This was still only 3.2% of the workforce in the U.S. and 18% of the global workforce in 2018.

By June of 2020, things had changed significantly. By then, nearly 42% of the workforce was working from home full-time. Some studies say this number is even higher.

Some estimates say that this group of workers now accounts for more than two-thirds of the domestic economy.

The number of people choosing to work from home was already on the rise before the pandemic, but between 2018 and 2020, this number saw a drastic increase from 3.2% to 42%.

How much of the workforce will remain remote in the U.S?

Before the pandemic, working from home had a stigma. Many of these old beliefs were relics of a time when there was a clear separation between work and home life.

The home was viewed as a place of relaxation, and it was thought that those who worked from home did not work as much as they did when they were at the office. Out of necessity, the pandemic almost erased all of the stigmas overnight.

Now, working from home is an accepted norm. A recent survey found that many companies plan to continue to use remote workers, or a hybrid system where the workers come into the office for two days and then work from home the other three.

10 Important U.S. Work from Home Statistics

  1. In 2020, global business experienced a 10% boost in employee retention when they were offered flexible work schedules.
  2. A study found that in 2020, nearly 76% of all workers surveyed said they would be more loyal to their companies if offered the ability to work remotely.
  3. In 2016, nearly 60% U.S. companies said that they offer remote work opportunities, which is a 3-fold increase since 1996.
  4. In a Gallup poll of over 31 million respondents, it was found that 54% of all workers in the U.S. work from home at least 54% of the time, and 20% work from home all the time. This is a large sample population and is considered more reliable than surveys that involved only a few thousand workers.
  5. The United States is only 1% below the global average when it comes to the number of companies that offer the ability to work remotely. This number is 60% in the U.S. and 61% globally.
  6. Remote working is 19% more common among 18-34 year olds than among those 45-60 years olds.
  7. Over 85% of companies in a survey involving 15,000 respondents said that offering greater location flexibility led to increased productivity.
  8. It is estimated that by the year 2030 companies will save about $4.5 trillion by allowing remote working.
  9. A March 2019 survey found that 37% of companies reported a 40% increase in productivity as a result of offering the ability to work remotely. This was compared to only 3% that offered no increase in productivity.
  10. Offering the option to work either remotely or in an office setting boosted employee retention by 10% in 2020.

half of remote workers require choice of working from home

Key Takeaway: These statistics show that the workplace was already in a state of transition before the Coronavirus.

Workers who were allowed flexibility in where and how they worked were more likely to be loyal and stay on the job longer than those who were not given this option.

A majority of the companies said that they experienced increased productivity when employees were allowed to work from home.

Businesses that offered remote options for working experienced many benefits over the traditional office setting.

One thing that the pandemic did for working from home is to destroy many stereotypes and outdated beliefs about the division between work and home life.

What percentage of U.S. jobs can be done remotely?

We are not going to include those who run their own business from home in this answer. The question is, how many traditional office jobs could be done from home?

In a recent study conducted in April 2020, it was found that 37% of all jobs in the United States could be done from home.

They found significant variations among different industries, but overall, over one-third could do their jobs just as easily from the home office.

Another piece of information found in this study was that jobs that can be done from the home account for 46% of the wages in the United States.

A connection was also found between lower-income economies and the number of jobs that can be done from home on a global basis.

The pandemic forced many companies who had not considered this option previously to have to make rapid shifts to stay in business at all.

One thing that is missing from this data is how many companies that did not previously think that it was possible to work from home found a way to use this option when it suddenly became necessary.

The pandemic created opportunities for innovation when it comes to how people can do their work.

How many remote workers are there in the U.S?

As of 2018, there were nearly 4.3 million remote workers in the United States. This was a 140% increase since 2005.

4.3 million remote workers in the usa

This was still only 3.2% of the workforce in the U.S. and 18% of the global workforce in 2018.

By June of 2020, things had changed significantly. By then, nearly 42% of the workforce was working from home full-time. Some studies say this number is even higher.

Some estimates say that this group of workers now accounts for more than two-thirds of the domestic economy.

The number of people choosing to work from home was already on the rise before the pandemic, but between 2018 and 2020, this number saw a drastic increase from 3.2% to 42%.

How much of the workforce will remain remote in the U.S?

Before the pandemic, working from home had a stigma. Many of these old beliefs were relics of a time when there was a clear separation between work and home life.

The home was viewed as a place of relaxation, and it was thought that those who worked from home did not work as much as they did when they were at the office. Out of necessity, the pandemic almost erased all of the stigmas overnight.

Now, working from home is an accepted norm. A recent survey found that many companies plan to continue to use remote workers, or a hybrid system where the workers come into the office for two days and then work from home the other three.

10 Important U.S. Work from Home Statistics

  1. In 2020, global business experienced a 10% boost in employee retention when they were offered flexible work schedules.
  2. A study found that in 2020, nearly 76% of all workers surveyed said they would be more loyal to their companies if offered the ability to work remotely.
  3. In 2016, nearly 60% U.S. companies said that they offer remote work opportunities, which is a 3-fold increase since 1996.
  4. In a Gallup poll of over 31 million respondents, it was found that 54% of all workers in the U.S. work from home at least 54% of the time, and 20% work from home all the time. This is a large sample population and is considered more reliable than surveys that involved only a few thousand workers.
  5. The United States is only 1% below the global average when it comes to the number of companies that offer the ability to work remotely. This number is 60% in the U.S. and 61% globally.
  6. Remote working is 19% more common among 18-34 year olds than among those 45-60 years olds.
  7. Over 85% of companies in a survey involving 15,000 respondents said that offering greater location flexibility led to increased productivity.
  8. It is estimated that by the year 2030 companies will save about $4.5 trillion by allowing remote working.
  9. A March 2019 survey found that 37% of companies reported a 40% increase in productivity as a result of offering the ability to work remotely. This was compared to only 3% that offered no increase in productivity.
  10. Offering the option to work either remotely or in an office setting boosted employee retention by 10% in 2020.

half of remote workers require choice of working from home

Key Takeaway: These statistics show that the workplace was already in a state of transition before the Coronavirus.

Workers who were allowed flexibility in where and how they worked were more likely to be loyal and stay on the job longer than those who were not given this option.

A majority of the companies said that they experienced increased productivity when employees were allowed to work from home.

Businesses that offered remote options for working experienced many benefits over the traditional office setting.

One thing that the pandemic did for working from home is to destroy many stereotypes and outdated beliefs about the division between work and home life.

What percentage of U.S. jobs can be done remotely?

We are not going to include those who run their own business from home in this answer. The question is, how many traditional office jobs could be done from home?

In a recent study conducted in April 2020, it was found that 37% of all jobs in the United States could be done from home.

They found significant variations among different industries, but overall, over one-third could do their jobs just as easily from the home office.

Another piece of information found in this study was that jobs that can be done from the home account for 46% of the wages in the United States.

A connection was also found between lower-income economies and the number of jobs that can be done from home on a global basis.

The pandemic forced many companies who had not considered this option previously to have to make rapid shifts to stay in business at all.

One thing that is missing from this data is how many companies that did not previously think that it was possible to work from home found a way to use this option when it suddenly became necessary.

The pandemic created opportunities for innovation when it comes to how people can do their work.

How many remote workers are there in the U.S?

As of 2018, there were nearly 4.3 million remote workers in the United States. This was a 140% increase since 2005.

4.3 million remote workers in the usa

This was still only 3.2% of the workforce in the U.S. and 18% of the global workforce in 2018.

By June of 2020, things had changed significantly. By then, nearly 42% of the workforce was working from home full-time. Some studies say this number is even higher.

Some estimates say that this group of workers now accounts for more than two-thirds of the domestic economy.

The number of people choosing to work from home was already on the rise before the pandemic, but between 2018 and 2020, this number saw a drastic increase from 3.2% to 42%.

How much of the workforce will remain remote in the U.S?

Before the pandemic, working from home had a stigma. Many of these old beliefs were relics of a time when there was a clear separation between work and home life.

The home was viewed as a place of relaxation, and it was thought that those who worked from home did not work as much as they did when they were at the office. Out of necessity, the pandemic almost erased all of the stigmas overnight.

Now, working from home is an accepted norm. A recent survey found that many companies plan to continue to use remote workers, or a hybrid system where the workers come into the office for two days and then work from home the other three.

10 Important U.S. Work from Home Statistics

  1. In 2020, global business experienced a 10% boost in employee retention when they were offered flexible work schedules.
  2. A study found that in 2020, nearly 76% of all workers surveyed said they would be more loyal to their companies if offered the ability to work remotely.
  3. In 2016, nearly 60% U.S. companies said that they offer remote work opportunities, which is a 3-fold increase since 1996.
  4. In a Gallup poll of over 31 million respondents, it was found that 54% of all workers in the U.S. work from home at least 54% of the time, and 20% work from home all the time. This is a large sample population and is considered more reliable than surveys that involved only a few thousand workers.
  5. The United States is only 1% below the global average when it comes to the number of companies that offer the ability to work remotely. This number is 60% in the U.S. and 61% globally.
  6. Remote working is 19% more common among 18-34 year olds than among those 45-60 years olds.
  7. Over 85% of companies in a survey involving 15,000 respondents said that offering greater location flexibility led to increased productivity.
  8. It is estimated that by the year 2030 companies will save about $4.5 trillion by allowing remote working.
  9. A March 2019 survey found that 37% of companies reported a 40% increase in productivity as a result of offering the ability to work remotely. This was compared to only 3% that offered no increase in productivity.
  10. Offering the option to work either remotely or in an office setting boosted employee retention by 10% in 2020.

half of remote workers require choice of working from home

Key Takeaway: These statistics show that the workplace was already in a state of transition before the Coronavirus.

Workers who were allowed flexibility in where and how they worked were more likely to be loyal and stay on the job longer than those who were not given this option.

A majority of the companies said that they experienced increased productivity when employees were allowed to work from home.

Businesses that offered remote options for working experienced many benefits over the traditional office setting.

One thing that the pandemic did for working from home is to destroy many stereotypes and outdated beliefs about the division between work and home life.

What percentage of U.S. jobs can be done remotely?

We are not going to include those who run their own business from home in this answer. The question is, how many traditional office jobs could be done from home?

In a recent study conducted in April 2020, it was found that 37% of all jobs in the United States could be done from home.

They found significant variations among different industries, but overall, over one-third could do their jobs just as easily from the home office.

Another piece of information found in this study was that jobs that can be done from the home account for 46% of the wages in the United States.

A connection was also found between lower-income economies and the number of jobs that can be done from home on a global basis.

The pandemic forced many companies who had not considered this option previously to have to make rapid shifts to stay in business at all.

One thing that is missing from this data is how many companies that did not previously think that it was possible to work from home found a way to use this option when it suddenly became necessary.

The pandemic created opportunities for innovation when it comes to how people can do their work.

How many remote workers are there in the U.S?

As of 2018, there were nearly 4.3 million remote workers in the United States. This was a 140% increase since 2005.

4.3 million remote workers in the usa

This was still only 3.2% of the workforce in the U.S. and 18% of the global workforce in 2018.

By June of 2020, things had changed significantly. By then, nearly 42% of the workforce was working from home full-time. Some studies say this number is even higher.

Some estimates say that this group of workers now accounts for more than two-thirds of the domestic economy.

The number of people choosing to work from home was already on the rise before the pandemic, but between 2018 and 2020, this number saw a drastic increase from 3.2% to 42%.

How much of the workforce will remain remote in the U.S?

Before the pandemic, working from home had a stigma. Many of these old beliefs were relics of a time when there was a clear separation between work and home life.

The home was viewed as a place of relaxation, and it was thought that those who worked from home did not work as much as they did when they were at the office. Out of necessity, the pandemic almost erased all of the stigmas overnight.

Now, working from home is an accepted norm. A recent survey found that many companies plan to continue to use remote workers, or a hybrid system where the workers come into the office for two days and then work from home the other three.

10 Important U.S. Work from Home Statistics

  1. In 2020, global business experienced a 10% boost in employee retention when they were offered flexible work schedules.
  2. A study found that in 2020, nearly 76% of all workers surveyed said they would be more loyal to their companies if offered the ability to work remotely.
  3. In 2016, nearly 60% U.S. companies said that they offer remote work opportunities, which is a 3-fold increase since 1996.
  4. In a Gallup poll of over 31 million respondents, it was found that 54% of all workers in the U.S. work from home at least 54% of the time, and 20% work from home all the time. This is a large sample population and is considered more reliable than surveys that involved only a few thousand workers.
  5. The United States is only 1% below the global average when it comes to the number of companies that offer the ability to work remotely. This number is 60% in the U.S. and 61% globally.
  6. Remote working is 19% more common among 18-34 year olds than among those 45-60 years olds.
  7. Over 85% of companies in a survey involving 15,000 respondents said that offering greater location flexibility led to increased productivity.
  8. It is estimated that by the year 2030 companies will save about $4.5 trillion by allowing remote working.
  9. A March 2019 survey found that 37% of companies reported a 40% increase in productivity as a result of offering the ability to work remotely. This was compared to only 3% that offered no increase in productivity.
  10. Offering the option to work either remotely or in an office setting boosted employee retention by 10% in 2020.

half of remote workers require choice of working from home

Key Takeaway: These statistics show that the workplace was already in a state of transition before the Coronavirus.

Workers who were allowed flexibility in where and how they worked were more likely to be loyal and stay on the job longer than those who were not given this option.

A majority of the companies said that they experienced increased productivity when employees were allowed to work from home.

Businesses that offered remote options for working experienced many benefits over the traditional office setting.

One thing that the pandemic did for working from home is to destroy many stereotypes and outdated beliefs about the division between work and home life.

What percentage of U.S. jobs can be done remotely?

We are not going to include those who run their own business from home in this answer. The question is, how many traditional office jobs could be done from home?

In a recent study conducted in April 2020, it was found that 37% of all jobs in the United States could be done from home.

They found significant variations among different industries, but overall, over one-third could do their jobs just as easily from the home office.

Another piece of information found in this study was that jobs that can be done from the home account for 46% of the wages in the United States.

A connection was also found between lower-income economies and the number of jobs that can be done from home on a global basis.

The pandemic forced many companies who had not considered this option previously to have to make rapid shifts to stay in business at all.

One thing that is missing from this data is how many companies that did not previously think that it was possible to work from home found a way to use this option when it suddenly became necessary.

The pandemic created opportunities for innovation when it comes to how people can do their work.

How many remote workers are there in the U.S?

As of 2018, there were nearly 4.3 million remote workers in the United States. This was a 140% increase since 2005.

4.3 million remote workers in the usa

This was still only 3.2% of the workforce in the U.S. and 18% of the global workforce in 2018.

By June of 2020, things had changed significantly. By then, nearly 42% of the workforce was working from home full-time. Some studies say this number is even higher.

Some estimates say that this group of workers now accounts for more than two-thirds of the domestic economy.

The number of people choosing to work from home was already on the rise before the pandemic, but between 2018 and 2020, this number saw a drastic increase from 3.2% to 42%.

How much of the workforce will remain remote in the U.S?

Before the pandemic, working from home had a stigma. Many of these old beliefs were relics of a time when there was a clear separation between work and home life.

The home was viewed as a place of relaxation, and it was thought that those who worked from home did not work as much as they did when they were at the office. Out of necessity, the pandemic almost erased all of the stigmas overnight.

Now, working from home is an accepted norm. A recent survey found that many companies plan to continue to use remote workers, or a hybrid system where the workers come into the office for two days and then work from home the other three.

10 Important U.S. Work from Home Statistics

  1. In 2020, global business experienced a 10% boost in employee retention when they were offered flexible work schedules.
  2. A study found that in 2020, nearly 76% of all workers surveyed said they would be more loyal to their companies if offered the ability to work remotely.
  3. In 2016, nearly 60% U.S. companies said that they offer remote work opportunities, which is a 3-fold increase since 1996.
  4. In a Gallup poll of over 31 million respondents, it was found that 54% of all workers in the U.S. work from home at least 54% of the time, and 20% work from home all the time. This is a large sample population and is considered more reliable than surveys that involved only a few thousand workers.
  5. The United States is only 1% below the global average when it comes to the number of companies that offer the ability to work remotely. This number is 60% in the U.S. and 61% globally.
  6. Remote working is 19% more common among 18-34 year olds than among those 45-60 years olds.
  7. Over 85% of companies in a survey involving 15,000 respondents said that offering greater location flexibility led to increased productivity.
  8. It is estimated that by the year 2030 companies will save about $4.5 trillion by allowing remote working.
  9. A March 2019 survey found that 37% of companies reported a 40% increase in productivity as a result of offering the ability to work remotely. This was compared to only 3% that offered no increase in productivity.
  10. Offering the option to work either remotely or in an office setting boosted employee retention by 10% in 2020.

half of remote workers require choice of working from home

Key Takeaway: These statistics show that the workplace was already in a state of transition before the Coronavirus.

Workers who were allowed flexibility in where and how they worked were more likely to be loyal and stay on the job longer than those who were not given this option.

A majority of the companies said that they experienced increased productivity when employees were allowed to work from home.

Businesses that offered remote options for working experienced many benefits over the traditional office setting.

One thing that the pandemic did for working from home is to destroy many stereotypes and outdated beliefs about the division between work and home life.

What percentage of U.S. jobs can be done remotely?

We are not going to include those who run their own business from home in this answer. The question is, how many traditional office jobs could be done from home?

In a recent study conducted in April 2020, it was found that 37% of all jobs in the United States could be done from home.

They found significant variations among different industries, but overall, over one-third could do their jobs just as easily from the home office.

Another piece of information found in this study was that jobs that can be done from the home account for 46% of the wages in the United States.

A connection was also found between lower-income economies and the number of jobs that can be done from home on a global basis.

The pandemic forced many companies who had not considered this option previously to have to make rapid shifts to stay in business at all.

One thing that is missing from this data is how many companies that did not previously think that it was possible to work from home found a way to use this option when it suddenly became necessary.

The pandemic created opportunities for innovation when it comes to how people can do their work.

How many remote workers are there in the U.S?

As of 2018, there were nearly 4.3 million remote workers in the United States. This was a 140% increase since 2005.

4.3 million remote workers in the usa

This was still only 3.2% of the workforce in the U.S. and 18% of the global workforce in 2018.

By June of 2020, things had changed significantly. By then, nearly 42% of the workforce was working from home full-time. Some studies say this number is even higher.

Some estimates say that this group of workers now accounts for more than two-thirds of the domestic economy.

The number of people choosing to work from home was already on the rise before the pandemic, but between 2018 and 2020, this number saw a drastic increase from 3.2% to 42%.

How much of the workforce will remain remote in the U.S?

Before the pandemic, working from home had a stigma. Many of these old beliefs were relics of a time when there was a clear separation between work and home life.

The home was viewed as a place of relaxation, and it was thought that those who worked from home did not work as much as they did when they were at the office. Out of necessity, the pandemic almost erased all of the stigmas overnight.

Now, working from home is an accepted norm. A recent survey found that many companies plan to continue to use remote workers, or a hybrid system where the workers come into the office for two days and then work from home the other three.

10 Important U.S. Work from Home Statistics

  1. In 2020, global business experienced a 10% boost in employee retention when they were offered flexible work schedules.
  2. A study found that in 2020, nearly 76% of all workers surveyed said they would be more loyal to their companies if offered the ability to work remotely.
  3. In 2016, nearly 60% U.S. companies said that they offer remote work opportunities, which is a 3-fold increase since 1996.
  4. In a Gallup poll of over 31 million respondents, it was found that 54% of all workers in the U.S. work from home at least 54% of the time, and 20% work from home all the time. This is a large sample population and is considered more reliable than surveys that involved only a few thousand workers.
  5. The United States is only 1% below the global average when it comes to the number of companies that offer the ability to work remotely. This number is 60% in the U.S. and 61% globally.
  6. Remote working is 19% more common among 18-34 year olds than among those 45-60 years olds.
  7. Over 85% of companies in a survey involving 15,000 respondents said that offering greater location flexibility led to increased productivity.
  8. It is estimated that by the year 2030 companies will save about $4.5 trillion by allowing remote working.
  9. A March 2019 survey found that 37% of companies reported a 40% increase in productivity as a result of offering the ability to work remotely. This was compared to only 3% that offered no increase in productivity.
  10. Offering the option to work either remotely or in an office setting boosted employee retention by 10% in 2020.

half of remote workers require choice of working from home

Key Takeaway: These statistics show that the workplace was already in a state of transition before the Coronavirus.

Workers who were allowed flexibility in where and how they worked were more likely to be loyal and stay on the job longer than those who were not given this option.

A majority of the companies said that they experienced increased productivity when employees were allowed to work from home.

Businesses that offered remote options for working experienced many benefits over the traditional office setting.

One thing that the pandemic did for working from home is to destroy many stereotypes and outdated beliefs about the division between work and home life.

What percentage of U.S. jobs can be done remotely?

We are not going to include those who run their own business from home in this answer. The question is, how many traditional office jobs could be done from home?

In a recent study conducted in April 2020, it was found that 37% of all jobs in the United States could be done from home.

They found significant variations among different industries, but overall, over one-third could do their jobs just as easily from the home office.

Another piece of information found in this study was that jobs that can be done from the home account for 46% of the wages in the United States.

A connection was also found between lower-income economies and the number of jobs that can be done from home on a global basis.

The pandemic forced many companies who had not considered this option previously to have to make rapid shifts to stay in business at all.

One thing that is missing from this data is how many companies that did not previously think that it was possible to work from home found a way to use this option when it suddenly became necessary.

The pandemic created opportunities for innovation when it comes to how people can do their work.

How many remote workers are there in the U.S?

As of 2018, there were nearly 4.3 million remote workers in the United States. This was a 140% increase since 2005.

4.3 million remote workers in the usa

This was still only 3.2% of the workforce in the U.S. and 18% of the global workforce in 2018.

By June of 2020, things had changed significantly. By then, nearly 42% of the workforce was working from home full-time. Some studies say this number is even higher.

Some estimates say that this group of workers now accounts for more than two-thirds of the domestic economy.

The number of people choosing to work from home was already on the rise before the pandemic, but between 2018 and 2020, this number saw a drastic increase from 3.2% to 42%.

How much of the workforce will remain remote in the U.S?

Before the pandemic, working from home had a stigma. Many of these old beliefs were relics of a time when there was a clear separation between work and home life.

The home was viewed as a place of relaxation, and it was thought that those who worked from home did not work as much as they did when they were at the office. Out of necessity, the pandemic almost erased all of the stigmas overnight.

Now, working from home is an accepted norm. A recent survey found that many companies plan to continue to use remote workers, or a hybrid system where the workers come into the office for two days and then work from home the other three.

10 Important U.S. Work from Home Statistics

  1. In 2020, global business experienced a 10% boost in employee retention when they were offered flexible work schedules.
  2. A study found that in 2020, nearly 76% of all workers surveyed said they would be more loyal to their companies if offered the ability to work remotely.
  3. In 2016, nearly 60% U.S. companies said that they offer remote work opportunities, which is a 3-fold increase since 1996.
  4. In a Gallup poll of over 31 million respondents, it was found that 54% of all workers in the U.S. work from home at least 54% of the time, and 20% work from home all the time. This is a large sample population and is considered more reliable than surveys that involved only a few thousand workers.
  5. The United States is only 1% below the global average when it comes to the number of companies that offer the ability to work remotely. This number is 60% in the U.S. and 61% globally.
  6. Remote working is 19% more common among 18-34 year olds than among those 45-60 years olds.
  7. Over 85% of companies in a survey involving 15,000 respondents said that offering greater location flexibility led to increased productivity.
  8. It is estimated that by the year 2030 companies will save about $4.5 trillion by allowing remote working.
  9. A March 2019 survey found that 37% of companies reported a 40% increase in productivity as a result of offering the ability to work remotely. This was compared to only 3% that offered no increase in productivity.
  10. Offering the option to work either remotely or in an office setting boosted employee retention by 10% in 2020.

half of remote workers require choice of working from home

Key Takeaway: These statistics show that the workplace was already in a state of transition before the Coronavirus.

Workers who were allowed flexibility in where and how they worked were more likely to be loyal and stay on the job longer than those who were not given this option.

A majority of the companies said that they experienced increased productivity when employees were allowed to work from home.

Businesses that offered remote options for working experienced many benefits over the traditional office setting.

One thing that the pandemic did for working from home is to destroy many stereotypes and outdated beliefs about the division between work and home life.

What percentage of U.S. jobs can be done remotely?

We are not going to include those who run their own business from home in this answer. The question is, how many traditional office jobs could be done from home?

In a recent study conducted in April 2020, it was found that 37% of all jobs in the United States could be done from home.

They found significant variations among different industries, but overall, over one-third could do their jobs just as easily from the home office.

Another piece of information found in this study was that jobs that can be done from the home account for 46% of the wages in the United States.

A connection was also found between lower-income economies and the number of jobs that can be done from home on a global basis.

The pandemic forced many companies who had not considered this option previously to have to make rapid shifts to stay in business at all.

One thing that is missing from this data is how many companies that did not previously think that it was possible to work from home found a way to use this option when it suddenly became necessary.

The pandemic created opportunities for innovation when it comes to how people can do their work.

How many remote workers are there in the U.S?

As of 2018, there were nearly 4.3 million remote workers in the United States. This was a 140% increase since 2005.

4.3 million remote workers in the usa

This was still only 3.2% of the workforce in the U.S. and 18% of the global workforce in 2018.

By June of 2020, things had changed significantly. By then, nearly 42% of the workforce was working from home full-time. Some studies say this number is even higher.

Some estimates say that this group of workers now accounts for more than two-thirds of the domestic economy.

The number of people choosing to work from home was already on the rise before the pandemic, but between 2018 and 2020, this number saw a drastic increase from 3.2% to 42%.

How much of the workforce will remain remote in the U.S?

Before the pandemic, working from home had a stigma. Many of these old beliefs were relics of a time when there was a clear separation between work and home life.

The home was viewed as a place of relaxation, and it was thought that those who worked from home did not work as much as they did when they were at the office. Out of necessity, the pandemic almost erased all of the stigmas overnight.

Now, working from home is an accepted norm. A recent survey found that many companies plan to continue to use remote workers, or a hybrid system where the workers come into the office for two days and then work from home the other three.

10 Important U.S. Work from Home Statistics

  1. In 2020, global business experienced a 10% boost in employee retention when they were offered flexible work schedules.
  2. A study found that in 2020, nearly 76% of all workers surveyed said they would be more loyal to their companies if offered the ability to work remotely.
  3. In 2016, nearly 60% U.S. companies said that they offer remote work opportunities, which is a 3-fold increase since 1996.
  4. In a Gallup poll of over 31 million respondents, it was found that 54% of all workers in the U.S. work from home at least 54% of the time, and 20% work from home all the time. This is a large sample population and is considered more reliable than surveys that involved only a few thousand workers.
  5. The United States is only 1% below the global average when it comes to the number of companies that offer the ability to work remotely. This number is 60% in the U.S. and 61% globally.
  6. Remote working is 19% more common among 18-34 year olds than among those 45-60 years olds.
  7. Over 85% of companies in a survey involving 15,000 respondents said that offering greater location flexibility led to increased productivity.
  8. It is estimated that by the year 2030 companies will save about $4.5 trillion by allowing remote working.
  9. A March 2019 survey found that 37% of companies reported a 40% increase in productivity as a result of offering the ability to work remotely. This was compared to only 3% that offered no increase in productivity.
  10. Offering the option to work either remotely or in an office setting boosted employee retention by 10% in 2020.

half of remote workers require choice of working from home

Key Takeaway: These statistics show that the workplace was already in a state of transition before the Coronavirus.

Workers who were allowed flexibility in where and how they worked were more likely to be loyal and stay on the job longer than those who were not given this option.

A majority of the companies said that they experienced increased productivity when employees were allowed to work from home.

Businesses that offered remote options for working experienced many benefits over the traditional office setting.

One thing that the pandemic did for working from home is to destroy many stereotypes and outdated beliefs about the division between work and home life.

What percentage of U.S. jobs can be done remotely?

We are not going to include those who run their own business from home in this answer. The question is, how many traditional office jobs could be done from home?

In a recent study conducted in April 2020, it was found that 37% of all jobs in the United States could be done from home.

They found significant variations among different industries, but overall, over one-third could do their jobs just as easily from the home office.

Another piece of information found in this study was that jobs that can be done from the home account for 46% of the wages in the United States.

A connection was also found between lower-income economies and the number of jobs that can be done from home on a global basis.

The pandemic forced many companies who had not considered this option previously to have to make rapid shifts to stay in business at all.

One thing that is missing from this data is how many companies that did not previously think that it was possible to work from home found a way to use this option when it suddenly became necessary.

The pandemic created opportunities for innovation when it comes to how people can do their work.

How many remote workers are there in the U.S?

As of 2018, there were nearly 4.3 million remote workers in the United States. This was a 140% increase since 2005.

4.3 million remote workers in the usa

This was still only 3.2% of the workforce in the U.S. and 18% of the global workforce in 2018.

By June of 2020, things had changed significantly. By then, nearly 42% of the workforce was working from home full-time. Some studies say this number is even higher.

Some estimates say that this group of workers now accounts for more than two-thirds of the domestic economy.

The number of people choosing to work from home was already on the rise before the pandemic, but between 2018 and 2020, this number saw a drastic increase from 3.2% to 42%.

How much of the workforce will remain remote in the U.S?

Before the pandemic, working from home had a stigma. Many of these old beliefs were relics of a time when there was a clear separation between work and home life.

The home was viewed as a place of relaxation, and it was thought that those who worked from home did not work as much as they did when they were at the office. Out of necessity, the pandemic almost erased all of the stigmas overnight.

Now, working from home is an accepted norm. A recent survey found that many companies plan to continue to use remote workers, or a hybrid system where the workers come into the office for two days and then work from home the other three.

10 Important U.S. Work from Home Statistics

  1. In 2020, global business experienced a 10% boost in employee retention when they were offered flexible work schedules.
  2. A study found that in 2020, nearly 76% of all workers surveyed said they would be more loyal to their companies if offered the ability to work remotely.
  3. In 2016, nearly 60% U.S. companies said that they offer remote work opportunities, which is a 3-fold increase since 1996.
  4. In a Gallup poll of over 31 million respondents, it was found that 54% of all workers in the U.S. work from home at least 54% of the time, and 20% work from home all the time. This is a large sample population and is considered more reliable than surveys that involved only a few thousand workers.
  5. The United States is only 1% below the global average when it comes to the number of companies that offer the ability to work remotely. This number is 60% in the U.S. and 61% globally.
  6. Remote working is 19% more common among 18-34 year olds than among those 45-60 years olds.
  7. Over 85% of companies in a survey involving 15,000 respondents said that offering greater location flexibility led to increased productivity.
  8. It is estimated that by the year 2030 companies will save about $4.5 trillion by allowing remote working.
  9. A March 2019 survey found that 37% of companies reported a 40% increase in productivity as a result of offering the ability to work remotely. This was compared to only 3% that offered no increase in productivity.
  10. Offering the option to work either remotely or in an office setting boosted employee retention by 10% in 2020.

half of remote workers require choice of working from home

Key Takeaway: These statistics show that the workplace was already in a state of transition before the Coronavirus.

Workers who were allowed flexibility in where and how they worked were more likely to be loyal and stay on the job longer than those who were not given this option.

A majority of the companies said that they experienced increased productivity when employees were allowed to work from home.

Businesses that offered remote options for working experienced many benefits over the traditional office setting.

One thing that the pandemic did for working from home is to destroy many stereotypes and outdated beliefs about the division between work and home life.

What percentage of U.S. jobs can be done remotely?

We are not going to include those who run their own business from home in this answer. The question is, how many traditional office jobs could be done from home?

In a recent study conducted in April 2020, it was found that 37% of all jobs in the United States could be done from home.

They found significant variations among different industries, but overall, over one-third could do their jobs just as easily from the home office.

Another piece of information found in this study was that jobs that can be done from the home account for 46% of the wages in the United States.

A connection was also found between lower-income economies and the number of jobs that can be done from home on a global basis.

The pandemic forced many companies who had not considered this option previously to have to make rapid shifts to stay in business at all.

One thing that is missing from this data is how many companies that did not previously think that it was possible to work from home found a way to use this option when it suddenly became necessary.

The pandemic created opportunities for innovation when it comes to how people can do their work.

How many remote workers are there in the U.S?

As of 2018, there were nearly 4.3 million remote workers in the United States. This was a 140% increase since 2005.

4.3 million remote workers in the usa

This was still only 3.2% of the workforce in the U.S. and 18% of the global workforce in 2018.

By June of 2020, things had changed significantly. By then, nearly 42% of the workforce was working from home full-time. Some studies say this number is even higher.

Some estimates say that this group of workers now accounts for more than two-thirds of the domestic economy.

The number of people choosing to work from home was already on the rise before the pandemic, but between 2018 and 2020, this number saw a drastic increase from 3.2% to 42%.

How much of the workforce will remain remote in the U.S?

Before the pandemic, working from home had a stigma. Many of these old beliefs were relics of a time when there was a clear separation between work and home life.

The home was viewed as a place of relaxation, and it was thought that those who worked from home did not work as much as they did when they were at the office. Out of necessity, the pandemic almost erased all of the stigmas overnight.

Now, working from home is an accepted norm. A recent survey found that many companies plan to continue to use remote workers, or a hybrid system where the workers come into the office for two days and then work from home the other three.

10 Important U.S. Work from Home Statistics

  1. In 2020, global business experienced a 10% boost in employee retention when they were offered flexible work schedules.
  2. A study found that in 2020, nearly 76% of all workers surveyed said they would be more loyal to their companies if offered the ability to work remotely.
  3. In 2016, nearly 60% U.S. companies said that they offer remote work opportunities, which is a 3-fold increase since 1996.
  4. In a Gallup poll of over 31 million respondents, it was found that 54% of all workers in the U.S. work from home at least 54% of the time, and 20% work from home all the time. This is a large sample population and is considered more reliable than surveys that involved only a few thousand workers.
  5. The United States is only 1% below the global average when it comes to the number of companies that offer the ability to work remotely. This number is 60% in the U.S. and 61% globally.
  6. Remote working is 19% more common among 18-34 year olds than among those 45-60 years olds.
  7. Over 85% of companies in a survey involving 15,000 respondents said that offering greater location flexibility led to increased productivity.
  8. It is estimated that by the year 2030 companies will save about $4.5 trillion by allowing remote working.
  9. A March 2019 survey found that 37% of companies reported a 40% increase in productivity as a result of offering the ability to work remotely. This was compared to only 3% that offered no increase in productivity.
  10. Offering the option to work either remotely or in an office setting boosted employee retention by 10% in 2020.

half of remote workers require choice of working from home

Key Takeaway: These statistics show that the workplace was already in a state of transition before the Coronavirus.

Workers who were allowed flexibility in where and how they worked were more likely to be loyal and stay on the job longer than those who were not given this option.

A majority of the companies said that they experienced increased productivity when employees were allowed to work from home.

Businesses that offered remote options for working experienced many benefits over the traditional office setting.

One thing that the pandemic did for working from home is to destroy many stereotypes and outdated beliefs about the division between work and home life.

What percentage of U.S. jobs can be done remotely?

We are not going to include those who run their own business from home in this answer. The question is, how many traditional office jobs could be done from home?

In a recent study conducted in April 2020, it was found that 37% of all jobs in the United States could be done from home.

They found significant variations among different industries, but overall, over one-third could do their jobs just as easily from the home office.

Another piece of information found in this study was that jobs that can be done from the home account for 46% of the wages in the United States.

A connection was also found between lower-income economies and the number of jobs that can be done from home on a global basis.

The pandemic forced many companies who had not considered this option previously to have to make rapid shifts to stay in business at all.

One thing that is missing from this data is how many companies that did not previously think that it was possible to work from home found a way to use this option when it suddenly became necessary.

The pandemic created opportunities for innovation when it comes to how people can do their work.

How many remote workers are there in the U.S?

As of 2018, there were nearly 4.3 million remote workers in the United States. This was a 140% increase since 2005.

4.3 million remote workers in the usa

This was still only 3.2% of the workforce in the U.S. and 18% of the global workforce in 2018.

By June of 2020, things had changed significantly. By then, nearly 42% of the workforce was working from home full-time. Some studies say this number is even higher.

Some estimates say that this group of workers now accounts for more than two-thirds of the domestic economy.

The number of people choosing to work from home was already on the rise before the pandemic, but between 2018 and 2020, this number saw a drastic increase from 3.2% to 42%.

How much of the workforce will remain remote in the U.S?

Before the pandemic, working from home had a stigma. Many of these old beliefs were relics of a time when there was a clear separation between work and home life.

The home was viewed as a place of relaxation, and it was thought that those who worked from home did not work as much as they did when they were at the office. Out of necessity, the pandemic almost erased all of the stigmas overnight.

Now, working from home is an accepted norm. A recent survey found that many companies plan to continue to use remote workers, or a hybrid system where the workers come into the office for two days and then work from home the other three.

10 Important U.S. Work from Home Statistics

  1. In 2020, global business experienced a 10% boost in employee retention when they were offered flexible work schedules.
  2. A study found that in 2020, nearly 76% of all workers surveyed said they would be more loyal to their companies if offered the ability to work remotely.
  3. In 2016, nearly 60% U.S. companies said that they offer remote work opportunities, which is a 3-fold increase since 1996.
  4. In a Gallup poll of over 31 million respondents, it was found that 54% of all workers in the U.S. work from home at least 54% of the time, and 20% work from home all the time. This is a large sample population and is considered more reliable than surveys that involved only a few thousand workers.
  5. The United States is only 1% below the global average when it comes to the number of companies that offer the ability to work remotely. This number is 60% in the U.S. and 61% globally.
  6. Remote working is 19% more common among 18-34 year olds than among those 45-60 years olds.
  7. Over 85% of companies in a survey involving 15,000 respondents said that offering greater location flexibility led to increased productivity.
  8. It is estimated that by the year 2030 companies will save about $4.5 trillion by allowing remote working.
  9. A March 2019 survey found that 37% of companies reported a 40% increase in productivity as a result of offering the ability to work remotely. This was compared to only 3% that offered no increase in productivity.
  10. Offering the option to work either remotely or in an office setting boosted employee retention by 10% in 2020.

half of remote workers require choice of working from home

Key Takeaway: These statistics show that the workplace was already in a state of transition before the Coronavirus.

Workers who were allowed flexibility in where and how they worked were more likely to be loyal and stay on the job longer than those who were not given this option.

A majority of the companies said that they experienced increased productivity when employees were allowed to work from home.

Businesses that offered remote options for working experienced many benefits over the traditional office setting.

One thing that the pandemic did for working from home is to destroy many stereotypes and outdated beliefs about the division between work and home life.

What percentage of U.S. jobs can be done remotely?

We are not going to include those who run their own business from home in this answer. The question is, how many traditional office jobs could be done from home?

In a recent study conducted in April 2020, it was found that 37% of all jobs in the United States could be done from home.

They found significant variations among different industries, but overall, over one-third could do their jobs just as easily from the home office.

Another piece of information found in this study was that jobs that can be done from the home account for 46% of the wages in the United States.

A connection was also found between lower-income economies and the number of jobs that can be done from home on a global basis.

The pandemic forced many companies who had not considered this option previously to have to make rapid shifts to stay in business at all.

One thing that is missing from this data is how many companies that did not previously think that it was possible to work from home found a way to use this option when it suddenly became necessary.

The pandemic created opportunities for innovation when it comes to how people can do their work.

How many remote workers are there in the U.S?

As of 2018, there were nearly 4.3 million remote workers in the United States. This was a 140% increase since 2005.

4.3 million remote workers in the usa

This was still only 3.2% of the workforce in the U.S. and 18% of the global workforce in 2018.

By June of 2020, things had changed significantly. By then, nearly 42% of the workforce was working from home full-time. Some studies say this number is even higher.

Some estimates say that this group of workers now accounts for more than two-thirds of the domestic economy.

The number of people choosing to work from home was already on the rise before the pandemic, but between 2018 and 2020, this number saw a drastic increase from 3.2% to 42%.

How much of the workforce will remain remote in the U.S?

Before the pandemic, working from home had a stigma. Many of these old beliefs were relics of a time when there was a clear separation between work and home life.

The home was viewed as a place of relaxation, and it was thought that those who worked from home did not work as much as they did when they were at the office. Out of necessity, the pandemic almost erased all of the stigmas overnight.

Now, working from home is an accepted norm. A recent survey found that many companies plan to continue to use remote workers, or a hybrid system where the workers come into the office for two days and then work from home the other three.

10 Important U.S. Work from Home Statistics

  1. In 2020, global business experienced a 10% boost in employee retention when they were offered flexible work schedules.
  2. A study found that in 2020, nearly 76% of all workers surveyed said they would be more loyal to their companies if offered the ability to work remotely.
  3. In 2016, nearly 60% U.S. companies said that they offer remote work opportunities, which is a 3-fold increase since 1996.
  4. In a Gallup poll of over 31 million respondents, it was found that 54% of all workers in the U.S. work from home at least 54% of the time, and 20% work from home all the time. This is a large sample population and is considered more reliable than surveys that involved only a few thousand workers.
  5. The United States is only 1% below the global average when it comes to the number of companies that offer the ability to work remotely. This number is 60% in the U.S. and 61% globally.
  6. Remote working is 19% more common among 18-34 year olds than among those 45-60 years olds.
  7. Over 85% of companies in a survey involving 15,000 respondents said that offering greater location flexibility led to increased productivity.
  8. It is estimated that by the year 2030 companies will save about $4.5 trillion by allowing remote working.
  9. A March 2019 survey found that 37% of companies reported a 40% increase in productivity as a result of offering the ability to work remotely. This was compared to only 3% that offered no increase in productivity.
  10. Offering the option to work either remotely or in an office setting boosted employee retention by 10% in 2020.

half of remote workers require choice of working from home

Key Takeaway: These statistics show that the workplace was already in a state of transition before the Coronavirus.

Workers who were allowed flexibility in where and how they worked were more likely to be loyal and stay on the job longer than those who were not given this option.

A majority of the companies said that they experienced increased productivity when employees were allowed to work from home.

Businesses that offered remote options for working experienced many benefits over the traditional office setting.

One thing that the pandemic did for working from home is to destroy many stereotypes and outdated beliefs about the division between work and home life.

What percentage of U.S. jobs can be done remotely?

We are not going to include those who run their own business from home in this answer. The question is, how many traditional office jobs could be done from home?

In a recent study conducted in April 2020, it was found that 37% of all jobs in the United States could be done from home.

They found significant variations among different industries, but overall, over one-third could do their jobs just as easily from the home office.

Another piece of information found in this study was that jobs that can be done from the home account for 46% of the wages in the United States.

A connection was also found between lower-income economies and the number of jobs that can be done from home on a global basis.

The pandemic forced many companies who had not considered this option previously to have to make rapid shifts to stay in business at all.

One thing that is missing from this data is how many companies that did not previously think that it was possible to work from home found a way to use this option when it suddenly became necessary.

The pandemic created opportunities for innovation when it comes to how people can do their work.

How many remote workers are there in the U.S?

As of 2018, there were nearly 4.3 million remote workers in the United States. This was a 140% increase since 2005.

4.3 million remote workers in the usa

This was still only 3.2% of the workforce in the U.S. and 18% of the global workforce in 2018.

By June of 2020, things had changed significantly. By then, nearly 42% of the workforce was working from home full-time. Some studies say this number is even higher.

Some estimates say that this group of workers now accounts for more than two-thirds of the domestic economy.

The number of people choosing to work from home was already on the rise before the pandemic, but between 2018 and 2020, this number saw a drastic increase from 3.2% to 42%.

How much of the workforce will remain remote in the U.S?

Before the pandemic, working from home had a stigma. Many of these old beliefs were relics of a time when there was a clear separation between work and home life.

The home was viewed as a place of relaxation, and it was thought that those who worked from home did not work as much as they did when they were at the office. Out of necessity, the pandemic almost erased all of the stigmas overnight.

Now, working from home is an accepted norm. A recent survey found that many companies plan to continue to use remote workers, or a hybrid system where the workers come into the office for two days and then work from home the other three.

10 Important U.S. Work from Home Statistics

  1. In 2020, global business experienced a 10% boost in employee retention when they were offered flexible work schedules.
  2. A study found that in 2020, nearly 76% of all workers surveyed said they would be more loyal to their companies if offered the ability to work remotely.
  3. In 2016, nearly 60% U.S. companies said that they offer remote work opportunities, which is a 3-fold increase since 1996.
  4. In a Gallup poll of over 31 million respondents, it was found that 54% of all workers in the U.S. work from home at least 54% of the time, and 20% work from home all the time. This is a large sample population and is considered more reliable than surveys that involved only a few thousand workers.
  5. The United States is only 1% below the global average when it comes to the number of companies that offer the ability to work remotely. This number is 60% in the U.S. and 61% globally.
  6. Remote working is 19% more common among 18-34 year olds than among those 45-60 years olds.
  7. Over 85% of companies in a survey involving 15,000 respondents said that offering greater location flexibility led to increased productivity.
  8. It is estimated that by the year 2030 companies will save about $4.5 trillion by allowing remote working.
  9. A March 2019 survey found that 37% of companies reported a 40% increase in productivity as a result of offering the ability to work remotely. This was compared to only 3% that offered no increase in productivity.
  10. Offering the option to work either remotely or in an office setting boosted employee retention by 10% in 2020.

half of remote workers require choice of working from home

Key Takeaway: These statistics show that the workplace was already in a state of transition before the Coronavirus.

Workers who were allowed flexibility in where and how they worked were more likely to be loyal and stay on the job longer than those who were not given this option.

A majority of the companies said that they experienced increased productivity when employees were allowed to work from home.

Businesses that offered remote options for working experienced many benefits over the traditional office setting.

One thing that the pandemic did for working from home is to destroy many stereotypes and outdated beliefs about the division between work and home life.

What percentage of U.S. jobs can be done remotely?

We are not going to include those who run their own business from home in this answer. The question is, how many traditional office jobs could be done from home?

In a recent study conducted in April 2020, it was found that 37% of all jobs in the United States could be done from home.

They found significant variations among different industries, but overall, over one-third could do their jobs just as easily from the home office.

Another piece of information found in this study was that jobs that can be done from the home account for 46% of the wages in the United States.

A connection was also found between lower-income economies and the number of jobs that can be done from home on a global basis.

The pandemic forced many companies who had not considered this option previously to have to make rapid shifts to stay in business at all.

One thing that is missing from this data is how many companies that did not previously think that it was possible to work from home found a way to use this option when it suddenly became necessary.

The pandemic created opportunities for innovation when it comes to how people can do their work.

How many remote workers are there in the U.S?

As of 2018, there were nearly 4.3 million remote workers in the United States. This was a 140% increase since 2005.

4.3 million remote workers in the usa

This was still only 3.2% of the workforce in the U.S. and 18% of the global workforce in 2018.

By June of 2020, things had changed significantly. By then, nearly 42% of the workforce was working from home full-time. Some studies say this number is even higher.

Some estimates say that this group of workers now accounts for more than two-thirds of the domestic economy.

The number of people choosing to work from home was already on the rise before the pandemic, but between 2018 and 2020, this number saw a drastic increase from 3.2% to 42%.

How much of the workforce will remain remote in the U.S?

Before the pandemic, working from home had a stigma. Many of these old beliefs were relics of a time when there was a clear separation between work and home life.

The home was viewed as a place of relaxation, and it was thought that those who worked from home did not work as much as they did when they were at the office. Out of necessity, the pandemic almost erased all of the stigmas overnight.

Now, working from home is an accepted norm. A recent survey found that many companies plan to continue to use remote workers, or a hybrid system where the workers come into the office for two days and then work from home the other three.

10 Important U.S. Work from Home Statistics

  1. In 2020, global business experienced a 10% boost in employee retention when they were offered flexible work schedules.
  2. A study found that in 2020, nearly 76% of all workers surveyed said they would be more loyal to their companies if offered the ability to work remotely.
  3. In 2016, nearly 60% U.S. companies said that they offer remote work opportunities, which is a 3-fold increase since 1996.
  4. In a Gallup poll of over 31 million respondents, it was found that 54% of all workers in the U.S. work from home at least 54% of the time, and 20% work from home all the time. This is a large sample population and is considered more reliable than surveys that involved only a few thousand workers.
  5. The United States is only 1% below the global average when it comes to the number of companies that offer the ability to work remotely. This number is 60% in the U.S. and 61% globally.
  6. Remote working is 19% more common among 18-34 year olds than among those 45-60 years olds.
  7. Over 85% of companies in a survey involving 15,000 respondents said that offering greater location flexibility led to increased productivity.
  8. It is estimated that by the year 2030 companies will save about $4.5 trillion by allowing remote working.
  9. A March 2019 survey found that 37% of companies reported a 40% increase in productivity as a result of offering the ability to work remotely. This was compared to only 3% that offered no increase in productivity.
  10. Offering the option to work either remotely or in an office setting boosted employee retention by 10% in 2020.

half of remote workers require choice of working from home

Key Takeaway: These statistics show that the workplace was already in a state of transition before the Coronavirus.

Workers who were allowed flexibility in where and how they worked were more likely to be loyal and stay on the job longer than those who were not given this option.

A majority of the companies said that they experienced increased productivity when employees were allowed to work from home.

Businesses that offered remote options for working experienced many benefits over the traditional office setting.

One thing that the pandemic did for working from home is to destroy many stereotypes and outdated beliefs about the division between work and home life.

What percentage of U.S. jobs can be done remotely?

We are not going to include those who run their own business from home in this answer. The question is, how many traditional office jobs could be done from home?

In a recent study conducted in April 2020, it was found that 37% of all jobs in the United States could be done from home.

They found significant variations among different industries, but overall, over one-third could do their jobs just as easily from the home office.

Another piece of information found in this study was that jobs that can be done from the home account for 46% of the wages in the United States.

A connection was also found between lower-income economies and the number of jobs that can be done from home on a global basis.

The pandemic forced many companies who had not considered this option previously to have to make rapid shifts to stay in business at all.

One thing that is missing from this data is how many companies that did not previously think that it was possible to work from home found a way to use this option when it suddenly became necessary.

The pandemic created opportunities for innovation when it comes to how people can do their work.

How many remote workers are there in the U.S?

As of 2018, there were nearly 4.3 million remote workers in the United States. This was a 140% increase since 2005.

4.3 million remote workers in the usa

This was still only 3.2% of the workforce in the U.S. and 18% of the global workforce in 2018.

By June of 2020, things had changed significantly. By then, nearly 42% of the workforce was working from home full-time. Some studies say this number is even higher.

Some estimates say that this group of workers now accounts for more than two-thirds of the domestic economy.

The number of people choosing to work from home was already on the rise before the pandemic, but between 2018 and 2020, this number saw a drastic increase from 3.2% to 42%.

How much of the workforce will remain remote in the U.S?

Before the pandemic, working from home had a stigma. Many of these old beliefs were relics of a time when there was a clear separation between work and home life.

The home was viewed as a place of relaxation, and it was thought that those who worked from home did not work as much as they did when they were at the office. Out of necessity, the pandemic almost erased all of the stigmas overnight.

Now, working from home is an accepted norm. A recent survey found that many companies plan to continue to use remote workers, or a hybrid system where the workers come into the office for two days and then work from home the other three.

10 Important U.S. Work from Home Statistics

  1. In 2020, global business experienced a 10% boost in employee retention when they were offered flexible work schedules.
  2. A study found that in 2020, nearly 76% of all workers surveyed said they would be more loyal to their companies if offered the ability to work remotely.
  3. In 2016, nearly 60% U.S. companies said that they offer remote work opportunities, which is a 3-fold increase since 1996.
  4. In a Gallup poll of over 31 million respondents, it was found that 54% of all workers in the U.S. work from home at least 54% of the time, and 20% work from home all the time. This is a large sample population and is considered more reliable than surveys that involved only a few thousand workers.
  5. The United States is only 1% below the global average when it comes to the number of companies that offer the ability to work remotely. This number is 60% in the U.S. and 61% globally.
  6. Remote working is 19% more common among 18-34 year olds than among those 45-60 years olds.
  7. Over 85% of companies in a survey involving 15,000 respondents said that offering greater location flexibility led to increased productivity.
  8. It is estimated that by the year 2030 companies will save about $4.5 trillion by allowing remote working.
  9. A March 2019 survey found that 37% of companies reported a 40% increase in productivity as a result of offering the ability to work remotely. This was compared to only 3% that offered no increase in productivity.
  10. Offering the option to work either remotely or in an office setting boosted employee retention by 10% in 2020.

half of remote workers require choice of working from home

Key Takeaway: These statistics show that the workplace was already in a state of transition before the Coronavirus.

Workers who were allowed flexibility in where and how they worked were more likely to be loyal and stay on the job longer than those who were not given this option.

A majority of the companies said that they experienced increased productivity when employees were allowed to work from home.

Businesses that offered remote options for working experienced many benefits over the traditional office setting.

One thing that the pandemic did for working from home is to destroy many stereotypes and outdated beliefs about the division between work and home life.

What percentage of U.S. jobs can be done remotely?

We are not going to include those who run their own business from home in this answer. The question is, how many traditional office jobs could be done from home?

In a recent study conducted in April 2020, it was found that 37% of all jobs in the United States could be done from home.

They found significant variations among different industries, but overall, over one-third could do their jobs just as easily from the home office.

Another piece of information found in this study was that jobs that can be done from the home account for 46% of the wages in the United States.

A connection was also found between lower-income economies and the number of jobs that can be done from home on a global basis.

The pandemic forced many companies who had not considered this option previously to have to make rapid shifts to stay in business at all.

One thing that is missing from this data is how many companies that did not previously think that it was possible to work from home found a way to use this option when it suddenly became necessary.

The pandemic created opportunities for innovation when it comes to how people can do their work.

How many remote workers are there in the U.S?

As of 2018, there were nearly 4.3 million remote workers in the United States. This was a 140% increase since 2005.

4.3 million remote workers in the usa

This was still only 3.2% of the workforce in the U.S. and 18% of the global workforce in 2018.

By June of 2020, things had changed significantly. By then, nearly 42% of the workforce was working from home full-time. Some studies say this number is even higher.

Some estimates say that this group of workers now accounts for more than two-thirds of the domestic economy.

The number of people choosing to work from home was already on the rise before the pandemic, but between 2018 and 2020, this number saw a drastic increase from 3.2% to 42%.

How much of the workforce will remain remote in the U.S?

Before the pandemic, working from home had a stigma. Many of these old beliefs were relics of a time when there was a clear separation between work and home life.

The home was viewed as a place of relaxation, and it was thought that those who worked from home did not work as much as they did when they were at the office. Out of necessity, the pandemic almost erased all of the stigmas overnight.

Now, working from home is an accepted norm. A recent survey found that many companies plan to continue to use remote workers, or a hybrid system where the workers come into the office for two days and then work from home the other three.

10 Important U.S. Work from Home Statistics

  1. In 2020, global business experienced a 10% boost in employee retention when they were offered flexible work schedules.
  2. A study found that in 2020, nearly 76% of all workers surveyed said they would be more loyal to their companies if offered the ability to work remotely.
  3. In 2016, nearly 60% U.S. companies said that they offer remote work opportunities, which is a 3-fold increase since 1996.
  4. In a Gallup poll of over 31 million respondents, it was found that 54% of all workers in the U.S. work from home at least 54% of the time, and 20% work from home all the time. This is a large sample population and is considered more reliable than surveys that involved only a few thousand workers.
  5. The United States is only 1% below the global average when it comes to the number of companies that offer the ability to work remotely. This number is 60% in the U.S. and 61% globally.
  6. Remote working is 19% more common among 18-34 year olds than among those 45-60 years olds.
  7. Over 85% of companies in a survey involving 15,000 respondents said that offering greater location flexibility led to increased productivity.
  8. It is estimated that by the year 2030 companies will save about $4.5 trillion by allowing remote working.
  9. A March 2019 survey found that 37% of companies reported a 40% increase in productivity as a result of offering the ability to work remotely. This was compared to only 3% that offered no increase in productivity.
  10. Offering the option to work either remotely or in an office setting boosted employee retention by 10% in 2020.

half of remote workers require choice of working from home

Key Takeaway: These statistics show that the workplace was already in a state of transition before the Coronavirus.

Workers who were allowed flexibility in where and how they worked were more likely to be loyal and stay on the job longer than those who were not given this option.

A majority of the companies said that they experienced increased productivity when employees were allowed to work from home.

Businesses that offered remote options for working experienced many benefits over the traditional office setting.

One thing that the pandemic did for working from home is to destroy many stereotypes and outdated beliefs about the division between work and home life.

What percentage of U.S. jobs can be done remotely?

We are not going to include those who run their own business from home in this answer. The question is, how many traditional office jobs could be done from home?

In a recent study conducted in April 2020, it was found that 37% of all jobs in the United States could be done from home.

They found significant variations among different industries, but overall, over one-third could do their jobs just as easily from the home office.

Another piece of information found in this study was that jobs that can be done from the home account for 46% of the wages in the United States.

A connection was also found between lower-income economies and the number of jobs that can be done from home on a global basis.

The pandemic forced many companies who had not considered this option previously to have to make rapid shifts to stay in business at all.

One thing that is missing from this data is how many companies that did not previously think that it was possible to work from home found a way to use this option when it suddenly became necessary.

The pandemic created opportunities for innovation when it comes to how people can do their work.

How many remote workers are there in the U.S?

As of 2018, there were nearly 4.3 million remote workers in the United States. This was a 140% increase since 2005.

4.3 million remote workers in the usa

This was still only 3.2% of the workforce in the U.S. and 18% of the global workforce in 2018.

By June of 2020, things had changed significantly. By then, nearly 42% of the workforce was working from home full-time. Some studies say this number is even higher.

Some estimates say that this group of workers now accounts for more than two-thirds of the domestic economy.

The number of people choosing to work from home was already on the rise before the pandemic, but between 2018 and 2020, this number saw a drastic increase from 3.2% to 42%.

How much of the workforce will remain remote in the U.S?

Before the pandemic, working from home had a stigma. Many of these old beliefs were relics of a time when there was a clear separation between work and home life.

The home was viewed as a place of relaxation, and it was thought that those who worked from home did not work as much as they did when they were at the office. Out of necessity, the pandemic almost erased all of the stigmas overnight.

Now, working from home is an accepted norm. A recent survey found that many companies plan to continue to use remote workers, or a hybrid system where the workers come into the office for two days and then work from home the other three.

10 Important U.S. Work from Home Statistics

  1. In 2020, global business experienced a 10% boost in employee retention when they were offered flexible work schedules.
  2. A study found that in 2020, nearly 76% of all workers surveyed said they would be more loyal to their companies if offered the ability to work remotely.
  3. In 2016, nearly 60% U.S. companies said that they offer remote work opportunities, which is a 3-fold increase since 1996.
  4. In a Gallup poll of over 31 million respondents, it was found that 54% of all workers in the U.S. work from home at least 54% of the time, and 20% work from home all the time. This is a large sample population and is considered more reliable than surveys that involved only a few thousand workers.
  5. The United States is only 1% below the global average when it comes to the number of companies that offer the ability to work remotely. This number is 60% in the U.S. and 61% globally.
  6. Remote working is 19% more common among 18-34 year olds than among those 45-60 years olds.
  7. Over 85% of companies in a survey involving 15,000 respondents said that offering greater location flexibility led to increased productivity.
  8. It is estimated that by the year 2030 companies will save about $4.5 trillion by allowing remote working.
  9. A March 2019 survey found that 37% of companies reported a 40% increase in productivity as a result of offering the ability to work remotely. This was compared to only 3% that offered no increase in productivity.
  10. Offering the option to work either remotely or in an office setting boosted employee retention by 10% in 2020.

half of remote workers require choice of working from home

Key Takeaway: These statistics show that the workplace was already in a state of transition before the Coronavirus.

Workers who were allowed flexibility in where and how they worked were more likely to be loyal and stay on the job longer than those who were not given this option.

A majority of the companies said that they experienced increased productivity when employees were allowed to work from home.

Businesses that offered remote options for working experienced many benefits over the traditional office setting.

One thing that the pandemic did for working from home is to destroy many stereotypes and outdated beliefs about the division between work and home life.

What percentage of U.S. jobs can be done remotely?

We are not going to include those who run their own business from home in this answer. The question is, how many traditional office jobs could be done from home?

In a recent study conducted in April 2020, it was found that 37% of all jobs in the United States could be done from home.

They found significant variations among different industries, but overall, over one-third could do their jobs just as easily from the home office.

Another piece of information found in this study was that jobs that can be done from the home account for 46% of the wages in the United States.

A connection was also found between lower-income economies and the number of jobs that can be done from home on a global basis.

The pandemic forced many companies who had not considered this option previously to have to make rapid shifts to stay in business at all.

One thing that is missing from this data is how many companies that did not previously think that it was possible to work from home found a way to use this option when it suddenly became necessary.

The pandemic created opportunities for innovation when it comes to how people can do their work.

How many remote workers are there in the U.S?

As of 2018, there were nearly 4.3 million remote workers in the United States. This was a 140% increase since 2005.

4.3 million remote workers in the usa

This was still only 3.2% of the workforce in the U.S. and 18% of the global workforce in 2018.

By June of 2020, things had changed significantly. By then, nearly 42% of the workforce was working from home full-time. Some studies say this number is even higher.

Some estimates say that this group of workers now accounts for more than two-thirds of the domestic economy.

The number of people choosing to work from home was already on the rise before the pandemic, but between 2018 and 2020, this number saw a drastic increase from 3.2% to 42%.

How much of the workforce will remain remote in the U.S?

Before the pandemic, working from home had a stigma. Many of these old beliefs were relics of a time when there was a clear separation between work and home life.

The home was viewed as a place of relaxation, and it was thought that those who worked from home did not work as much as they did when they were at the office. Out of necessity, the pandemic almost erased all of the stigmas overnight.

Now, working from home is an accepted norm. A recent survey found that many companies plan to continue to use remote workers, or a hybrid system where the workers come into the office for two days and then work from home the other three.

10 Important U.S. Work from Home Statistics

  1. In 2020, global business experienced a 10% boost in employee retention when they were offered flexible work schedules.
  2. A study found that in 2020, nearly 76% of all workers surveyed said they would be more loyal to their companies if offered the ability to work remotely.
  3. In 2016, nearly 60% U.S. companies said that they offer remote work opportunities, which is a 3-fold increase since 1996.
  4. In a Gallup poll of over 31 million respondents, it was found that 54% of all workers in the U.S. work from home at least 54% of the time, and 20% work from home all the time. This is a large sample population and is considered more reliable than surveys that involved only a few thousand workers.
  5. The United States is only 1% below the global average when it comes to the number of companies that offer the ability to work remotely. This number is 60% in the U.S. and 61% globally.
  6. Remote working is 19% more common among 18-34 year olds than among those 45-60 years olds.
  7. Over 85% of companies in a survey involving 15,000 respondents said that offering greater location flexibility led to increased productivity.
  8. It is estimated that by the year 2030 companies will save about $4.5 trillion by allowing remote working.
  9. A March 2019 survey found that 37% of companies reported a 40% increase in productivity as a result of offering the ability to work remotely. This was compared to only 3% that offered no increase in productivity.
  10. Offering the option to work either remotely or in an office setting boosted employee retention by 10% in 2020.

half of remote workers require choice of working from home

Key Takeaway: These statistics show that the workplace was already in a state of transition before the Coronavirus.

Workers who were allowed flexibility in where and how they worked were more likely to be loyal and stay on the job longer than those who were not given this option.

A majority of the companies said that they experienced increased productivity when employees were allowed to work from home.

Businesses that offered remote options for working experienced many benefits over the traditional office setting.

One thing that the pandemic did for working from home is to destroy many stereotypes and outdated beliefs about the division between work and home life.

What percentage of U.S. jobs can be done remotely?

We are not going to include those who run their own business from home in this answer. The question is, how many traditional office jobs could be done from home?

In a recent study conducted in April 2020, it was found that 37% of all jobs in the United States could be done from home.

They found significant variations among different industries, but overall, over one-third could do their jobs just as easily from the home office.

Another piece of information found in this study was that jobs that can be done from the home account for 46% of the wages in the United States.

A connection was also found between lower-income economies and the number of jobs that can be done from home on a global basis.

The pandemic forced many companies who had not considered this option previously to have to make rapid shifts to stay in business at all.

One thing that is missing from this data is how many companies that did not previously think that it was possible to work from home found a way to use this option when it suddenly became necessary.

The pandemic created opportunities for innovation when it comes to how people can do their work.

How many remote workers are there in the U.S?

As of 2018, there were nearly 4.3 million remote workers in the United States. This was a 140% increase since 2005.

4.3 million remote workers in the usa

This was still only 3.2% of the workforce in the U.S. and 18% of the global workforce in 2018.

By June of 2020, things had changed significantly. By then, nearly 42% of the workforce was working from home full-time. Some studies say this number is even higher.

Some estimates say that this group of workers now accounts for more than two-thirds of the domestic economy.

The number of people choosing to work from home was already on the rise before the pandemic, but between 2018 and 2020, this number saw a drastic increase from 3.2% to 42%.

How much of the workforce will remain remote in the U.S?

Before the pandemic, working from home had a stigma. Many of these old beliefs were relics of a time when there was a clear separation between work and home life.

The home was viewed as a place of relaxation, and it was thought that those who worked from home did not work as much as they did when they were at the office. Out of necessity, the pandemic almost erased all of the stigmas overnight.

Now, working from home is an accepted norm. A recent survey found that many companies plan to continue to use remote workers, or a hybrid system where the workers come into the office for two days and then work from home the other three.

10 Important U.S. Work from Home Statistics

  1. In 2020, global business experienced a 10% boost in employee retention when they were offered flexible work schedules.
  2. A study found that in 2020, nearly 76% of all workers surveyed said they would be more loyal to their companies if offered the ability to work remotely.
  3. In 2016, nearly 60% U.S. companies said that they offer remote work opportunities, which is a 3-fold increase since 1996.
  4. In a Gallup poll of over 31 million respondents, it was found that 54% of all workers in the U.S. work from home at least 54% of the time, and 20% work from home all the time. This is a large sample population and is considered more reliable than surveys that involved only a few thousand workers.
  5. The United States is only 1% below the global average when it comes to the number of companies that offer the ability to work remotely. This number is 60% in the U.S. and 61% globally.
  6. Remote working is 19% more common among 18-34 year olds than among those 45-60 years olds.
  7. Over 85% of companies in a survey involving 15,000 respondents said that offering greater location flexibility led to increased productivity.
  8. It is estimated that by the year 2030 companies will save about $4.5 trillion by allowing remote working.
  9. A March 2019 survey found that 37% of companies reported a 40% increase in productivity as a result of offering the ability to work remotely. This was compared to only 3% that offered no increase in productivity.
  10. Offering the option to work either remotely or in an office setting boosted employee retention by 10% in 2020.

half of remote workers require choice of working from home

Key Takeaway: These statistics show that the workplace was already in a state of transition before the Coronavirus.

Workers who were allowed flexibility in where and how they worked were more likely to be loyal and stay on the job longer than those who were not given this option.

A majority of the companies said that they experienced increased productivity when employees were allowed to work from home.

Businesses that offered remote options for working experienced many benefits over the traditional office setting.

One thing that the pandemic did for working from home is to destroy many stereotypes and outdated beliefs about the division between work and home life.

What percentage of U.S. jobs can be done remotely?

We are not going to include those who run their own business from home in this answer. The question is, how many traditional office jobs could be done from home?

In a recent study conducted in April 2020, it was found that 37% of all jobs in the United States could be done from home.

They found significant variations among different industries, but overall, over one-third could do their jobs just as easily from the home office.

Another piece of information found in this study was that jobs that can be done from the home account for 46% of the wages in the United States.

A connection was also found between lower-income economies and the number of jobs that can be done from home on a global basis.

The pandemic forced many companies who had not considered this option previously to have to make rapid shifts to stay in business at all.

One thing that is missing from this data is how many companies that did not previously think that it was possible to work from home found a way to use this option when it suddenly became necessary.

The pandemic created opportunities for innovation when it comes to how people can do their work.

How many remote workers are there in the U.S?

As of 2018, there were nearly 4.3 million remote workers in the United States. This was a 140% increase since 2005.

4.3 million remote workers in the usa

This was still only 3.2% of the workforce in the U.S. and 18% of the global workforce in 2018.

By June of 2020, things had changed significantly. By then, nearly 42% of the workforce was working from home full-time. Some studies say this number is even higher.

Some estimates say that this group of workers now accounts for more than two-thirds of the domestic economy.

The number of people choosing to work from home was already on the rise before the pandemic, but between 2018 and 2020, this number saw a drastic increase from 3.2% to 42%.

How much of the workforce will remain remote in the U.S?

Before the pandemic, working from home had a stigma. Many of these old beliefs were relics of a time when there was a clear separation between work and home life.

The home was viewed as a place of relaxation, and it was thought that those who worked from home did not work as much as they did when they were at the office. Out of necessity, the pandemic almost erased all of the stigmas overnight.

Now, working from home is an accepted norm. A recent survey found that many companies plan to continue to use remote workers, or a hybrid system where the workers come into the office for two days and then work from home the other three.

10 Important U.S. Work from Home Statistics

  1. In 2020, global business experienced a 10% boost in employee retention when they were offered flexible work schedules.
  2. A study found that in 2020, nearly 76% of all workers surveyed said they would be more loyal to their companies if offered the ability to work remotely.
  3. In 2016, nearly 60% U.S. companies said that they offer remote work opportunities, which is a 3-fold increase since 1996.
  4. In a Gallup poll of over 31 million respondents, it was found that 54% of all workers in the U.S. work from home at least 54% of the time, and 20% work from home all the time. This is a large sample population and is considered more reliable than surveys that involved only a few thousand workers.
  5. The United States is only 1% below the global average when it comes to the number of companies that offer the ability to work remotely. This number is 60% in the U.S. and 61% globally.
  6. Remote working is 19% more common among 18-34 year olds than among those 45-60 years olds.
  7. Over 85% of companies in a survey involving 15,000 respondents said that offering greater location flexibility led to increased productivity.
  8. It is estimated that by the year 2030 companies will save about $4.5 trillion by allowing remote working.
  9. A March 2019 survey found that 37% of companies reported a 40% increase in productivity as a result of offering the ability to work remotely. This was compared to only 3% that offered no increase in productivity.
  10. Offering the option to work either remotely or in an office setting boosted employee retention by 10% in 2020.

half of remote workers require choice of working from home

Key Takeaway: These statistics show that the workplace was already in a state of transition before the Coronavirus.

Workers who were allowed flexibility in where and how they worked were more likely to be loyal and stay on the job longer than those who were not given this option.

A majority of the companies said that they experienced increased productivity when employees were allowed to work from home.

Businesses that offered remote options for working experienced many benefits over the traditional office setting.

One thing that the pandemic did for working from home is to destroy many stereotypes and outdated beliefs about the division between work and home life.

What percentage of U.S. jobs can be done remotely?

We are not going to include those who run their own business from home in this answer. The question is, how many traditional office jobs could be done from home?

In a recent study conducted in April 2020, it was found that 37% of all jobs in the United States could be done from home.

They found significant variations among different industries, but overall, over one-third could do their jobs just as easily from the home office.

Another piece of information found in this study was that jobs that can be done from the home account for 46% of the wages in the United States.

A connection was also found between lower-income economies and the number of jobs that can be done from home on a global basis.

The pandemic forced many companies who had not considered this option previously to have to make rapid shifts to stay in business at all.

One thing that is missing from this data is how many companies that did not previously think that it was possible to work from home found a way to use this option when it suddenly became necessary.

The pandemic created opportunities for innovation when it comes to how people can do their work.

How many remote workers are there in the U.S?

As of 2018, there were nearly 4.3 million remote workers in the United States. This was a 140% increase since 2005.

4.3 million remote workers in the usa

This was still only 3.2% of the workforce in the U.S. and 18% of the global workforce in 2018.

By June of 2020, things had changed significantly. By then, nearly 42% of the workforce was working from home full-time. Some studies say this number is even higher.

Some estimates say that this group of workers now accounts for more than two-thirds of the domestic economy.

The number of people choosing to work from home was already on the rise before the pandemic, but between 2018 and 2020, this number saw a drastic increase from 3.2% to 42%.

How much of the workforce will remain remote in the U.S?

Before the pandemic, working from home had a stigma. Many of these old beliefs were relics of a time when there was a clear separation between work and home life.

The home was viewed as a place of relaxation, and it was thought that those who worked from home did not work as much as they did when they were at the office. Out of necessity, the pandemic almost erased all of the stigmas overnight.

Now, working from home is an accepted norm. A recent survey found that many companies plan to continue to use remote workers, or a hybrid system where the workers come into the office for two days and then work from home the other three.

10 Important U.S. Work from Home Statistics

  1. In 2020, global business experienced a 10% boost in employee retention when they were offered flexible work schedules.
  2. A study found that in 2020, nearly 76% of all workers surveyed said they would be more loyal to their companies if offered the ability to work remotely.
  3. In 2016, nearly 60% U.S. companies said that they offer remote work opportunities, which is a 3-fold increase since 1996.
  4. In a Gallup poll of over 31 million respondents, it was found that 54% of all workers in the U.S. work from home at least 54% of the time, and 20% work from home all the time. This is a large sample population and is considered more reliable than surveys that involved only a few thousand workers.
  5. The United States is only 1% below the global average when it comes to the number of companies that offer the ability to work remotely. This number is 60% in the U.S. and 61% globally.
  6. Remote working is 19% more common among 18-34 year olds than among those 45-60 years olds.
  7. Over 85% of companies in a survey involving 15,000 respondents said that offering greater location flexibility led to increased productivity.
  8. It is estimated that by the year 2030 companies will save about $4.5 trillion by allowing remote working.
  9. A March 2019 survey found that 37% of companies reported a 40% increase in productivity as a result of offering the ability to work remotely. This was compared to only 3% that offered no increase in productivity.
  10. Offering the option to work either remotely or in an office setting boosted employee retention by 10% in 2020.

half of remote workers require choice of working from home

Key Takeaway: These statistics show that the workplace was already in a state of transition before the Coronavirus.

Workers who were allowed flexibility in where and how they worked were more likely to be loyal and stay on the job longer than those who were not given this option.

A majority of the companies said that they experienced increased productivity when employees were allowed to work from home.

Businesses that offered remote options for working experienced many benefits over the traditional office setting.

One thing that the pandemic did for working from home is to destroy many stereotypes and outdated beliefs about the division between work and home life.

What percentage of U.S. jobs can be done remotely?

We are not going to include those who run their own business from home in this answer. The question is, how many traditional office jobs could be done from home?

In a recent study conducted in April 2020, it was found that 37% of all jobs in the United States could be done from home.

They found significant variations among different industries, but overall, over one-third could do their jobs just as easily from the home office.

Another piece of information found in this study was that jobs that can be done from the home account for 46% of the wages in the United States.

A connection was also found between lower-income economies and the number of jobs that can be done from home on a global basis.

The pandemic forced many companies who had not considered this option previously to have to make rapid shifts to stay in business at all.

One thing that is missing from this data is how many companies that did not previously think that it was possible to work from home found a way to use this option when it suddenly became necessary.

The pandemic created opportunities for innovation when it comes to how people can do their work.

How many remote workers are there in the U.S?

As of 2018, there were nearly 4.3 million remote workers in the United States. This was a 140% increase since 2005.

4.3 million remote workers in the usa

This was still only 3.2% of the workforce in the U.S. and 18% of the global workforce in 2018.

By June of 2020, things had changed significantly. By then, nearly 42% of the workforce was working from home full-time. Some studies say this number is even higher.

Some estimates say that this group of workers now accounts for more than two-thirds of the domestic economy.

The number of people choosing to work from home was already on the rise before the pandemic, but between 2018 and 2020, this number saw a drastic increase from 3.2% to 42%.

How much of the workforce will remain remote in the U.S?

Before the pandemic, working from home had a stigma. Many of these old beliefs were relics of a time when there was a clear separation between work and home life.

The home was viewed as a place of relaxation, and it was thought that those who worked from home did not work as much as they did when they were at the office. Out of necessity, the pandemic almost erased all of the stigmas overnight.

Now, working from home is an accepted norm. A recent survey found that many companies plan to continue to use remote workers, or a hybrid system where the workers come into the office for two days and then work from home the other three.

10 Important U.S. Work from Home Statistics

  1. In 2020, global business experienced a 10% boost in employee retention when they were offered flexible work schedules.
  2. A study found that in 2020, nearly 76% of all workers surveyed said they would be more loyal to their companies if offered the ability to work remotely.
  3. In 2016, nearly 60% U.S. companies said that they offer remote work opportunities, which is a 3-fold increase since 1996.
  4. In a Gallup poll of over 31 million respondents, it was found that 54% of all workers in the U.S. work from home at least 54% of the time, and 20% work from home all the time. This is a large sample population and is considered more reliable than surveys that involved only a few thousand workers.
  5. The United States is only 1% below the global average when it comes to the number of companies that offer the ability to work remotely. This number is 60% in the U.S. and 61% globally.
  6. Remote working is 19% more common among 18-34 year olds than among those 45-60 years olds.
  7. Over 85% of companies in a survey involving 15,000 respondents said that offering greater location flexibility led to increased productivity.
  8. It is estimated that by the year 2030 companies will save about $4.5 trillion by allowing remote working.
  9. A March 2019 survey found that 37% of companies reported a 40% increase in productivity as a result of offering the ability to work remotely. This was compared to only 3% that offered no increase in productivity.
  10. Offering the option to work either remotely or in an office setting boosted employee retention by 10% in 2020.

half of remote workers require choice of working from home

Key Takeaway: These statistics show that the workplace was already in a state of transition before the Coronavirus.

Workers who were allowed flexibility in where and how they worked were more likely to be loyal and stay on the job longer than those who were not given this option.

A majority of the companies said that they experienced increased productivity when employees were allowed to work from home.

Businesses that offered remote options for working experienced many benefits over the traditional office setting.

One thing that the pandemic did for working from home is to destroy many stereotypes and outdated beliefs about the division between work and home life.

What percentage of U.S. jobs can be done remotely?

We are not going to include those who run their own business from home in this answer. The question is, how many traditional office jobs could be done from home?

In a recent study conducted in April 2020, it was found that 37% of all jobs in the United States could be done from home.

They found significant variations among different industries, but overall, over one-third could do their jobs just as easily from the home office.

Another piece of information found in this study was that jobs that can be done from the home account for 46% of the wages in the United States.

A connection was also found between lower-income economies and the number of jobs that can be done from home on a global basis.

The pandemic forced many companies who had not considered this option previously to have to make rapid shifts to stay in business at all.

One thing that is missing from this data is how many companies that did not previously think that it was possible to work from home found a way to use this option when it suddenly became necessary.

The pandemic created opportunities for innovation when it comes to how people can do their work.

How many remote workers are there in the U.S?

As of 2018, there were nearly 4.3 million remote workers in the United States. This was a 140% increase since 2005.

4.3 million remote workers in the usa

This was still only 3.2% of the workforce in the U.S. and 18% of the global workforce in 2018.

By June of 2020, things had changed significantly. By then, nearly 42% of the workforce was working from home full-time. Some studies say this number is even higher.

Some estimates say that this group of workers now accounts for more than two-thirds of the domestic economy.

The number of people choosing to work from home was already on the rise before the pandemic, but between 2018 and 2020, this number saw a drastic increase from 3.2% to 42%.

How much of the workforce will remain remote in the U.S?

Before the pandemic, working from home had a stigma. Many of these old beliefs were relics of a time when there was a clear separation between work and home life.

The home was viewed as a place of relaxation, and it was thought that those who worked from home did not work as much as they did when they were at the office. Out of necessity, the pandemic almost erased all of the stigmas overnight.

Now, working from home is an accepted norm. A recent survey found that many companies plan to continue to use remote workers, or a hybrid system where the workers come into the office for two days and then work from home the other three.

10 Important U.S. Work from Home Statistics

  1. In 2020, global business experienced a 10% boost in employee retention when they were offered flexible work schedules.
  2. A study found that in 2020, nearly 76% of all workers surveyed said they would be more loyal to their companies if offered the ability to work remotely.
  3. In 2016, nearly 60% U.S. companies said that they offer remote work opportunities, which is a 3-fold increase since 1996.
  4. In a Gallup poll of over 31 million respondents, it was found that 54% of all workers in the U.S. work from home at least 54% of the time, and 20% work from home all the time. This is a large sample population and is considered more reliable than surveys that involved only a few thousand workers.
  5. The United States is only 1% below the global average when it comes to the number of companies that offer the ability to work remotely. This number is 60% in the U.S. and 61% globally.
  6. Remote working is 19% more common among 18-34 year olds than among those 45-60 years olds.
  7. Over 85% of companies in a survey involving 15,000 respondents said that offering greater location flexibility led to increased productivity.
  8. It is estimated that by the year 2030 companies will save about $4.5 trillion by allowing remote working.
  9. A March 2019 survey found that 37% of companies reported a 40% increase in productivity as a result of offering the ability to work remotely. This was compared to only 3% that offered no increase in productivity.
  10. Offering the option to work either remotely or in an office setting boosted employee retention by 10% in 2020.

half of remote workers require choice of working from home

Key Takeaway: These statistics show that the workplace was already in a state of transition before the Coronavirus.

Workers who were allowed flexibility in where and how they worked were more likely to be loyal and stay on the job longer than those who were not given this option.

A majority of the companies said that they experienced increased productivity when employees were allowed to work from home.

Businesses that offered remote options for working experienced many benefits over the traditional office setting.

One thing that the pandemic did for working from home is to destroy many stereotypes and outdated beliefs about the division between work and home life.

What percentage of U.S. jobs can be done remotely?

We are not going to include those who run their own business from home in this answer. The question is, how many traditional office jobs could be done from home?

In a recent study conducted in April 2020, it was found that 37% of all jobs in the United States could be done from home.

They found significant variations among different industries, but overall, over one-third could do their jobs just as easily from the home office.

Another piece of information found in this study was that jobs that can be done from the home account for 46% of the wages in the United States.

A connection was also found between lower-income economies and the number of jobs that can be done from home on a global basis.

The pandemic forced many companies who had not considered this option previously to have to make rapid shifts to stay in business at all.

One thing that is missing from this data is how many companies that did not previously think that it was possible to work from home found a way to use this option when it suddenly became necessary.

The pandemic created opportunities for innovation when it comes to how people can do their work.

How many remote workers are there in the U.S?

As of 2018, there were nearly 4.3 million remote workers in the United States. This was a 140% increase since 2005.

4.3 million remote workers in the usa

This was still only 3.2% of the workforce in the U.S. and 18% of the global workforce in 2018.

By June of 2020, things had changed significantly. By then, nearly 42% of the workforce was working from home full-time. Some studies say this number is even higher.

Some estimates say that this group of workers now accounts for more than two-thirds of the domestic economy.

The number of people choosing to work from home was already on the rise before the pandemic, but between 2018 and 2020, this number saw a drastic increase from 3.2% to 42%.

How much of the workforce will remain remote in the U.S?

Before the pandemic, working from home had a stigma. Many of these old beliefs were relics of a time when there was a clear separation between work and home life.

The home was viewed as a place of relaxation, and it was thought that those who worked from home did not work as much as they did when they were at the office. Out of necessity, the pandemic almost erased all of the stigmas overnight.

Now, working from home is an accepted norm. A recent survey found that many companies plan to continue to use remote workers, or a hybrid system where the workers come into the office for two days and then work from home the other three.

10 Important U.S. Work from Home Statistics

  1. In 2020, global business experienced a 10% boost in employee retention when they were offered flexible work schedules.
  2. A study found that in 2020, nearly 76% of all workers surveyed said they would be more loyal to their companies if offered the ability to work remotely.
  3. In 2016, nearly 60% U.S. companies said that they offer remote work opportunities, which is a 3-fold increase since 1996.
  4. In a Gallup poll of over 31 million respondents, it was found that 54% of all workers in the U.S. work from home at least 54% of the time, and 20% work from home all the time. This is a large sample population and is considered more reliable than surveys that involved only a few thousand workers.
  5. The United States is only 1% below the global average when it comes to the number of companies that offer the ability to work remotely. This number is 60% in the U.S. and 61% globally.
  6. Remote working is 19% more common among 18-34 year olds than among those 45-60 years olds.
  7. Over 85% of companies in a survey involving 15,000 respondents said that offering greater location flexibility led to increased productivity.
  8. It is estimated that by the year 2030 companies will save about $4.5 trillion by allowing remote working.
  9. A March 2019 survey found that 37% of companies reported a 40% increase in productivity as a result of offering the ability to work remotely. This was compared to only 3% that offered no increase in productivity.
  10. Offering the option to work either remotely or in an office setting boosted employee retention by 10% in 2020.

half of remote workers require choice of working from home

Key Takeaway: These statistics show that the workplace was already in a state of transition before the Coronavirus.

Workers who were allowed flexibility in where and how they worked were more likely to be loyal and stay on the job longer than those who were not given this option.

A majority of the companies said that they experienced increased productivity when employees were allowed to work from home.

Businesses that offered remote options for working experienced many benefits over the traditional office setting.

One thing that the pandemic did for working from home is to destroy many stereotypes and outdated beliefs about the division between work and home life.

What percentage of U.S. jobs can be done remotely?

We are not going to include those who run their own business from home in this answer. The question is, how many traditional office jobs could be done from home?

In a recent study conducted in April 2020, it was found that 37% of all jobs in the United States could be done from home.

They found significant variations among different industries, but overall, over one-third could do their jobs just as easily from the home office.

Another piece of information found in this study was that jobs that can be done from the home account for 46% of the wages in the United States.

A connection was also found between lower-income economies and the number of jobs that can be done from home on a global basis.

The pandemic forced many companies who had not considered this option previously to have to make rapid shifts to stay in business at all.

One thing that is missing from this data is how many companies that did not previously think that it was possible to work from home found a way to use this option when it suddenly became necessary.

The pandemic created opportunities for innovation when it comes to how people can do their work.

How many remote workers are there in the U.S?

As of 2018, there were nearly 4.3 million remote workers in the United States. This was a 140% increase since 2005.

4.3 million remote workers in the usa

This was still only 3.2% of the workforce in the U.S. and 18% of the global workforce in 2018.

By June of 2020, things had changed significantly. By then, nearly 42% of the workforce was working from home full-time. Some studies say this number is even higher.

Some estimates say that this group of workers now accounts for more than two-thirds of the domestic economy.

The number of people choosing to work from home was already on the rise before the pandemic, but between 2018 and 2020, this number saw a drastic increase from 3.2% to 42%.

How much of the workforce will remain remote in the U.S?

Before the pandemic, working from home had a stigma. Many of these old beliefs were relics of a time when there was a clear separation between work and home life.

The home was viewed as a place of relaxation, and it was thought that those who worked from home did not work as much as they did when they were at the office. Out of necessity, the pandemic almost erased all of the stigmas overnight.

Now, working from home is an accepted norm. A recent survey found that many companies plan to continue to use remote workers, or a hybrid system where the workers come into the office for two days and then work from home the other three.

10 Important U.S. Work from Home Statistics

  1. In 2020, global business experienced a 10% boost in employee retention when they were offered flexible work schedules.
  2. A study found that in 2020, nearly 76% of all workers surveyed said they would be more loyal to their companies if offered the ability to work remotely.
  3. In 2016, nearly 60% U.S. companies said that they offer remote work opportunities, which is a 3-fold increase since 1996.
  4. In a Gallup poll of over 31 million respondents, it was found that 54% of all workers in the U.S. work from home at least 54% of the time, and 20% work from home all the time. This is a large sample population and is considered more reliable than surveys that involved only a few thousand workers.
  5. The United States is only 1% below the global average when it comes to the number of companies that offer the ability to work remotely. This number is 60% in the U.S. and 61% globally.
  6. Remote working is 19% more common among 18-34 year olds than among those 45-60 years olds.
  7. Over 85% of companies in a survey involving 15,000 respondents said that offering greater location flexibility led to increased productivity.
  8. It is estimated that by the year 2030 companies will save about $4.5 trillion by allowing remote working.
  9. A March 2019 survey found that 37% of companies reported a 40% increase in productivity as a result of offering the ability to work remotely. This was compared to only 3% that offered no increase in productivity.
  10. Offering the option to work either remotely or in an office setting boosted employee retention by 10% in 2020.

half of remote workers require choice of working from home

Key Takeaway: These statistics show that the workplace was already in a state of transition before the Coronavirus.

Workers who were allowed flexibility in where and how they worked were more likely to be loyal and stay on the job longer than those who were not given this option.

A majority of the companies said that they experienced increased productivity when employees were allowed to work from home.

Businesses that offered remote options for working experienced many benefits over the traditional office setting.

One thing that the pandemic did for working from home is to destroy many stereotypes and outdated beliefs about the division between work and home life.

Chapter 3

Remote Workplace Trends

There are several remote workplace trends that we think you'll find interesting. Keep reading to find out what those trends are, and what direction the remote workplace is going.

The pandemic caused a rapid shift in the workforce almost overnight, and now, companies and employees have had well over a year to work out the challenges.

The question is whether once the pandemic is declared over if all of the workers will be ordered back to the office or if companies will see a benefit to allowing people to work from home.

This has been the topic of many research studies recently. Let’s see what the data seems to indicate.

What is the future of remote working?

Working from home has its advantages, and it has its challenges. In a Chinese study, workers were found to be more productive when working from, but the study also found that working from home is not a perfect world or a perfect solution.

The study found that working from home caused a greater blurring of the line between work life and home life.

Working from home can be difficult when you have children and dogs barking in the background. Even though more workers found themselves working from home, they were only in certain sectors.

This study Chinese concluded that nearly 60% of all jobs cannot be done from home. This means that only a small portion of the workforce even has the option of continuing to work from home.

One factor that might have influenced these findings is cultural differences in views about work and home life.

The study involved phone bank workers, which could be more difficult with others in the home. The results of this study might not hold for those in other countries or occupations.

The question of whether working from home is here to stay depends on how you define it.

Of the jobs that can be done from home and the workers who are currently filling them, it is expected that many will be allowed to continue to work from home on a part-time basis, but they will be required to go into the office for certain days of the week.

The future of working from home is not black and white, and many companies are offering a hybrid of office work and working from home.

Is remote work going away, and will it continue in 2022?

In the short term, at least into 2022, many companies are extending working from home. Google is one of them. Other companies, including Lyft and Asana, are also pushing their return to the office dates back to 2022.

Other companies said they plan to transition to a hybrid arrangement where workers will spend part of the time in the office and part of the time working from home.

There were no hard statistics available as to how many companies plan to push back the date of office return, allow part-time work from home, or forgo the office altogether and form a permanent remote workforce.

It is expected that many companies are waiting to see what COVID trends do in the next several months before making the decision.

It is also expected that many companies will take the lead of larger companies like Google to make their decisions. For the short term, it looks like the trend of working from home is here to stay, at least until next year.

How much has remote work increased in 2020?

The pandemic caused the biggest work-from-home experiment in history on a global basis.

Before the pandemic hit, approximately 7% of the U.S. workforce worked from home. Regional variations in these numbers exist and can range between 6-11% depending on the part of the country.

One thing to note is that the United States lags other parts of the world when it comes to remote workers.

For instance, 18% of Swedes, 21% of Dutch, and 23% of Danes work from home, which is nearly 2-3 times those in the United States.

The pandemic has shifted the number of workers in the U.S. who are working from home, but this number is still comparatively small from a global perspective.

What companies are staying remote?

Not all companies want to call workers back into the office. Some have announced that they are closing their office doors permanently and will only be using remote workers from now on.

It is not known how many companies will ultimately choose this option, but over 100 companies in the United States have announced that they will only hire remote workers from now on. Some of these companies include:

  • GoDaddy
  • Shopify
  • Spotify
  • Upwork
  • InVision
  • Stripe
  • Twitch
  • Oyster
  • GitHub


These are some of the biggest and well-known companies that have made this announcement. There are probably many small to medium size organizations that will make this switch, too.

The bottom line is that if you want to work for a large company and you want to work from home, you have many more opportunities now than in the past. This number continues to grow as many companies see the advantages and cost savings of this option.

10 Important Remote Workplace Trends

  1. The option to work from home makes a business more attractive to employees, which might help business attract top talent.
  2. In a 2020 study, half the workers said they would not return to a job that did not offer the ability to work from home.
  3. As of 2020, people were using video conferencing 50% more than before COVID-19.
  4. In 2020, 79% of the people thought that video conferencing was as productive or more productive than in-person meetings.
  5. Remote workers worked an average of 26 more hours per month during the pandemic, which amounts to one extra day per week.
  6. In a 2020 survey, 43% of the respondents were afraid that working from home would affect their career progression in the future.
  7. In terms of working environment, 67% said they worked from their home office, and 49% said they worked from their dining room table or their sofa. Approximately 42% had worked from their bedroom, and 15% had worked from a closet.
  8. Workers do not want to be monitored at home with nearly 32% saying they would be unhappy but stay with the company, and 11% said they would quit if this were implemented.
  9. On average, working remotely saves about 40 minutes a day on the commute.
  10. On average, employees said they were saving about $479 per month, which is almost $6,000 per year, working from home.

Key Takeaway: COVID-19 has opened the eyes of many workers as to what working could be, and they are beginning to see this as an attractive option when considering who to work for and how long they will stay.

As workers demand these options more in the future, companies who are not in favor of working remotely will need to rethink their strategies for attracting and retaining employees.

Both the companies and employees save money with remote work, and improvements in technology make this possible for an increasing number of companies. It is expected that working from home will continue to become an increasingly popular way of life for businesses and workers in the future.

The pandemic caused a rapid shift in the workforce almost overnight, and now, companies and employees have had well over a year to work out the challenges.

The question is whether once the pandemic is declared over if all of the workers will be ordered back to the office or if companies will see a benefit to allowing people to work from home.

This has been the topic of many research studies recently. Let’s see what the data seems to indicate.

What is the future of remote working?

Working from home has its advantages, and it has its challenges. In a Chinese study, workers were found to be more productive when working from, but the study also found that working from home is not a perfect world or a perfect solution.

The study found that working from home caused a greater blurring of the line between work life and home life.

Working from home can be difficult when you have children and dogs barking in the background. Even though more workers found themselves working from home, they were only in certain sectors.

This study Chinese concluded that nearly 60% of all jobs cannot be done from home. This means that only a small portion of the workforce even has the option of continuing to work from home.

One factor that might have influenced these findings is cultural differences in views about work and home life.

The study involved phone bank workers, which could be more difficult with others in the home. The results of this study might not hold for those in other countries or occupations.

The question of whether working from home is here to stay depends on how you define it.

Of the jobs that can be done from home and the workers who are currently filling them, it is expected that many will be allowed to continue to work from home on a part-time basis, but they will be required to go into the office for certain days of the week.

The future of working from home is not black and white, and many companies are offering a hybrid of office work and working from home.

Is remote work going away, and will it continue in 2022?

In the short term, at least into 2022, many companies are extending working from home. Google is one of them. Other companies, including Lyft and Asana, are also pushing their return to the office dates back to 2022.

Other companies said they plan to transition to a hybrid arrangement where workers will spend part of the time in the office and part of the time working from home.

There were no hard statistics available as to how many companies plan to push back the date of office return, allow part-time work from home, or forgo the office altogether and form a permanent remote workforce.

It is expected that many companies are waiting to see what COVID trends do in the next several months before making the decision.

It is also expected that many companies will take the lead of larger companies like Google to make their decisions. For the short term, it looks like the trend of working from home is here to stay, at least until next year.

How much has remote work increased in 2020?

The pandemic caused the biggest work-from-home experiment in history on a global basis.

Before the pandemic hit, approximately 7% of the U.S. workforce worked from home. Regional variations in these numbers exist and can range between 6-11% depending on the part of the country.

One thing to note is that the United States lags other parts of the world when it comes to remote workers.

For instance, 18% of Swedes, 21% of Dutch, and 23% of Danes work from home, which is nearly 2-3 times those in the United States.

The pandemic has shifted the number of workers in the U.S. who are working from home, but this number is still comparatively small from a global perspective.

What companies are staying remote?

Not all companies want to call workers back into the office. Some have announced that they are closing their office doors permanently and will only be using remote workers from now on.

It is not known how many companies will ultimately choose this option, but over 100 companies in the United States have announced that they will only hire remote workers from now on. Some of these companies include:

  • GoDaddy
  • Shopify
  • Spotify
  • Upwork
  • InVision
  • Stripe
  • Twitch
  • Oyster
  • GitHub


These are some of the biggest and well-known companies that have made this announcement. There are probably many small to medium size organizations that will make this switch, too.

The bottom line is that if you want to work for a large company and you want to work from home, you have many more opportunities now than in the past. This number continues to grow as many companies see the advantages and cost savings of this option.

10 Important Remote Workplace Trends

  1. The option to work from home makes a business more attractive to employees, which might help business attract top talent.
  2. In a 2020 study, half the workers said they would not return to a job that did not offer the ability to work from home.
  3. As of 2020, people were using video conferencing 50% more than before COVID-19.
  4. In 2020, 79% of the people thought that video conferencing was as productive or more productive than in-person meetings.
  5. Remote workers worked an average of 26 more hours per month during the pandemic, which amounts to one extra day per week.
  6. In a 2020 survey, 43% of the respondents were afraid that working from home would affect their career progression in the future.
  7. In terms of working environment, 67% said they worked from their home office, and 49% said they worked from their dining room table or their sofa. Approximately 42% had worked from their bedroom, and 15% had worked from a closet.
  8. Workers do not want to be monitored at home with nearly 32% saying they would be unhappy but stay with the company, and 11% said they would quit if this were implemented.
  9. On average, working remotely saves about 40 minutes a day on the commute.
  10. On average, employees said they were saving about $479 per month, which is almost $6,000 per year, working from home.

Key Takeaway: COVID-19 has opened the eyes of many workers as to what working could be, and they are beginning to see this as an attractive option when considering who to work for and how long they will stay.

As workers demand these options more in the future, companies who are not in favor of working remotely will need to rethink their strategies for attracting and retaining employees.

Both the companies and employees save money with remote work, and improvements in technology make this possible for an increasing number of companies. It is expected that working from home will continue to become an increasingly popular way of life for businesses and workers in the future.

The pandemic caused a rapid shift in the workforce almost overnight, and now, companies and employees have had well over a year to work out the challenges.

The question is whether once the pandemic is declared over if all of the workers will be ordered back to the office or if companies will see a benefit to allowing people to work from home.

This has been the topic of many research studies recently. Let’s see what the data seems to indicate.

What is the future of remote working?

Working from home has its advantages, and it has its challenges. In a Chinese study, workers were found to be more productive when working from, but the study also found that working from home is not a perfect world or a perfect solution.

The study found that working from home caused a greater blurring of the line between work life and home life.

Working from home can be difficult when you have children and dogs barking in the background. Even though more workers found themselves working from home, they were only in certain sectors.

This study Chinese concluded that nearly 60% of all jobs cannot be done from home. This means that only a small portion of the workforce even has the option of continuing to work from home.

One factor that might have influenced these findings is cultural differences in views about work and home life.

The study involved phone bank workers, which could be more difficult with others in the home. The results of this study might not hold for those in other countries or occupations.

The question of whether working from home is here to stay depends on how you define it.

Of the jobs that can be done from home and the workers who are currently filling them, it is expected that many will be allowed to continue to work from home on a part-time basis, but they will be required to go into the office for certain days of the week.

The future of working from home is not black and white, and many companies are offering a hybrid of office work and working from home.

Is remote work going away, and will it continue in 2022?

In the short term, at least into 2022, many companies are extending working from home. Google is one of them. Other companies, including Lyft and Asana, are also pushing their return to the office dates back to 2022.

Other companies said they plan to transition to a hybrid arrangement where workers will spend part of the time in the office and part of the time working from home.

There were no hard statistics available as to how many companies plan to push back the date of office return, allow part-time work from home, or forgo the office altogether and form a permanent remote workforce.

It is expected that many companies are waiting to see what COVID trends do in the next several months before making the decision.

It is also expected that many companies will take the lead of larger companies like Google to make their decisions. For the short term, it looks like the trend of working from home is here to stay, at least until next year.

How much has remote work increased in 2020?

The pandemic caused the biggest work-from-home experiment in history on a global basis.

Before the pandemic hit, approximately 7% of the U.S. workforce worked from home. Regional variations in these numbers exist and can range between 6-11% depending on the part of the country.

One thing to note is that the United States lags other parts of the world when it comes to remote workers.

For instance, 18% of Swedes, 21% of Dutch, and 23% of Danes work from home, which is nearly 2-3 times those in the United States.

The pandemic has shifted the number of workers in the U.S. who are working from home, but this number is still comparatively small from a global perspective.

What companies are staying remote?

Not all companies want to call workers back into the office. Some have announced that they are closing their office doors permanently and will only be using remote workers from now on.

It is not known how many companies will ultimately choose this option, but over 100 companies in the United States have announced that they will only hire remote workers from now on. Some of these companies include:

  • GoDaddy
  • Shopify
  • Spotify
  • Upwork
  • InVision
  • Stripe
  • Twitch
  • Oyster
  • GitHub


These are some of the biggest and well-known companies that have made this announcement. There are probably many small to medium size organizations that will make this switch, too.

The bottom line is that if you want to work for a large company and you want to work from home, you have many more opportunities now than in the past. This number continues to grow as many companies see the advantages and cost savings of this option.

10 Important Remote Workplace Trends

  1. The option to work from home makes a business more attractive to employees, which might help business attract top talent.
  2. In a 2020 study, half the workers said they would not return to a job that did not offer the ability to work from home.
  3. As of 2020, people were using video conferencing 50% more than before COVID-19.
  4. In 2020, 79% of the people thought that video conferencing was as productive or more productive than in-person meetings.
  5. Remote workers worked an average of 26 more hours per month during the pandemic, which amounts to one extra day per week.
  6. In a 2020 survey, 43% of the respondents were afraid that working from home would affect their career progression in the future.
  7. In terms of working environment, 67% said they worked from their home office, and 49% said they worked from their dining room table or their sofa. Approximately 42% had worked from their bedroom, and 15% had worked from a closet.
  8. Workers do not want to be monitored at home with nearly 32% saying they would be unhappy but stay with the company, and 11% said they would quit if this were implemented.
  9. On average, working remotely saves about 40 minutes a day on the commute.
  10. On average, employees said they were saving about $479 per month, which is almost $6,000 per year, working from home.

Key Takeaway: COVID-19 has opened the eyes of many workers as to what working could be, and they are beginning to see this as an attractive option when considering who to work for and how long they will stay.

As workers demand these options more in the future, companies who are not in favor of working remotely will need to rethink their strategies for attracting and retaining employees.

Both the companies and employees save money with remote work, and improvements in technology make this possible for an increasing number of companies. It is expected that working from home will continue to become an increasingly popular way of life for businesses and workers in the future.

The pandemic caused a rapid shift in the workforce almost overnight, and now, companies and employees have had well over a year to work out the challenges.

The question is whether once the pandemic is declared over if all of the workers will be ordered back to the office or if companies will see a benefit to allowing people to work from home.

This has been the topic of many research studies recently. Let’s see what the data seems to indicate.

What is the future of remote working?

Working from home has its advantages, and it has its challenges. In a Chinese study, workers were found to be more productive when working from, but the study also found that working from home is not a perfect world or a perfect solution.

The study found that working from home caused a greater blurring of the line between work life and home life.

Working from home can be difficult when you have children and dogs barking in the background. Even though more workers found themselves working from home, they were only in certain sectors.

This study Chinese concluded that nearly 60% of all jobs cannot be done from home. This means that only a small portion of the workforce even has the option of continuing to work from home.

One factor that might have influenced these findings is cultural differences in views about work and home life.

The study involved phone bank workers, which could be more difficult with others in the home. The results of this study might not hold for those in other countries or occupations.

The question of whether working from home is here to stay depends on how you define it.

Of the jobs that can be done from home and the workers who are currently filling them, it is expected that many will be allowed to continue to work from home on a part-time basis, but they will be required to go into the office for certain days of the week.

The future of working from home is not black and white, and many companies are offering a hybrid of office work and working from home.

Is remote work going away, and will it continue in 2022?

In the short term, at least into 2022, many companies are extending working from home. Google is one of them. Other companies, including Lyft and Asana, are also pushing their return to the office dates back to 2022.

Other companies said they plan to transition to a hybrid arrangement where workers will spend part of the time in the office and part of the time working from home.

There were no hard statistics available as to how many companies plan to push back the date of office return, allow part-time work from home, or forgo the office altogether and form a permanent remote workforce.

It is expected that many companies are waiting to see what COVID trends do in the next several months before making the decision.

It is also expected that many companies will take the lead of larger companies like Google to make their decisions. For the short term, it looks like the trend of working from home is here to stay, at least until next year.

How much has remote work increased in 2020?

The pandemic caused the biggest work-from-home experiment in history on a global basis.

Before the pandemic hit, approximately 7% of the U.S. workforce worked from home. Regional variations in these numbers exist and can range between 6-11% depending on the part of the country.

One thing to note is that the United States lags other parts of the world when it comes to remote workers.

For instance, 18% of Swedes, 21% of Dutch, and 23% of Danes work from home, which is nearly 2-3 times those in the United States.

The pandemic has shifted the number of workers in the U.S. who are working from home, but this number is still comparatively small from a global perspective.

What companies are staying remote?

Not all companies want to call workers back into the office. Some have announced that they are closing their office doors permanently and will only be using remote workers from now on.

It is not known how many companies will ultimately choose this option, but over 100 companies in the United States have announced that they will only hire remote workers from now on. Some of these companies include:

  • GoDaddy
  • Shopify
  • Spotify
  • Upwork
  • InVision
  • Stripe
  • Twitch
  • Oyster
  • GitHub


These are some of the biggest and well-known companies that have made this announcement. There are probably many small to medium size organizations that will make this switch, too.

The bottom line is that if you want to work for a large company and you want to work from home, you have many more opportunities now than in the past. This number continues to grow as many companies see the advantages and cost savings of this option.

10 Important Remote Workplace Trends

  1. The option to work from home makes a business more attractive to employees, which might help business attract top talent.
  2. In a 2020 study, half the workers said they would not return to a job that did not offer the ability to work from home.
  3. As of 2020, people were using video conferencing 50% more than before COVID-19.
  4. In 2020, 79% of the people thought that video conferencing was as productive or more productive than in-person meetings.
  5. Remote workers worked an average of 26 more hours per month during the pandemic, which amounts to one extra day per week.
  6. In a 2020 survey, 43% of the respondents were afraid that working from home would affect their career progression in the future.
  7. In terms of working environment, 67% said they worked from their home office, and 49% said they worked from their dining room table or their sofa. Approximately 42% had worked from their bedroom, and 15% had worked from a closet.
  8. Workers do not want to be monitored at home with nearly 32% saying they would be unhappy but stay with the company, and 11% said they would quit if this were implemented.
  9. On average, working remotely saves about 40 minutes a day on the commute.
  10. On average, employees said they were saving about $479 per month, which is almost $6,000 per year, working from home.

Key Takeaway: COVID-19 has opened the eyes of many workers as to what working could be, and they are beginning to see this as an attractive option when considering who to work for and how long they will stay.

As workers demand these options more in the future, companies who are not in favor of working remotely will need to rethink their strategies for attracting and retaining employees.

Both the companies and employees save money with remote work, and improvements in technology make this possible for an increasing number of companies. It is expected that working from home will continue to become an increasingly popular way of life for businesses and workers in the future.

The pandemic caused a rapid shift in the workforce almost overnight, and now, companies and employees have had well over a year to work out the challenges.

The question is whether once the pandemic is declared over if all of the workers will be ordered back to the office or if companies will see a benefit to allowing people to work from home.

This has been the topic of many research studies recently. Let’s see what the data seems to indicate.

What is the future of remote working?

Working from home has its advantages, and it has its challenges. In a Chinese study, workers were found to be more productive when working from, but the study also found that working from home is not a perfect world or a perfect solution.

The study found that working from home caused a greater blurring of the line between work life and home life.

Working from home can be difficult when you have children and dogs barking in the background. Even though more workers found themselves working from home, they were only in certain sectors.

This study Chinese concluded that nearly 60% of all jobs cannot be done from home. This means that only a small portion of the workforce even has the option of continuing to work from home.

One factor that might have influenced these findings is cultural differences in views about work and home life.

The study involved phone bank workers, which could be more difficult with others in the home. The results of this study might not hold for those in other countries or occupations.

The question of whether working from home is here to stay depends on how you define it.

Of the jobs that can be done from home and the workers who are currently filling them, it is expected that many will be allowed to continue to work from home on a part-time basis, but they will be required to go into the office for certain days of the week.

The future of working from home is not black and white, and many companies are offering a hybrid of office work and working from home.

Is remote work going away, and will it continue in 2022?

In the short term, at least into 2022, many companies are extending working from home. Google is one of them. Other companies, including Lyft and Asana, are also pushing their return to the office dates back to 2022.

Other companies said they plan to transition to a hybrid arrangement where workers will spend part of the time in the office and part of the time working from home.

There were no hard statistics available as to how many companies plan to push back the date of office return, allow part-time work from home, or forgo the office altogether and form a permanent remote workforce.

It is expected that many companies are waiting to see what COVID trends do in the next several months before making the decision.

It is also expected that many companies will take the lead of larger companies like Google to make their decisions. For the short term, it looks like the trend of working from home is here to stay, at least until next year.

How much has remote work increased in 2020?

The pandemic caused the biggest work-from-home experiment in history on a global basis.

Before the pandemic hit, approximately 7% of the U.S. workforce worked from home. Regional variations in these numbers exist and can range between 6-11% depending on the part of the country.

One thing to note is that the United States lags other parts of the world when it comes to remote workers.

For instance, 18% of Swedes, 21% of Dutch, and 23% of Danes work from home, which is nearly 2-3 times those in the United States.

The pandemic has shifted the number of workers in the U.S. who are working from home, but this number is still comparatively small from a global perspective.

What companies are staying remote?

Not all companies want to call workers back into the office. Some have announced that they are closing their office doors permanently and will only be using remote workers from now on.

It is not known how many companies will ultimately choose this option, but over 100 companies in the United States have announced that they will only hire remote workers from now on. Some of these companies include:

  • GoDaddy
  • Shopify
  • Spotify
  • Upwork
  • InVision
  • Stripe
  • Twitch
  • Oyster
  • GitHub


These are some of the biggest and well-known companies that have made this announcement. There are probably many small to medium size organizations that will make this switch, too.

The bottom line is that if you want to work for a large company and you want to work from home, you have many more opportunities now than in the past. This number continues to grow as many companies see the advantages and cost savings of this option.

10 Important Remote Workplace Trends

  1. The option to work from home makes a business more attractive to employees, which might help business attract top talent.
  2. In a 2020 study, half the workers said they would not return to a job that did not offer the ability to work from home.
  3. As of 2020, people were using video conferencing 50% more than before COVID-19.
  4. In 2020, 79% of the people thought that video conferencing was as productive or more productive than in-person meetings.
  5. Remote workers worked an average of 26 more hours per month during the pandemic, which amounts to one extra day per week.
  6. In a 2020 survey, 43% of the respondents were afraid that working from home would affect their career progression in the future.
  7. In terms of working environment, 67% said they worked from their home office, and 49% said they worked from their dining room table or their sofa. Approximately 42% had worked from their bedroom, and 15% had worked from a closet.
  8. Workers do not want to be monitored at home with nearly 32% saying they would be unhappy but stay with the company, and 11% said they would quit if this were implemented.
  9. On average, working remotely saves about 40 minutes a day on the commute.
  10. On average, employees said they were saving about $479 per month, which is almost $6,000 per year, working from home.

Key Takeaway: COVID-19 has opened the eyes of many workers as to what working could be, and they are beginning to see this as an attractive option when considering who to work for and how long they will stay.

As workers demand these options more in the future, companies who are not in favor of working remotely will need to rethink their strategies for attracting and retaining employees.

Both the companies and employees save money with remote work, and improvements in technology make this possible for an increasing number of companies. It is expected that working from home will continue to become an increasingly popular way of life for businesses and workers in the future.

The pandemic caused a rapid shift in the workforce almost overnight, and now, companies and employees have had well over a year to work out the challenges.

The question is whether once the pandemic is declared over if all of the workers will be ordered back to the office or if companies will see a benefit to allowing people to work from home.

This has been the topic of many research studies recently. Let’s see what the data seems to indicate.

What is the future of remote working?

Working from home has its advantages, and it has its challenges. In a Chinese study, workers were found to be more productive when working from, but the study also found that working from home is not a perfect world or a perfect solution.

The study found that working from home caused a greater blurring of the line between work life and home life.

Working from home can be difficult when you have children and dogs barking in the background. Even though more workers found themselves working from home, they were only in certain sectors.

This study Chinese concluded that nearly 60% of all jobs cannot be done from home. This means that only a small portion of the workforce even has the option of continuing to work from home.

One factor that might have influenced these findings is cultural differences in views about work and home life.

The study involved phone bank workers, which could be more difficult with others in the home. The results of this study might not hold for those in other countries or occupations.

The question of whether working from home is here to stay depends on how you define it.

Of the jobs that can be done from home and the workers who are currently filling them, it is expected that many will be allowed to continue to work from home on a part-time basis, but they will be required to go into the office for certain days of the week.

The future of working from home is not black and white, and many companies are offering a hybrid of office work and working from home.

Is remote work going away, and will it continue in 2022?

In the short term, at least into 2022, many companies are extending working from home. Google is one of them. Other companies, including Lyft and Asana, are also pushing their return to the office dates back to 2022.

Other companies said they plan to transition to a hybrid arrangement where workers will spend part of the time in the office and part of the time working from home.

There were no hard statistics available as to how many companies plan to push back the date of office return, allow part-time work from home, or forgo the office altogether and form a permanent remote workforce.

It is expected that many companies are waiting to see what COVID trends do in the next several months before making the decision.

It is also expected that many companies will take the lead of larger companies like Google to make their decisions. For the short term, it looks like the trend of working from home is here to stay, at least until next year.

How much has remote work increased in 2020?

The pandemic caused the biggest work-from-home experiment in history on a global basis.

Before the pandemic hit, approximately 7% of the U.S. workforce worked from home. Regional variations in these numbers exist and can range between 6-11% depending on the part of the country.

One thing to note is that the United States lags other parts of the world when it comes to remote workers.

For instance, 18% of Swedes, 21% of Dutch, and 23% of Danes work from home, which is nearly 2-3 times those in the United States.

The pandemic has shifted the number of workers in the U.S. who are working from home, but this number is still comparatively small from a global perspective.

What companies are staying remote?

Not all companies want to call workers back into the office. Some have announced that they are closing their office doors permanently and will only be using remote workers from now on.

It is not known how many companies will ultimately choose this option, but over 100 companies in the United States have announced that they will only hire remote workers from now on. Some of these companies include:

  • GoDaddy
  • Shopify
  • Spotify
  • Upwork
  • InVision
  • Stripe
  • Twitch
  • Oyster
  • GitHub


These are some of the biggest and well-known companies that have made this announcement. There are probably many small to medium size organizations that will make this switch, too.

The bottom line is that if you want to work for a large company and you want to work from home, you have many more opportunities now than in the past. This number continues to grow as many companies see the advantages and cost savings of this option.

10 Important Remote Workplace Trends

  1. The option to work from home makes a business more attractive to employees, which might help business attract top talent.
  2. In a 2020 study, half the workers said they would not return to a job that did not offer the ability to work from home.
  3. As of 2020, people were using video conferencing 50% more than before COVID-19.
  4. In 2020, 79% of the people thought that video conferencing was as productive or more productive than in-person meetings.
  5. Remote workers worked an average of 26 more hours per month during the pandemic, which amounts to one extra day per week.
  6. In a 2020 survey, 43% of the respondents were afraid that working from home would affect their career progression in the future.
  7. In terms of working environment, 67% said they worked from their home office, and 49% said they worked from their dining room table or their sofa. Approximately 42% had worked from their bedroom, and 15% had worked from a closet.
  8. Workers do not want to be monitored at home with nearly 32% saying they would be unhappy but stay with the company, and 11% said they would quit if this were implemented.
  9. On average, working remotely saves about 40 minutes a day on the commute.
  10. On average, employees said they were saving about $479 per month, which is almost $6,000 per year, working from home.

Key Takeaway: COVID-19 has opened the eyes of many workers as to what working could be, and they are beginning to see this as an attractive option when considering who to work for and how long they will stay.

As workers demand these options more in the future, companies who are not in favor of working remotely will need to rethink their strategies for attracting and retaining employees.

Both the companies and employees save money with remote work, and improvements in technology make this possible for an increasing number of companies. It is expected that working from home will continue to become an increasingly popular way of life for businesses and workers in the future.

The pandemic caused a rapid shift in the workforce almost overnight, and now, companies and employees have had well over a year to work out the challenges.

The question is whether once the pandemic is declared over if all of the workers will be ordered back to the office or if companies will see a benefit to allowing people to work from home.

This has been the topic of many research studies recently. Let’s see what the data seems to indicate.

What is the future of remote working?

Working from home has its advantages, and it has its challenges. In a Chinese study, workers were found to be more productive when working from, but the study also found that working from home is not a perfect world or a perfect solution.

The study found that working from home caused a greater blurring of the line between work life and home life.

Working from home can be difficult when you have children and dogs barking in the background. Even though more workers found themselves working from home, they were only in certain sectors.

This study Chinese concluded that nearly 60% of all jobs cannot be done from home. This means that only a small portion of the workforce even has the option of continuing to work from home.

One factor that might have influenced these findings is cultural differences in views about work and home life.

The study involved phone bank workers, which could be more difficult with others in the home. The results of this study might not hold for those in other countries or occupations.

The question of whether working from home is here to stay depends on how you define it.

Of the jobs that can be done from home and the workers who are currently filling them, it is expected that many will be allowed to continue to work from home on a part-time basis, but they will be required to go into the office for certain days of the week.

The future of working from home is not black and white, and many companies are offering a hybrid of office work and working from home.

Is remote work going away, and will it continue in 2022?

In the short term, at least into 2022, many companies are extending working from home. Google is one of them. Other companies, including Lyft and Asana, are also pushing their return to the office dates back to 2022.

Other companies said they plan to transition to a hybrid arrangement where workers will spend part of the time in the office and part of the time working from home.

There were no hard statistics available as to how many companies plan to push back the date of office return, allow part-time work from home, or forgo the office altogether and form a permanent remote workforce.

It is expected that many companies are waiting to see what COVID trends do in the next several months before making the decision.

It is also expected that many companies will take the lead of larger companies like Google to make their decisions. For the short term, it looks like the trend of working from home is here to stay, at least until next year.

How much has remote work increased in 2020?

The pandemic caused the biggest work-from-home experiment in history on a global basis.

Before the pandemic hit, approximately 7% of the U.S. workforce worked from home. Regional variations in these numbers exist and can range between 6-11% depending on the part of the country.

One thing to note is that the United States lags other parts of the world when it comes to remote workers.

For instance, 18% of Swedes, 21% of Dutch, and 23% of Danes work from home, which is nearly 2-3 times those in the United States.

The pandemic has shifted the number of workers in the U.S. who are working from home, but this number is still comparatively small from a global perspective.

What companies are staying remote?

Not all companies want to call workers back into the office. Some have announced that they are closing their office doors permanently and will only be using remote workers from now on.

It is not known how many companies will ultimately choose this option, but over 100 companies in the United States have announced that they will only hire remote workers from now on. Some of these companies include:

  • GoDaddy
  • Shopify
  • Spotify
  • Upwork
  • InVision
  • Stripe
  • Twitch
  • Oyster
  • GitHub


These are some of the biggest and well-known companies that have made this announcement. There are probably many small to medium size organizations that will make this switch, too.

The bottom line is that if you want to work for a large company and you want to work from home, you have many more opportunities now than in the past. This number continues to grow as many companies see the advantages and cost savings of this option.

10 Important Remote Workplace Trends

  1. The option to work from home makes a business more attractive to employees, which might help business attract top talent.
  2. In a 2020 study, half the workers said they would not return to a job that did not offer the ability to work from home.
  3. As of 2020, people were using video conferencing 50% more than before COVID-19.
  4. In 2020, 79% of the people thought that video conferencing was as productive or more productive than in-person meetings.
  5. Remote workers worked an average of 26 more hours per month during the pandemic, which amounts to one extra day per week.
  6. In a 2020 survey, 43% of the respondents were afraid that working from home would affect their career progression in the future.
  7. In terms of working environment, 67% said they worked from their home office, and 49% said they worked from their dining room table or their sofa. Approximately 42% had worked from their bedroom, and 15% had worked from a closet.
  8. Workers do not want to be monitored at home with nearly 32% saying they would be unhappy but stay with the company, and 11% said they would quit if this were implemented.
  9. On average, working remotely saves about 40 minutes a day on the commute.
  10. On average, employees said they were saving about $479 per month, which is almost $6,000 per year, working from home.

Key Takeaway: COVID-19 has opened the eyes of many workers as to what working could be, and they are beginning to see this as an attractive option when considering who to work for and how long they will stay.

As workers demand these options more in the future, companies who are not in favor of working remotely will need to rethink their strategies for attracting and retaining employees.

Both the companies and employees save money with remote work, and improvements in technology make this possible for an increasing number of companies. It is expected that working from home will continue to become an increasingly popular way of life for businesses and workers in the future.

The pandemic caused a rapid shift in the workforce almost overnight, and now, companies and employees have had well over a year to work out the challenges.

The question is whether once the pandemic is declared over if all of the workers will be ordered back to the office or if companies will see a benefit to allowing people to work from home.

This has been the topic of many research studies recently. Let’s see what the data seems to indicate.

What is the future of remote working?

Working from home has its advantages, and it has its challenges. In a Chinese study, workers were found to be more productive when working from, but the study also found that working from home is not a perfect world or a perfect solution.

The study found that working from home caused a greater blurring of the line between work life and home life.

Working from home can be difficult when you have children and dogs barking in the background. Even though more workers found themselves working from home, they were only in certain sectors.

This study Chinese concluded that nearly 60% of all jobs cannot be done from home. This means that only a small portion of the workforce even has the option of continuing to work from home.

One factor that might have influenced these findings is cultural differences in views about work and home life.

The study involved phone bank workers, which could be more difficult with others in the home. The results of this study might not hold for those in other countries or occupations.

The question of whether working from home is here to stay depends on how you define it.

Of the jobs that can be done from home and the workers who are currently filling them, it is expected that many will be allowed to continue to work from home on a part-time basis, but they will be required to go into the office for certain days of the week.

The future of working from home is not black and white, and many companies are offering a hybrid of office work and working from home.

Is remote work going away, and will it continue in 2022?

In the short term, at least into 2022, many companies are extending working from home. Google is one of them. Other companies, including Lyft and Asana, are also pushing their return to the office dates back to 2022.

Other companies said they plan to transition to a hybrid arrangement where workers will spend part of the time in the office and part of the time working from home.

There were no hard statistics available as to how many companies plan to push back the date of office return, allow part-time work from home, or forgo the office altogether and form a permanent remote workforce.

It is expected that many companies are waiting to see what COVID trends do in the next several months before making the decision.

It is also expected that many companies will take the lead of larger companies like Google to make their decisions. For the short term, it looks like the trend of working from home is here to stay, at least until next year.

How much has remote work increased in 2020?

The pandemic caused the biggest work-from-home experiment in history on a global basis.

Before the pandemic hit, approximately 7% of the U.S. workforce worked from home. Regional variations in these numbers exist and can range between 6-11% depending on the part of the country.

One thing to note is that the United States lags other parts of the world when it comes to remote workers.

For instance, 18% of Swedes, 21% of Dutch, and 23% of Danes work from home, which is nearly 2-3 times those in the United States.

The pandemic has shifted the number of workers in the U.S. who are working from home, but this number is still comparatively small from a global perspective.

What companies are staying remote?

Not all companies want to call workers back into the office. Some have announced that they are closing their office doors permanently and will only be using remote workers from now on.

It is not known how many companies will ultimately choose this option, but over 100 companies in the United States have announced that they will only hire remote workers from now on. Some of these companies include:

  • GoDaddy
  • Shopify
  • Spotify
  • Upwork
  • InVision
  • Stripe
  • Twitch
  • Oyster
  • GitHub


These are some of the biggest and well-known companies that have made this announcement. There are probably many small to medium size organizations that will make this switch, too.

The bottom line is that if you want to work for a large company and you want to work from home, you have many more opportunities now than in the past. This number continues to grow as many companies see the advantages and cost savings of this option.

10 Important Remote Workplace Trends

  1. The option to work from home makes a business more attractive to employees, which might help business attract top talent.
  2. In a 2020 study, half the workers said they would not return to a job that did not offer the ability to work from home.
  3. As of 2020, people were using video conferencing 50% more than before COVID-19.
  4. In 2020, 79% of the people thought that video conferencing was as productive or more productive than in-person meetings.
  5. Remote workers worked an average of 26 more hours per month during the pandemic, which amounts to one extra day per week.
  6. In a 2020 survey, 43% of the respondents were afraid that working from home would affect their career progression in the future.
  7. In terms of working environment, 67% said they worked from their home office, and 49% said they worked from their dining room table or their sofa. Approximately 42% had worked from their bedroom, and 15% had worked from a closet.
  8. Workers do not want to be monitored at home with nearly 32% saying they would be unhappy but stay with the company, and 11% said they would quit if this were implemented.
  9. On average, working remotely saves about 40 minutes a day on the commute.
  10. On average, employees said they were saving about $479 per month, which is almost $6,000 per year, working from home.

Key Takeaway: COVID-19 has opened the eyes of many workers as to what working could be, and they are beginning to see this as an attractive option when considering who to work for and how long they will stay.

As workers demand these options more in the future, companies who are not in favor of working remotely will need to rethink their strategies for attracting and retaining employees.

Both the companies and employees save money with remote work, and improvements in technology make this possible for an increasing number of companies. It is expected that working from home will continue to become an increasingly popular way of life for businesses and workers in the future.

The pandemic caused a rapid shift in the workforce almost overnight, and now, companies and employees have had well over a year to work out the challenges.

The question is whether once the pandemic is declared over if all of the workers will be ordered back to the office or if companies will see a benefit to allowing people to work from home.

This has been the topic of many research studies recently. Let’s see what the data seems to indicate.

What is the future of remote working?

Working from home has its advantages, and it has its challenges. In a Chinese study, workers were found to be more productive when working from, but the study also found that working from home is not a perfect world or a perfect solution.

The study found that working from home caused a greater blurring of the line between work life and home life.

Working from home can be difficult when you have children and dogs barking in the background. Even though more workers found themselves working from home, they were only in certain sectors.

This study Chinese concluded that nearly 60% of all jobs cannot be done from home. This means that only a small portion of the workforce even has the option of continuing to work from home.

One factor that might have influenced these findings is cultural differences in views about work and home life.

The study involved phone bank workers, which could be more difficult with others in the home. The results of this study might not hold for those in other countries or occupations.

The question of whether working from home is here to stay depends on how you define it.

Of the jobs that can be done from home and the workers who are currently filling them, it is expected that many will be allowed to continue to work from home on a part-time basis, but they will be required to go into the office for certain days of the week.

The future of working from home is not black and white, and many companies are offering a hybrid of office work and working from home.

Is remote work going away, and will it continue in 2022?

In the short term, at least into 2022, many companies are extending working from home. Google is one of them. Other companies, including Lyft and Asana, are also pushing their return to the office dates back to 2022.

Other companies said they plan to transition to a hybrid arrangement where workers will spend part of the time in the office and part of the time working from home.

There were no hard statistics available as to how many companies plan to push back the date of office return, allow part-time work from home, or forgo the office altogether and form a permanent remote workforce.

It is expected that many companies are waiting to see what COVID trends do in the next several months before making the decision.

It is also expected that many companies will take the lead of larger companies like Google to make their decisions. For the short term, it looks like the trend of working from home is here to stay, at least until next year.

How much has remote work increased in 2020?

The pandemic caused the biggest work-from-home experiment in history on a global basis.

Before the pandemic hit, approximately 7% of the U.S. workforce worked from home. Regional variations in these numbers exist and can range between 6-11% depending on the part of the country.

One thing to note is that the United States lags other parts of the world when it comes to remote workers.

For instance, 18% of Swedes, 21% of Dutch, and 23% of Danes work from home, which is nearly 2-3 times those in the United States.

The pandemic has shifted the number of workers in the U.S. who are working from home, but this number is still comparatively small from a global perspective.

What companies are staying remote?

Not all companies want to call workers back into the office. Some have announced that they are closing their office doors permanently and will only be using remote workers from now on.

It is not known how many companies will ultimately choose this option, but over 100 companies in the United States have announced that they will only hire remote workers from now on. Some of these companies include:

  • GoDaddy
  • Shopify
  • Spotify
  • Upwork
  • InVision
  • Stripe
  • Twitch
  • Oyster
  • GitHub


These are some of the biggest and well-known companies that have made this announcement. There are probably many small to medium size organizations that will make this switch, too.

The bottom line is that if you want to work for a large company and you want to work from home, you have many more opportunities now than in the past. This number continues to grow as many companies see the advantages and cost savings of this option.

10 Important Remote Workplace Trends

  1. The option to work from home makes a business more attractive to employees, which might help business attract top talent.
  2. In a 2020 study, half the workers said they would not return to a job that did not offer the ability to work from home.
  3. As of 2020, people were using video conferencing 50% more than before COVID-19.
  4. In 2020, 79% of the people thought that video conferencing was as productive or more productive than in-person meetings.
  5. Remote workers worked an average of 26 more hours per month during the pandemic, which amounts to one extra day per week.
  6. In a 2020 survey, 43% of the respondents were afraid that working from home would affect their career progression in the future.
  7. In terms of working environment, 67% said they worked from their home office, and 49% said they worked from their dining room table or their sofa. Approximately 42% had worked from their bedroom, and 15% had worked from a closet.
  8. Workers do not want to be monitored at home with nearly 32% saying they would be unhappy but stay with the company, and 11% said they would quit if this were implemented.
  9. On average, working remotely saves about 40 minutes a day on the commute.
  10. On average, employees said they were saving about $479 per month, which is almost $6,000 per year, working from home.

Key Takeaway: COVID-19 has opened the eyes of many workers as to what working could be, and they are beginning to see this as an attractive option when considering who to work for and how long they will stay.

As workers demand these options more in the future, companies who are not in favor of working remotely will need to rethink their strategies for attracting and retaining employees.

Both the companies and employees save money with remote work, and improvements in technology make this possible for an increasing number of companies. It is expected that working from home will continue to become an increasingly popular way of life for businesses and workers in the future.

The pandemic caused a rapid shift in the workforce almost overnight, and now, companies and employees have had well over a year to work out the challenges.

The question is whether once the pandemic is declared over if all of the workers will be ordered back to the office or if companies will see a benefit to allowing people to work from home.

This has been the topic of many research studies recently. Let’s see what the data seems to indicate.

What is the future of remote working?

Working from home has its advantages, and it has its challenges. In a Chinese study, workers were found to be more productive when working from, but the study also found that working from home is not a perfect world or a perfect solution.

The study found that working from home caused a greater blurring of the line between work life and home life.

Working from home can be difficult when you have children and dogs barking in the background. Even though more workers found themselves working from home, they were only in certain sectors.

This study Chinese concluded that nearly 60% of all jobs cannot be done from home. This means that only a small portion of the workforce even has the option of continuing to work from home.

One factor that might have influenced these findings is cultural differences in views about work and home life.

The study involved phone bank workers, which could be more difficult with others in the home. The results of this study might not hold for those in other countries or occupations.

The question of whether working from home is here to stay depends on how you define it.

Of the jobs that can be done from home and the workers who are currently filling them, it is expected that many will be allowed to continue to work from home on a part-time basis, but they will be required to go into the office for certain days of the week.

The future of working from home is not black and white, and many companies are offering a hybrid of office work and working from home.

Is remote work going away, and will it continue in 2022?

In the short term, at least into 2022, many companies are extending working from home. Google is one of them. Other companies, including Lyft and Asana, are also pushing their return to the office dates back to 2022.

Other companies said they plan to transition to a hybrid arrangement where workers will spend part of the time in the office and part of the time working from home.

There were no hard statistics available as to how many companies plan to push back the date of office return, allow part-time work from home, or forgo the office altogether and form a permanent remote workforce.

It is expected that many companies are waiting to see what COVID trends do in the next several months before making the decision.

It is also expected that many companies will take the lead of larger companies like Google to make their decisions. For the short term, it looks like the trend of working from home is here to stay, at least until next year.

How much has remote work increased in 2020?

The pandemic caused the biggest work-from-home experiment in history on a global basis.

Before the pandemic hit, approximately 7% of the U.S. workforce worked from home. Regional variations in these numbers exist and can range between 6-11% depending on the part of the country.

One thing to note is that the United States lags other parts of the world when it comes to remote workers.

For instance, 18% of Swedes, 21% of Dutch, and 23% of Danes work from home, which is nearly 2-3 times those in the United States.

The pandemic has shifted the number of workers in the U.S. who are working from home, but this number is still comparatively small from a global perspective.

What companies are staying remote?

Not all companies want to call workers back into the office. Some have announced that they are closing their office doors permanently and will only be using remote workers from now on.

It is not known how many companies will ultimately choose this option, but over 100 companies in the United States have announced that they will only hire remote workers from now on. Some of these companies include:

  • GoDaddy
  • Shopify
  • Spotify
  • Upwork
  • InVision
  • Stripe
  • Twitch
  • Oyster
  • GitHub


These are some of the biggest and well-known companies that have made this announcement. There are probably many small to medium size organizations that will make this switch, too.

The bottom line is that if you want to work for a large company and you want to work from home, you have many more opportunities now than in the past. This number continues to grow as many companies see the advantages and cost savings of this option.

10 Important Remote Workplace Trends

  1. The option to work from home makes a business more attractive to employees, which might help business attract top talent.
  2. In a 2020 study, half the workers said they would not return to a job that did not offer the ability to work from home.
  3. As of 2020, people were using video conferencing 50% more than before COVID-19.
  4. In 2020, 79% of the people thought that video conferencing was as productive or more productive than in-person meetings.
  5. Remote workers worked an average of 26 more hours per month during the pandemic, which amounts to one extra day per week.
  6. In a 2020 survey, 43% of the respondents were afraid that working from home would affect their career progression in the future.
  7. In terms of working environment, 67% said they worked from their home office, and 49% said they worked from their dining room table or their sofa. Approximately 42% had worked from their bedroom, and 15% had worked from a closet.
  8. Workers do not want to be monitored at home with nearly 32% saying they would be unhappy but stay with the company, and 11% said they would quit if this were implemented.
  9. On average, working remotely saves about 40 minutes a day on the commute.
  10. On average, employees said they were saving about $479 per month, which is almost $6,000 per year, working from home.

Key Takeaway: COVID-19 has opened the eyes of many workers as to what working could be, and they are beginning to see this as an attractive option when considering who to work for and how long they will stay.

As workers demand these options more in the future, companies who are not in favor of working remotely will need to rethink their strategies for attracting and retaining employees.

Both the companies and employees save money with remote work, and improvements in technology make this possible for an increasing number of companies. It is expected that working from home will continue to become an increasingly popular way of life for businesses and workers in the future.

The pandemic caused a rapid shift in the workforce almost overnight, and now, companies and employees have had well over a year to work out the challenges.

The question is whether once the pandemic is declared over if all of the workers will be ordered back to the office or if companies will see a benefit to allowing people to work from home.

This has been the topic of many research studies recently. Let’s see what the data seems to indicate.

What is the future of remote working?

Working from home has its advantages, and it has its challenges. In a Chinese study, workers were found to be more productive when working from, but the study also found that working from home is not a perfect world or a perfect solution.

The study found that working from home caused a greater blurring of the line between work life and home life.

Working from home can be difficult when you have children and dogs barking in the background. Even though more workers found themselves working from home, they were only in certain sectors.

This study Chinese concluded that nearly 60% of all jobs cannot be done from home. This means that only a small portion of the workforce even has the option of continuing to work from home.

One factor that might have influenced these findings is cultural differences in views about work and home life.

The study involved phone bank workers, which could be more difficult with others in the home. The results of this study might not hold for those in other countries or occupations.

The question of whether working from home is here to stay depends on how you define it.

Of the jobs that can be done from home and the workers who are currently filling them, it is expected that many will be allowed to continue to work from home on a part-time basis, but they will be required to go into the office for certain days of the week.

The future of working from home is not black and white, and many companies are offering a hybrid of office work and working from home.

Is remote work going away, and will it continue in 2022?

In the short term, at least into 2022, many companies are extending working from home. Google is one of them. Other companies, including Lyft and Asana, are also pushing their return to the office dates back to 2022.

Other companies said they plan to transition to a hybrid arrangement where workers will spend part of the time in the office and part of the time working from home.

There were no hard statistics available as to how many companies plan to push back the date of office return, allow part-time work from home, or forgo the office altogether and form a permanent remote workforce.

It is expected that many companies are waiting to see what COVID trends do in the next several months before making the decision.

It is also expected that many companies will take the lead of larger companies like Google to make their decisions. For the short term, it looks like the trend of working from home is here to stay, at least until next year.

How much has remote work increased in 2020?

The pandemic caused the biggest work-from-home experiment in history on a global basis.

Before the pandemic hit, approximately 7% of the U.S. workforce worked from home. Regional variations in these numbers exist and can range between 6-11% depending on the part of the country.

One thing to note is that the United States lags other parts of the world when it comes to remote workers.

For instance, 18% of Swedes, 21% of Dutch, and 23% of Danes work from home, which is nearly 2-3 times those in the United States.

The pandemic has shifted the number of workers in the U.S. who are working from home, but this number is still comparatively small from a global perspective.

What companies are staying remote?

Not all companies want to call workers back into the office. Some have announced that they are closing their office doors permanently and will only be using remote workers from now on.

It is not known how many companies will ultimately choose this option, but over 100 companies in the United States have announced that they will only hire remote workers from now on. Some of these companies include:

  • GoDaddy
  • Shopify
  • Spotify
  • Upwork
  • InVision
  • Stripe
  • Twitch
  • Oyster
  • GitHub


These are some of the biggest and well-known companies that have made this announcement. There are probably many small to medium size organizations that will make this switch, too.

The bottom line is that if you want to work for a large company and you want to work from home, you have many more opportunities now than in the past. This number continues to grow as many companies see the advantages and cost savings of this option.

10 Important Remote Workplace Trends

  1. The option to work from home makes a business more attractive to employees, which might help business attract top talent.
  2. In a 2020 study, half the workers said they would not return to a job that did not offer the ability to work from home.
  3. As of 2020, people were using video conferencing 50% more than before COVID-19.
  4. In 2020, 79% of the people thought that video conferencing was as productive or more productive than in-person meetings.
  5. Remote workers worked an average of 26 more hours per month during the pandemic, which amounts to one extra day per week.
  6. In a 2020 survey, 43% of the respondents were afraid that working from home would affect their career progression in the future.
  7. In terms of working environment, 67% said they worked from their home office, and 49% said they worked from their dining room table or their sofa. Approximately 42% had worked from their bedroom, and 15% had worked from a closet.
  8. Workers do not want to be monitored at home with nearly 32% saying they would be unhappy but stay with the company, and 11% said they would quit if this were implemented.
  9. On average, working remotely saves about 40 minutes a day on the commute.
  10. On average, employees said they were saving about $479 per month, which is almost $6,000 per year, working from home.

Key Takeaway: COVID-19 has opened the eyes of many workers as to what working could be, and they are beginning to see this as an attractive option when considering who to work for and how long they will stay.

As workers demand these options more in the future, companies who are not in favor of working remotely will need to rethink their strategies for attracting and retaining employees.

Both the companies and employees save money with remote work, and improvements in technology make this possible for an increasing number of companies. It is expected that working from home will continue to become an increasingly popular way of life for businesses and workers in the future.

The pandemic caused a rapid shift in the workforce almost overnight, and now, companies and employees have had well over a year to work out the challenges.

The question is whether once the pandemic is declared over if all of the workers will be ordered back to the office or if companies will see a benefit to allowing people to work from home.

This has been the topic of many research studies recently. Let’s see what the data seems to indicate.

What is the future of remote working?

Working from home has its advantages, and it has its challenges. In a Chinese study, workers were found to be more productive when working from, but the study also found that working from home is not a perfect world or a perfect solution.

The study found that working from home caused a greater blurring of the line between work life and home life.

Working from home can be difficult when you have children and dogs barking in the background. Even though more workers found themselves working from home, they were only in certain sectors.

This study Chinese concluded that nearly 60% of all jobs cannot be done from home. This means that only a small portion of the workforce even has the option of continuing to work from home.

One factor that might have influenced these findings is cultural differences in views about work and home life.

The study involved phone bank workers, which could be more difficult with others in the home. The results of this study might not hold for those in other countries or occupations.

The question of whether working from home is here to stay depends on how you define it.

Of the jobs that can be done from home and the workers who are currently filling them, it is expected that many will be allowed to continue to work from home on a part-time basis, but they will be required to go into the office for certain days of the week.

The future of working from home is not black and white, and many companies are offering a hybrid of office work and working from home.

Is remote work going away, and will it continue in 2022?

In the short term, at least into 2022, many companies are extending working from home. Google is one of them. Other companies, including Lyft and Asana, are also pushing their return to the office dates back to 2022.

Other companies said they plan to transition to a hybrid arrangement where workers will spend part of the time in the office and part of the time working from home.

There were no hard statistics available as to how many companies plan to push back the date of office return, allow part-time work from home, or forgo the office altogether and form a permanent remote workforce.

It is expected that many companies are waiting to see what COVID trends do in the next several months before making the decision.

It is also expected that many companies will take the lead of larger companies like Google to make their decisions. For the short term, it looks like the trend of working from home is here to stay, at least until next year.

How much has remote work increased in 2020?

The pandemic caused the biggest work-from-home experiment in history on a global basis.

Before the pandemic hit, approximately 7% of the U.S. workforce worked from home. Regional variations in these numbers exist and can range between 6-11% depending on the part of the country.

One thing to note is that the United States lags other parts of the world when it comes to remote workers.

For instance, 18% of Swedes, 21% of Dutch, and 23% of Danes work from home, which is nearly 2-3 times those in the United States.

The pandemic has shifted the number of workers in the U.S. who are working from home, but this number is still comparatively small from a global perspective.

What companies are staying remote?

Not all companies want to call workers back into the office. Some have announced that they are closing their office doors permanently and will only be using remote workers from now on.

It is not known how many companies will ultimately choose this option, but over 100 companies in the United States have announced that they will only hire remote workers from now on. Some of these companies include:

  • GoDaddy
  • Shopify
  • Spotify
  • Upwork
  • InVision
  • Stripe
  • Twitch
  • Oyster
  • GitHub


These are some of the biggest and well-known companies that have made this announcement. There are probably many small to medium size organizations that will make this switch, too.

The bottom line is that if you want to work for a large company and you want to work from home, you have many more opportunities now than in the past. This number continues to grow as many companies see the advantages and cost savings of this option.

10 Important Remote Workplace Trends

  1. The option to work from home makes a business more attractive to employees, which might help business attract top talent.
  2. In a 2020 study, half the workers said they would not return to a job that did not offer the ability to work from home.
  3. As of 2020, people were using video conferencing 50% more than before COVID-19.
  4. In 2020, 79% of the people thought that video conferencing was as productive or more productive than in-person meetings.
  5. Remote workers worked an average of 26 more hours per month during the pandemic, which amounts to one extra day per week.
  6. In a 2020 survey, 43% of the respondents were afraid that working from home would affect their career progression in the future.
  7. In terms of working environment, 67% said they worked from their home office, and 49% said they worked from their dining room table or their sofa. Approximately 42% had worked from their bedroom, and 15% had worked from a closet.
  8. Workers do not want to be monitored at home with nearly 32% saying they would be unhappy but stay with the company, and 11% said they would quit if this were implemented.
  9. On average, working remotely saves about 40 minutes a day on the commute.
  10. On average, employees said they were saving about $479 per month, which is almost $6,000 per year, working from home.

Key Takeaway: COVID-19 has opened the eyes of many workers as to what working could be, and they are beginning to see this as an attractive option when considering who to work for and how long they will stay.

As workers demand these options more in the future, companies who are not in favor of working remotely will need to rethink their strategies for attracting and retaining employees.

Both the companies and employees save money with remote work, and improvements in technology make this possible for an increasing number of companies. It is expected that working from home will continue to become an increasingly popular way of life for businesses and workers in the future.

The pandemic caused a rapid shift in the workforce almost overnight, and now, companies and employees have had well over a year to work out the challenges.

The question is whether once the pandemic is declared over if all of the workers will be ordered back to the office or if companies will see a benefit to allowing people to work from home.

This has been the topic of many research studies recently. Let’s see what the data seems to indicate.

What is the future of remote working?

Working from home has its advantages, and it has its challenges. In a Chinese study, workers were found to be more productive when working from, but the study also found that working from home is not a perfect world or a perfect solution.

The study found that working from home caused a greater blurring of the line between work life and home life.

Working from home can be difficult when you have children and dogs barking in the background. Even though more workers found themselves working from home, they were only in certain sectors.

This study Chinese concluded that nearly 60% of all jobs cannot be done from home. This means that only a small portion of the workforce even has the option of continuing to work from home.

One factor that might have influenced these findings is cultural differences in views about work and home life.

The study involved phone bank workers, which could be more difficult with others in the home. The results of this study might not hold for those in other countries or occupations.

The question of whether working from home is here to stay depends on how you define it.

Of the jobs that can be done from home and the workers who are currently filling them, it is expected that many will be allowed to continue to work from home on a part-time basis, but they will be required to go into the office for certain days of the week.

The future of working from home is not black and white, and many companies are offering a hybrid of office work and working from home.

Is remote work going away, and will it continue in 2022?

In the short term, at least into 2022, many companies are extending working from home. Google is one of them. Other companies, including Lyft and Asana, are also pushing their return to the office dates back to 2022.

Other companies said they plan to transition to a hybrid arrangement where workers will spend part of the time in the office and part of the time working from home.

There were no hard statistics available as to how many companies plan to push back the date of office return, allow part-time work from home, or forgo the office altogether and form a permanent remote workforce.

It is expected that many companies are waiting to see what COVID trends do in the next several months before making the decision.

It is also expected that many companies will take the lead of larger companies like Google to make their decisions. For the short term, it looks like the trend of working from home is here to stay, at least until next year.

How much has remote work increased in 2020?

The pandemic caused the biggest work-from-home experiment in history on a global basis.

Before the pandemic hit, approximately 7% of the U.S. workforce worked from home. Regional variations in these numbers exist and can range between 6-11% depending on the part of the country.

One thing to note is that the United States lags other parts of the world when it comes to remote workers.

For instance, 18% of Swedes, 21% of Dutch, and 23% of Danes work from home, which is nearly 2-3 times those in the United States.

The pandemic has shifted the number of workers in the U.S. who are working from home, but this number is still comparatively small from a global perspective.

What companies are staying remote?

Not all companies want to call workers back into the office. Some have announced that they are closing their office doors permanently and will only be using remote workers from now on.

It is not known how many companies will ultimately choose this option, but over 100 companies in the United States have announced that they will only hire remote workers from now on. Some of these companies include:

  • GoDaddy
  • Shopify
  • Spotify
  • Upwork
  • InVision
  • Stripe
  • Twitch
  • Oyster
  • GitHub


These are some of the biggest and well-known companies that have made this announcement. There are probably many small to medium size organizations that will make this switch, too.

The bottom line is that if you want to work for a large company and you want to work from home, you have many more opportunities now than in the past. This number continues to grow as many companies see the advantages and cost savings of this option.

10 Important Remote Workplace Trends

  1. The option to work from home makes a business more attractive to employees, which might help business attract top talent.
  2. In a 2020 study, half the workers said they would not return to a job that did not offer the ability to work from home.
  3. As of 2020, people were using video conferencing 50% more than before COVID-19.
  4. In 2020, 79% of the people thought that video conferencing was as productive or more productive than in-person meetings.
  5. Remote workers worked an average of 26 more hours per month during the pandemic, which amounts to one extra day per week.
  6. In a 2020 survey, 43% of the respondents were afraid that working from home would affect their career progression in the future.
  7. In terms of working environment, 67% said they worked from their home office, and 49% said they worked from their dining room table or their sofa. Approximately 42% had worked from their bedroom, and 15% had worked from a closet.
  8. Workers do not want to be monitored at home with nearly 32% saying they would be unhappy but stay with the company, and 11% said they would quit if this were implemented.
  9. On average, working remotely saves about 40 minutes a day on the commute.
  10. On average, employees said they were saving about $479 per month, which is almost $6,000 per year, working from home.

Key Takeaway: COVID-19 has opened the eyes of many workers as to what working could be, and they are beginning to see this as an attractive option when considering who to work for and how long they will stay.

As workers demand these options more in the future, companies who are not in favor of working remotely will need to rethink their strategies for attracting and retaining employees.

Both the companies and employees save money with remote work, and improvements in technology make this possible for an increasing number of companies. It is expected that working from home will continue to become an increasingly popular way of life for businesses and workers in the future.

The pandemic caused a rapid shift in the workforce almost overnight, and now, companies and employees have had well over a year to work out the challenges.

The question is whether once the pandemic is declared over if all of the workers will be ordered back to the office or if companies will see a benefit to allowing people to work from home.

This has been the topic of many research studies recently. Let’s see what the data seems to indicate.

What is the future of remote working?

Working from home has its advantages, and it has its challenges. In a Chinese study, workers were found to be more productive when working from, but the study also found that working from home is not a perfect world or a perfect solution.

The study found that working from home caused a greater blurring of the line between work life and home life.

Working from home can be difficult when you have children and dogs barking in the background. Even though more workers found themselves working from home, they were only in certain sectors.

This study Chinese concluded that nearly 60% of all jobs cannot be done from home. This means that only a small portion of the workforce even has the option of continuing to work from home.

One factor that might have influenced these findings is cultural differences in views about work and home life.

The study involved phone bank workers, which could be more difficult with others in the home. The results of this study might not hold for those in other countries or occupations.

The question of whether working from home is here to stay depends on how you define it.

Of the jobs that can be done from home and the workers who are currently filling them, it is expected that many will be allowed to continue to work from home on a part-time basis, but they will be required to go into the office for certain days of the week.

The future of working from home is not black and white, and many companies are offering a hybrid of office work and working from home.

Is remote work going away, and will it continue in 2022?

In the short term, at least into 2022, many companies are extending working from home. Google is one of them. Other companies, including Lyft and Asana, are also pushing their return to the office dates back to 2022.

Other companies said they plan to transition to a hybrid arrangement where workers will spend part of the time in the office and part of the time working from home.

There were no hard statistics available as to how many companies plan to push back the date of office return, allow part-time work from home, or forgo the office altogether and form a permanent remote workforce.

It is expected that many companies are waiting to see what COVID trends do in the next several months before making the decision.

It is also expected that many companies will take the lead of larger companies like Google to make their decisions. For the short term, it looks like the trend of working from home is here to stay, at least until next year.

How much has remote work increased in 2020?

The pandemic caused the biggest work-from-home experiment in history on a global basis.

Before the pandemic hit, approximately 7% of the U.S. workforce worked from home. Regional variations in these numbers exist and can range between 6-11% depending on the part of the country.

One thing to note is that the United States lags other parts of the world when it comes to remote workers.

For instance, 18% of Swedes, 21% of Dutch, and 23% of Danes work from home, which is nearly 2-3 times those in the United States.

The pandemic has shifted the number of workers in the U.S. who are working from home, but this number is still comparatively small from a global perspective.

What companies are staying remote?

Not all companies want to call workers back into the office. Some have announced that they are closing their office doors permanently and will only be using remote workers from now on.

It is not known how many companies will ultimately choose this option, but over 100 companies in the United States have announced that they will only hire remote workers from now on. Some of these companies include:

  • GoDaddy
  • Shopify
  • Spotify
  • Upwork
  • InVision
  • Stripe
  • Twitch
  • Oyster
  • GitHub


These are some of the biggest and well-known companies that have made this announcement. There are probably many small to medium size organizations that will make this switch, too.

The bottom line is that if you want to work for a large company and you want to work from home, you have many more opportunities now than in the past. This number continues to grow as many companies see the advantages and cost savings of this option.

10 Important Remote Workplace Trends

  1. The option to work from home makes a business more attractive to employees, which might help business attract top talent.
  2. In a 2020 study, half the workers said they would not return to a job that did not offer the ability to work from home.
  3. As of 2020, people were using video conferencing 50% more than before COVID-19.
  4. In 2020, 79% of the people thought that video conferencing was as productive or more productive than in-person meetings.
  5. Remote workers worked an average of 26 more hours per month during the pandemic, which amounts to one extra day per week.
  6. In a 2020 survey, 43% of the respondents were afraid that working from home would affect their career progression in the future.
  7. In terms of working environment, 67% said they worked from their home office, and 49% said they worked from their dining room table or their sofa. Approximately 42% had worked from their bedroom, and 15% had worked from a closet.
  8. Workers do not want to be monitored at home with nearly 32% saying they would be unhappy but stay with the company, and 11% said they would quit if this were implemented.
  9. On average, working remotely saves about 40 minutes a day on the commute.
  10. On average, employees said they were saving about $479 per month, which is almost $6,000 per year, working from home.

Key Takeaway: COVID-19 has opened the eyes of many workers as to what working could be, and they are beginning to see this as an attractive option when considering who to work for and how long they will stay.

As workers demand these options more in the future, companies who are not in favor of working remotely will need to rethink their strategies for attracting and retaining employees.

Both the companies and employees save money with remote work, and improvements in technology make this possible for an increasing number of companies. It is expected that working from home will continue to become an increasingly popular way of life for businesses and workers in the future.

The pandemic caused a rapid shift in the workforce almost overnight, and now, companies and employees have had well over a year to work out the challenges.

The question is whether once the pandemic is declared over if all of the workers will be ordered back to the office or if companies will see a benefit to allowing people to work from home.

This has been the topic of many research studies recently. Let’s see what the data seems to indicate.

What is the future of remote working?

Working from home has its advantages, and it has its challenges. In a Chinese study, workers were found to be more productive when working from, but the study also found that working from home is not a perfect world or a perfect solution.

The study found that working from home caused a greater blurring of the line between work life and home life.

Working from home can be difficult when you have children and dogs barking in the background. Even though more workers found themselves working from home, they were only in certain sectors.

This study Chinese concluded that nearly 60% of all jobs cannot be done from home. This means that only a small portion of the workforce even has the option of continuing to work from home.

One factor that might have influenced these findings is cultural differences in views about work and home life.

The study involved phone bank workers, which could be more difficult with others in the home. The results of this study might not hold for those in other countries or occupations.

The question of whether working from home is here to stay depends on how you define it.

Of the jobs that can be done from home and the workers who are currently filling them, it is expected that many will be allowed to continue to work from home on a part-time basis, but they will be required to go into the office for certain days of the week.

The future of working from home is not black and white, and many companies are offering a hybrid of office work and working from home.

Is remote work going away, and will it continue in 2022?

In the short term, at least into 2022, many companies are extending working from home. Google is one of them. Other companies, including Lyft and Asana, are also pushing their return to the office dates back to 2022.

Other companies said they plan to transition to a hybrid arrangement where workers will spend part of the time in the office and part of the time working from home.

There were no hard statistics available as to how many companies plan to push back the date of office return, allow part-time work from home, or forgo the office altogether and form a permanent remote workforce.

It is expected that many companies are waiting to see what COVID trends do in the next several months before making the decision.

It is also expected that many companies will take the lead of larger companies like Google to make their decisions. For the short term, it looks like the trend of working from home is here to stay, at least until next year.

How much has remote work increased in 2020?

The pandemic caused the biggest work-from-home experiment in history on a global basis.

Before the pandemic hit, approximately 7% of the U.S. workforce worked from home. Regional variations in these numbers exist and can range between 6-11% depending on the part of the country.

One thing to note is that the United States lags other parts of the world when it comes to remote workers.

For instance, 18% of Swedes, 21% of Dutch, and 23% of Danes work from home, which is nearly 2-3 times those in the United States.

The pandemic has shifted the number of workers in the U.S. who are working from home, but this number is still comparatively small from a global perspective.

What companies are staying remote?

Not all companies want to call workers back into the office. Some have announced that they are closing their office doors permanently and will only be using remote workers from now on.

It is not known how many companies will ultimately choose this option, but over 100 companies in the United States have announced that they will only hire remote workers from now on. Some of these companies include:

  • GoDaddy
  • Shopify
  • Spotify
  • Upwork
  • InVision
  • Stripe
  • Twitch
  • Oyster
  • GitHub


These are some of the biggest and well-known companies that have made this announcement. There are probably many small to medium size organizations that will make this switch, too.

The bottom line is that if you want to work for a large company and you want to work from home, you have many more opportunities now than in the past. This number continues to grow as many companies see the advantages and cost savings of this option.

10 Important Remote Workplace Trends

  1. The option to work from home makes a business more attractive to employees, which might help business attract top talent.
  2. In a 2020 study, half the workers said they would not return to a job that did not offer the ability to work from home.
  3. As of 2020, people were using video conferencing 50% more than before COVID-19.
  4. In 2020, 79% of the people thought that video conferencing was as productive or more productive than in-person meetings.
  5. Remote workers worked an average of 26 more hours per month during the pandemic, which amounts to one extra day per week.
  6. In a 2020 survey, 43% of the respondents were afraid that working from home would affect their career progression in the future.
  7. In terms of working environment, 67% said they worked from their home office, and 49% said they worked from their dining room table or their sofa. Approximately 42% had worked from their bedroom, and 15% had worked from a closet.
  8. Workers do not want to be monitored at home with nearly 32% saying they would be unhappy but stay with the company, and 11% said they would quit if this were implemented.
  9. On average, working remotely saves about 40 minutes a day on the commute.
  10. On average, employees said they were saving about $479 per month, which is almost $6,000 per year, working from home.

Key Takeaway: COVID-19 has opened the eyes of many workers as to what working could be, and they are beginning to see this as an attractive option when considering who to work for and how long they will stay.

As workers demand these options more in the future, companies who are not in favor of working remotely will need to rethink their strategies for attracting and retaining employees.

Both the companies and employees save money with remote work, and improvements in technology make this possible for an increasing number of companies. It is expected that working from home will continue to become an increasingly popular way of life for businesses and workers in the future.

The pandemic caused a rapid shift in the workforce almost overnight, and now, companies and employees have had well over a year to work out the challenges.

The question is whether once the pandemic is declared over if all of the workers will be ordered back to the office or if companies will see a benefit to allowing people to work from home.

This has been the topic of many research studies recently. Let’s see what the data seems to indicate.

What is the future of remote working?

Working from home has its advantages, and it has its challenges. In a Chinese study, workers were found to be more productive when working from, but the study also found that working from home is not a perfect world or a perfect solution.

The study found that working from home caused a greater blurring of the line between work life and home life.

Working from home can be difficult when you have children and dogs barking in the background. Even though more workers found themselves working from home, they were only in certain sectors.

This study Chinese concluded that nearly 60% of all jobs cannot be done from home. This means that only a small portion of the workforce even has the option of continuing to work from home.

One factor that might have influenced these findings is cultural differences in views about work and home life.

The study involved phone bank workers, which could be more difficult with others in the home. The results of this study might not hold for those in other countries or occupations.

The question of whether working from home is here to stay depends on how you define it.

Of the jobs that can be done from home and the workers who are currently filling them, it is expected that many will be allowed to continue to work from home on a part-time basis, but they will be required to go into the office for certain days of the week.

The future of working from home is not black and white, and many companies are offering a hybrid of office work and working from home.

Is remote work going away, and will it continue in 2022?

In the short term, at least into 2022, many companies are extending working from home. Google is one of them. Other companies, including Lyft and Asana, are also pushing their return to the office dates back to 2022.

Other companies said they plan to transition to a hybrid arrangement where workers will spend part of the time in the office and part of the time working from home.

There were no hard statistics available as to how many companies plan to push back the date of office return, allow part-time work from home, or forgo the office altogether and form a permanent remote workforce.

It is expected that many companies are waiting to see what COVID trends do in the next several months before making the decision.

It is also expected that many companies will take the lead of larger companies like Google to make their decisions. For the short term, it looks like the trend of working from home is here to stay, at least until next year.

How much has remote work increased in 2020?

The pandemic caused the biggest work-from-home experiment in history on a global basis.

Before the pandemic hit, approximately 7% of the U.S. workforce worked from home. Regional variations in these numbers exist and can range between 6-11% depending on the part of the country.

One thing to note is that the United States lags other parts of the world when it comes to remote workers.

For instance, 18% of Swedes, 21% of Dutch, and 23% of Danes work from home, which is nearly 2-3 times those in the United States.

The pandemic has shifted the number of workers in the U.S. who are working from home, but this number is still comparatively small from a global perspective.

What companies are staying remote?

Not all companies want to call workers back into the office. Some have announced that they are closing their office doors permanently and will only be using remote workers from now on.

It is not known how many companies will ultimately choose this option, but over 100 companies in the United States have announced that they will only hire remote workers from now on. Some of these companies include:

  • GoDaddy
  • Shopify
  • Spotify
  • Upwork
  • InVision
  • Stripe
  • Twitch
  • Oyster
  • GitHub


These are some of the biggest and well-known companies that have made this announcement. There are probably many small to medium size organizations that will make this switch, too.

The bottom line is that if you want to work for a large company and you want to work from home, you have many more opportunities now than in the past. This number continues to grow as many companies see the advantages and cost savings of this option.

10 Important Remote Workplace Trends

  1. The option to work from home makes a business more attractive to employees, which might help business attract top talent.
  2. In a 2020 study, half the workers said they would not return to a job that did not offer the ability to work from home.
  3. As of 2020, people were using video conferencing 50% more than before COVID-19.
  4. In 2020, 79% of the people thought that video conferencing was as productive or more productive than in-person meetings.
  5. Remote workers worked an average of 26 more hours per month during the pandemic, which amounts to one extra day per week.
  6. In a 2020 survey, 43% of the respondents were afraid that working from home would affect their career progression in the future.
  7. In terms of working environment, 67% said they worked from their home office, and 49% said they worked from their dining room table or their sofa. Approximately 42% had worked from their bedroom, and 15% had worked from a closet.
  8. Workers do not want to be monitored at home with nearly 32% saying they would be unhappy but stay with the company, and 11% said they would quit if this were implemented.
  9. On average, working remotely saves about 40 minutes a day on the commute.
  10. On average, employees said they were saving about $479 per month, which is almost $6,000 per year, working from home.

Key Takeaway: COVID-19 has opened the eyes of many workers as to what working could be, and they are beginning to see this as an attractive option when considering who to work for and how long they will stay.

As workers demand these options more in the future, companies who are not in favor of working remotely will need to rethink their strategies for attracting and retaining employees.

Both the companies and employees save money with remote work, and improvements in technology make this possible for an increasing number of companies. It is expected that working from home will continue to become an increasingly popular way of life for businesses and workers in the future.

The pandemic caused a rapid shift in the workforce almost overnight, and now, companies and employees have had well over a year to work out the challenges.

The question is whether once the pandemic is declared over if all of the workers will be ordered back to the office or if companies will see a benefit to allowing people to work from home.

This has been the topic of many research studies recently. Let’s see what the data seems to indicate.

What is the future of remote working?

Working from home has its advantages, and it has its challenges. In a Chinese study, workers were found to be more productive when working from, but the study also found that working from home is not a perfect world or a perfect solution.

The study found that working from home caused a greater blurring of the line between work life and home life.

Working from home can be difficult when you have children and dogs barking in the background. Even though more workers found themselves working from home, they were only in certain sectors.

This study Chinese concluded that nearly 60% of all jobs cannot be done from home. This means that only a small portion of the workforce even has the option of continuing to work from home.

One factor that might have influenced these findings is cultural differences in views about work and home life.

The study involved phone bank workers, which could be more difficult with others in the home. The results of this study might not hold for those in other countries or occupations.

The question of whether working from home is here to stay depends on how you define it.

Of the jobs that can be done from home and the workers who are currently filling them, it is expected that many will be allowed to continue to work from home on a part-time basis, but they will be required to go into the office for certain days of the week.

The future of working from home is not black and white, and many companies are offering a hybrid of office work and working from home.

Is remote work going away, and will it continue in 2022?

In the short term, at least into 2022, many companies are extending working from home. Google is one of them. Other companies, including Lyft and Asana, are also pushing their return to the office dates back to 2022.

Other companies said they plan to transition to a hybrid arrangement where workers will spend part of the time in the office and part of the time working from home.

There were no hard statistics available as to how many companies plan to push back the date of office return, allow part-time work from home, or forgo the office altogether and form a permanent remote workforce.

It is expected that many companies are waiting to see what COVID trends do in the next several months before making the decision.

It is also expected that many companies will take the lead of larger companies like Google to make their decisions. For the short term, it looks like the trend of working from home is here to stay, at least until next year.

How much has remote work increased in 2020?

The pandemic caused the biggest work-from-home experiment in history on a global basis.

Before the pandemic hit, approximately 7% of the U.S. workforce worked from home. Regional variations in these numbers exist and can range between 6-11% depending on the part of the country.

One thing to note is that the United States lags other parts of the world when it comes to remote workers.

For instance, 18% of Swedes, 21% of Dutch, and 23% of Danes work from home, which is nearly 2-3 times those in the United States.

The pandemic has shifted the number of workers in the U.S. who are working from home, but this number is still comparatively small from a global perspective.

What companies are staying remote?

Not all companies want to call workers back into the office. Some have announced that they are closing their office doors permanently and will only be using remote workers from now on.

It is not known how many companies will ultimately choose this option, but over 100 companies in the United States have announced that they will only hire remote workers from now on. Some of these companies include:

  • GoDaddy
  • Shopify
  • Spotify
  • Upwork
  • InVision
  • Stripe
  • Twitch
  • Oyster
  • GitHub


These are some of the biggest and well-known companies that have made this announcement. There are probably many small to medium size organizations that will make this switch, too.

The bottom line is that if you want to work for a large company and you want to work from home, you have many more opportunities now than in the past. This number continues to grow as many companies see the advantages and cost savings of this option.

10 Important Remote Workplace Trends

  1. The option to work from home makes a business more attractive to employees, which might help business attract top talent.
  2. In a 2020 study, half the workers said they would not return to a job that did not offer the ability to work from home.
  3. As of 2020, people were using video conferencing 50% more than before COVID-19.
  4. In 2020, 79% of the people thought that video conferencing was as productive or more productive than in-person meetings.
  5. Remote workers worked an average of 26 more hours per month during the pandemic, which amounts to one extra day per week.
  6. In a 2020 survey, 43% of the respondents were afraid that working from home would affect their career progression in the future.
  7. In terms of working environment, 67% said they worked from their home office, and 49% said they worked from their dining room table or their sofa. Approximately 42% had worked from their bedroom, and 15% had worked from a closet.
  8. Workers do not want to be monitored at home with nearly 32% saying they would be unhappy but stay with the company, and 11% said they would quit if this were implemented.
  9. On average, working remotely saves about 40 minutes a day on the commute.
  10. On average, employees said they were saving about $479 per month, which is almost $6,000 per year, working from home.

Key Takeaway: COVID-19 has opened the eyes of many workers as to what working could be, and they are beginning to see this as an attractive option when considering who to work for and how long they will stay.

As workers demand these options more in the future, companies who are not in favor of working remotely will need to rethink their strategies for attracting and retaining employees.

Both the companies and employees save money with remote work, and improvements in technology make this possible for an increasing number of companies. It is expected that working from home will continue to become an increasingly popular way of life for businesses and workers in the future.

The pandemic caused a rapid shift in the workforce almost overnight, and now, companies and employees have had well over a year to work out the challenges.

The question is whether once the pandemic is declared over if all of the workers will be ordered back to the office or if companies will see a benefit to allowing people to work from home.

This has been the topic of many research studies recently. Let’s see what the data seems to indicate.

What is the future of remote working?

Working from home has its advantages, and it has its challenges. In a Chinese study, workers were found to be more productive when working from, but the study also found that working from home is not a perfect world or a perfect solution.

The study found that working from home caused a greater blurring of the line between work life and home life.

Working from home can be difficult when you have children and dogs barking in the background. Even though more workers found themselves working from home, they were only in certain sectors.

This study Chinese concluded that nearly 60% of all jobs cannot be done from home. This means that only a small portion of the workforce even has the option of continuing to work from home.

One factor that might have influenced these findings is cultural differences in views about work and home life.

The study involved phone bank workers, which could be more difficult with others in the home. The results of this study might not hold for those in other countries or occupations.

The question of whether working from home is here to stay depends on how you define it.

Of the jobs that can be done from home and the workers who are currently filling them, it is expected that many will be allowed to continue to work from home on a part-time basis, but they will be required to go into the office for certain days of the week.

The future of working from home is not black and white, and many companies are offering a hybrid of office work and working from home.

Is remote work going away, and will it continue in 2022?

In the short term, at least into 2022, many companies are extending working from home. Google is one of them. Other companies, including Lyft and Asana, are also pushing their return to the office dates back to 2022.

Other companies said they plan to transition to a hybrid arrangement where workers will spend part of the time in the office and part of the time working from home.

There were no hard statistics available as to how many companies plan to push back the date of office return, allow part-time work from home, or forgo the office altogether and form a permanent remote workforce.

It is expected that many companies are waiting to see what COVID trends do in the next several months before making the decision.

It is also expected that many companies will take the lead of larger companies like Google to make their decisions. For the short term, it looks like the trend of working from home is here to stay, at least until next year.

How much has remote work increased in 2020?

The pandemic caused the biggest work-from-home experiment in history on a global basis.

Before the pandemic hit, approximately 7% of the U.S. workforce worked from home. Regional variations in these numbers exist and can range between 6-11% depending on the part of the country.

One thing to note is that the United States lags other parts of the world when it comes to remote workers.

For instance, 18% of Swedes, 21% of Dutch, and 23% of Danes work from home, which is nearly 2-3 times those in the United States.

The pandemic has shifted the number of workers in the U.S. who are working from home, but this number is still comparatively small from a global perspective.

What companies are staying remote?

Not all companies want to call workers back into the office. Some have announced that they are closing their office doors permanently and will only be using remote workers from now on.

It is not known how many companies will ultimately choose this option, but over 100 companies in the United States have announced that they will only hire remote workers from now on. Some of these companies include:

  • GoDaddy
  • Shopify
  • Spotify
  • Upwork
  • InVision
  • Stripe
  • Twitch
  • Oyster
  • GitHub


These are some of the biggest and well-known companies that have made this announcement. There are probably many small to medium size organizations that will make this switch, too.

The bottom line is that if you want to work for a large company and you want to work from home, you have many more opportunities now than in the past. This number continues to grow as many companies see the advantages and cost savings of this option.

10 Important Remote Workplace Trends

  1. The option to work from home makes a business more attractive to employees, which might help business attract top talent.
  2. In a 2020 study, half the workers said they would not return to a job that did not offer the ability to work from home.
  3. As of 2020, people were using video conferencing 50% more than before COVID-19.
  4. In 2020, 79% of the people thought that video conferencing was as productive or more productive than in-person meetings.
  5. Remote workers worked an average of 26 more hours per month during the pandemic, which amounts to one extra day per week.
  6. In a 2020 survey, 43% of the respondents were afraid that working from home would affect their career progression in the future.
  7. In terms of working environment, 67% said they worked from their home office, and 49% said they worked from their dining room table or their sofa. Approximately 42% had worked from their bedroom, and 15% had worked from a closet.
  8. Workers do not want to be monitored at home with nearly 32% saying they would be unhappy but stay with the company, and 11% said they would quit if this were implemented.
  9. On average, working remotely saves about 40 minutes a day on the commute.
  10. On average, employees said they were saving about $479 per month, which is almost $6,000 per year, working from home.

Key Takeaway: COVID-19 has opened the eyes of many workers as to what working could be, and they are beginning to see this as an attractive option when considering who to work for and how long they will stay.

As workers demand these options more in the future, companies who are not in favor of working remotely will need to rethink their strategies for attracting and retaining employees.

Both the companies and employees save money with remote work, and improvements in technology make this possible for an increasing number of companies. It is expected that working from home will continue to become an increasingly popular way of life for businesses and workers in the future.

The pandemic caused a rapid shift in the workforce almost overnight, and now, companies and employees have had well over a year to work out the challenges.

The question is whether once the pandemic is declared over if all of the workers will be ordered back to the office or if companies will see a benefit to allowing people to work from home.

This has been the topic of many research studies recently. Let’s see what the data seems to indicate.

What is the future of remote working?

Working from home has its advantages, and it has its challenges. In a Chinese study, workers were found to be more productive when working from, but the study also found that working from home is not a perfect world or a perfect solution.

The study found that working from home caused a greater blurring of the line between work life and home life.

Working from home can be difficult when you have children and dogs barking in the background. Even though more workers found themselves working from home, they were only in certain sectors.

This study Chinese concluded that nearly 60% of all jobs cannot be done from home. This means that only a small portion of the workforce even has the option of continuing to work from home.

One factor that might have influenced these findings is cultural differences in views about work and home life.

The study involved phone bank workers, which could be more difficult with others in the home. The results of this study might not hold for those in other countries or occupations.

The question of whether working from home is here to stay depends on how you define it.

Of the jobs that can be done from home and the workers who are currently filling them, it is expected that many will be allowed to continue to work from home on a part-time basis, but they will be required to go into the office for certain days of the week.

The future of working from home is not black and white, and many companies are offering a hybrid of office work and working from home.

Is remote work going away, and will it continue in 2022?

In the short term, at least into 2022, many companies are extending working from home. Google is one of them. Other companies, including Lyft and Asana, are also pushing their return to the office dates back to 2022.

Other companies said they plan to transition to a hybrid arrangement where workers will spend part of the time in the office and part of the time working from home.

There were no hard statistics available as to how many companies plan to push back the date of office return, allow part-time work from home, or forgo the office altogether and form a permanent remote workforce.

It is expected that many companies are waiting to see what COVID trends do in the next several months before making the decision.

It is also expected that many companies will take the lead of larger companies like Google to make their decisions. For the short term, it looks like the trend of working from home is here to stay, at least until next year.

How much has remote work increased in 2020?

The pandemic caused the biggest work-from-home experiment in history on a global basis.

Before the pandemic hit, approximately 7% of the U.S. workforce worked from home. Regional variations in these numbers exist and can range between 6-11% depending on the part of the country.

One thing to note is that the United States lags other parts of the world when it comes to remote workers.

For instance, 18% of Swedes, 21% of Dutch, and 23% of Danes work from home, which is nearly 2-3 times those in the United States.

The pandemic has shifted the number of workers in the U.S. who are working from home, but this number is still comparatively small from a global perspective.

What companies are staying remote?

Not all companies want to call workers back into the office. Some have announced that they are closing their office doors permanently and will only be using remote workers from now on.

It is not known how many companies will ultimately choose this option, but over 100 companies in the United States have announced that they will only hire remote workers from now on. Some of these companies include:

  • GoDaddy
  • Shopify
  • Spotify
  • Upwork
  • InVision
  • Stripe
  • Twitch
  • Oyster
  • GitHub


These are some of the biggest and well-known companies that have made this announcement. There are probably many small to medium size organizations that will make this switch, too.

The bottom line is that if you want to work for a large company and you want to work from home, you have many more opportunities now than in the past. This number continues to grow as many companies see the advantages and cost savings of this option.

10 Important Remote Workplace Trends

  1. The option to work from home makes a business more attractive to employees, which might help business attract top talent.
  2. In a 2020 study, half the workers said they would not return to a job that did not offer the ability to work from home.
  3. As of 2020, people were using video conferencing 50% more than before COVID-19.
  4. In 2020, 79% of the people thought that video conferencing was as productive or more productive than in-person meetings.
  5. Remote workers worked an average of 26 more hours per month during the pandemic, which amounts to one extra day per week.
  6. In a 2020 survey, 43% of the respondents were afraid that working from home would affect their career progression in the future.
  7. In terms of working environment, 67% said they worked from their home office, and 49% said they worked from their dining room table or their sofa. Approximately 42% had worked from their bedroom, and 15% had worked from a closet.
  8. Workers do not want to be monitored at home with nearly 32% saying they would be unhappy but stay with the company, and 11% said they would quit if this were implemented.
  9. On average, working remotely saves about 40 minutes a day on the commute.
  10. On average, employees said they were saving about $479 per month, which is almost $6,000 per year, working from home.

Key Takeaway: COVID-19 has opened the eyes of many workers as to what working could be, and they are beginning to see this as an attractive option when considering who to work for and how long they will stay.

As workers demand these options more in the future, companies who are not in favor of working remotely will need to rethink their strategies for attracting and retaining employees.

Both the companies and employees save money with remote work, and improvements in technology make this possible for an increasing number of companies. It is expected that working from home will continue to become an increasingly popular way of life for businesses and workers in the future.

The pandemic caused a rapid shift in the workforce almost overnight, and now, companies and employees have had well over a year to work out the challenges.

The question is whether once the pandemic is declared over if all of the workers will be ordered back to the office or if companies will see a benefit to allowing people to work from home.

This has been the topic of many research studies recently. Let’s see what the data seems to indicate.

What is the future of remote working?

Working from home has its advantages, and it has its challenges. In a Chinese study, workers were found to be more productive when working from, but the study also found that working from home is not a perfect world or a perfect solution.

The study found that working from home caused a greater blurring of the line between work life and home life.

Working from home can be difficult when you have children and dogs barking in the background. Even though more workers found themselves working from home, they were only in certain sectors.

This study Chinese concluded that nearly 60% of all jobs cannot be done from home. This means that only a small portion of the workforce even has the option of continuing to work from home.

One factor that might have influenced these findings is cultural differences in views about work and home life.

The study involved phone bank workers, which could be more difficult with others in the home. The results of this study might not hold for those in other countries or occupations.

The question of whether working from home is here to stay depends on how you define it.

Of the jobs that can be done from home and the workers who are currently filling them, it is expected that many will be allowed to continue to work from home on a part-time basis, but they will be required to go into the office for certain days of the week.

The future of working from home is not black and white, and many companies are offering a hybrid of office work and working from home.

Is remote work going away, and will it continue in 2022?

In the short term, at least into 2022, many companies are extending working from home. Google is one of them. Other companies, including Lyft and Asana, are also pushing their return to the office dates back to 2022.

Other companies said they plan to transition to a hybrid arrangement where workers will spend part of the time in the office and part of the time working from home.

There were no hard statistics available as to how many companies plan to push back the date of office return, allow part-time work from home, or forgo the office altogether and form a permanent remote workforce.

It is expected that many companies are waiting to see what COVID trends do in the next several months before making the decision.

It is also expected that many companies will take the lead of larger companies like Google to make their decisions. For the short term, it looks like the trend of working from home is here to stay, at least until next year.

How much has remote work increased in 2020?

The pandemic caused the biggest work-from-home experiment in history on a global basis.

Before the pandemic hit, approximately 7% of the U.S. workforce worked from home. Regional variations in these numbers exist and can range between 6-11% depending on the part of the country.

One thing to note is that the United States lags other parts of the world when it comes to remote workers.

For instance, 18% of Swedes, 21% of Dutch, and 23% of Danes work from home, which is nearly 2-3 times those in the United States.

The pandemic has shifted the number of workers in the U.S. who are working from home, but this number is still comparatively small from a global perspective.

What companies are staying remote?

Not all companies want to call workers back into the office. Some have announced that they are closing their office doors permanently and will only be using remote workers from now on.

It is not known how many companies will ultimately choose this option, but over 100 companies in the United States have announced that they will only hire remote workers from now on. Some of these companies include:

  • GoDaddy
  • Shopify
  • Spotify
  • Upwork
  • InVision
  • Stripe
  • Twitch
  • Oyster
  • GitHub


These are some of the biggest and well-known companies that have made this announcement. There are probably many small to medium size organizations that will make this switch, too.

The bottom line is that if you want to work for a large company and you want to work from home, you have many more opportunities now than in the past. This number continues to grow as many companies see the advantages and cost savings of this option.

10 Important Remote Workplace Trends

  1. The option to work from home makes a business more attractive to employees, which might help business attract top talent.
  2. In a 2020 study, half the workers said they would not return to a job that did not offer the ability to work from home.
  3. As of 2020, people were using video conferencing 50% more than before COVID-19.
  4. In 2020, 79% of the people thought that video conferencing was as productive or more productive than in-person meetings.
  5. Remote workers worked an average of 26 more hours per month during the pandemic, which amounts to one extra day per week.
  6. In a 2020 survey, 43% of the respondents were afraid that working from home would affect their career progression in the future.
  7. In terms of working environment, 67% said they worked from their home office, and 49% said they worked from their dining room table or their sofa. Approximately 42% had worked from their bedroom, and 15% had worked from a closet.
  8. Workers do not want to be monitored at home with nearly 32% saying they would be unhappy but stay with the company, and 11% said they would quit if this were implemented.
  9. On average, working remotely saves about 40 minutes a day on the commute.
  10. On average, employees said they were saving about $479 per month, which is almost $6,000 per year, working from home.

Key Takeaway: COVID-19 has opened the eyes of many workers as to what working could be, and they are beginning to see this as an attractive option when considering who to work for and how long they will stay.

As workers demand these options more in the future, companies who are not in favor of working remotely will need to rethink their strategies for attracting and retaining employees.

Both the companies and employees save money with remote work, and improvements in technology make this possible for an increasing number of companies. It is expected that working from home will continue to become an increasingly popular way of life for businesses and workers in the future.

The pandemic caused a rapid shift in the workforce almost overnight, and now, companies and employees have had well over a year to work out the challenges.

The question is whether once the pandemic is declared over if all of the workers will be ordered back to the office or if companies will see a benefit to allowing people to work from home.

This has been the topic of many research studies recently. Let’s see what the data seems to indicate.

What is the future of remote working?

Working from home has its advantages, and it has its challenges. In a Chinese study, workers were found to be more productive when working from, but the study also found that working from home is not a perfect world or a perfect solution.

The study found that working from home caused a greater blurring of the line between work life and home life.

Working from home can be difficult when you have children and dogs barking in the background. Even though more workers found themselves working from home, they were only in certain sectors.

This study Chinese concluded that nearly 60% of all jobs cannot be done from home. This means that only a small portion of the workforce even has the option of continuing to work from home.

One factor that might have influenced these findings is cultural differences in views about work and home life.

The study involved phone bank workers, which could be more difficult with others in the home. The results of this study might not hold for those in other countries or occupations.

The question of whether working from home is here to stay depends on how you define it.

Of the jobs that can be done from home and the workers who are currently filling them, it is expected that many will be allowed to continue to work from home on a part-time basis, but they will be required to go into the office for certain days of the week.

The future of working from home is not black and white, and many companies are offering a hybrid of office work and working from home.

Is remote work going away, and will it continue in 2022?

In the short term, at least into 2022, many companies are extending working from home. Google is one of them. Other companies, including Lyft and Asana, are also pushing their return to the office dates back to 2022.

Other companies said they plan to transition to a hybrid arrangement where workers will spend part of the time in the office and part of the time working from home.

There were no hard statistics available as to how many companies plan to push back the date of office return, allow part-time work from home, or forgo the office altogether and form a permanent remote workforce.

It is expected that many companies are waiting to see what COVID trends do in the next several months before making the decision.

It is also expected that many companies will take the lead of larger companies like Google to make their decisions. For the short term, it looks like the trend of working from home is here to stay, at least until next year.

How much has remote work increased in 2020?

The pandemic caused the biggest work-from-home experiment in history on a global basis.

Before the pandemic hit, approximately 7% of the U.S. workforce worked from home. Regional variations in these numbers exist and can range between 6-11% depending on the part of the country.

One thing to note is that the United States lags other parts of the world when it comes to remote workers.

For instance, 18% of Swedes, 21% of Dutch, and 23% of Danes work from home, which is nearly 2-3 times those in the United States.

The pandemic has shifted the number of workers in the U.S. who are working from home, but this number is still comparatively small from a global perspective.

What companies are staying remote?

Not all companies want to call workers back into the office. Some have announced that they are closing their office doors permanently and will only be using remote workers from now on.

It is not known how many companies will ultimately choose this option, but over 100 companies in the United States have announced that they will only hire remote workers from now on. Some of these companies include:

  • GoDaddy
  • Shopify
  • Spotify
  • Upwork
  • InVision
  • Stripe
  • Twitch
  • Oyster
  • GitHub


These are some of the biggest and well-known companies that have made this announcement. There are probably many small to medium size organizations that will make this switch, too.

The bottom line is that if you want to work for a large company and you want to work from home, you have many more opportunities now than in the past. This number continues to grow as many companies see the advantages and cost savings of this option.

10 Important Remote Workplace Trends

  1. The option to work from home makes a business more attractive to employees, which might help business attract top talent.
  2. In a 2020 study, half the workers said they would not return to a job that did not offer the ability to work from home.
  3. As of 2020, people were using video conferencing 50% more than before COVID-19.
  4. In 2020, 79% of the people thought that video conferencing was as productive or more productive than in-person meetings.
  5. Remote workers worked an average of 26 more hours per month during the pandemic, which amounts to one extra day per week.
  6. In a 2020 survey, 43% of the respondents were afraid that working from home would affect their career progression in the future.
  7. In terms of working environment, 67% said they worked from their home office, and 49% said they worked from their dining room table or their sofa. Approximately 42% had worked from their bedroom, and 15% had worked from a closet.
  8. Workers do not want to be monitored at home with nearly 32% saying they would be unhappy but stay with the company, and 11% said they would quit if this were implemented.
  9. On average, working remotely saves about 40 minutes a day on the commute.
  10. On average, employees said they were saving about $479 per month, which is almost $6,000 per year, working from home.

Key Takeaway: COVID-19 has opened the eyes of many workers as to what working could be, and they are beginning to see this as an attractive option when considering who to work for and how long they will stay.

As workers demand these options more in the future, companies who are not in favor of working remotely will need to rethink their strategies for attracting and retaining employees.

Both the companies and employees save money with remote work, and improvements in technology make this possible for an increasing number of companies. It is expected that working from home will continue to become an increasingly popular way of life for businesses and workers in the future.

The pandemic caused a rapid shift in the workforce almost overnight, and now, companies and employees have had well over a year to work out the challenges.

The question is whether once the pandemic is declared over if all of the workers will be ordered back to the office or if companies will see a benefit to allowing people to work from home.

This has been the topic of many research studies recently. Let’s see what the data seems to indicate.

What is the future of remote working?

Working from home has its advantages, and it has its challenges. In a Chinese study, workers were found to be more productive when working from, but the study also found that working from home is not a perfect world or a perfect solution.

The study found that working from home caused a greater blurring of the line between work life and home life.

Working from home can be difficult when you have children and dogs barking in the background. Even though more workers found themselves working from home, they were only in certain sectors.

This study Chinese concluded that nearly 60% of all jobs cannot be done from home. This means that only a small portion of the workforce even has the option of continuing to work from home.

One factor that might have influenced these findings is cultural differences in views about work and home life.

The study involved phone bank workers, which could be more difficult with others in the home. The results of this study might not hold for those in other countries or occupations.

The question of whether working from home is here to stay depends on how you define it.

Of the jobs that can be done from home and the workers who are currently filling them, it is expected that many will be allowed to continue to work from home on a part-time basis, but they will be required to go into the office for certain days of the week.

The future of working from home is not black and white, and many companies are offering a hybrid of office work and working from home.

Is remote work going away, and will it continue in 2022?

In the short term, at least into 2022, many companies are extending working from home. Google is one of them. Other companies, including Lyft and Asana, are also pushing their return to the office dates back to 2022.

Other companies said they plan to transition to a hybrid arrangement where workers will spend part of the time in the office and part of the time working from home.

There were no hard statistics available as to how many companies plan to push back the date of office return, allow part-time work from home, or forgo the office altogether and form a permanent remote workforce.

It is expected that many companies are waiting to see what COVID trends do in the next several months before making the decision.

It is also expected that many companies will take the lead of larger companies like Google to make their decisions. For the short term, it looks like the trend of working from home is here to stay, at least until next year.

How much has remote work increased in 2020?

The pandemic caused the biggest work-from-home experiment in history on a global basis.

Before the pandemic hit, approximately 7% of the U.S. workforce worked from home. Regional variations in these numbers exist and can range between 6-11% depending on the part of the country.

One thing to note is that the United States lags other parts of the world when it comes to remote workers.

For instance, 18% of Swedes, 21% of Dutch, and 23% of Danes work from home, which is nearly 2-3 times those in the United States.

The pandemic has shifted the number of workers in the U.S. who are working from home, but this number is still comparatively small from a global perspective.

What companies are staying remote?

Not all companies want to call workers back into the office. Some have announced that they are closing their office doors permanently and will only be using remote workers from now on.

It is not known how many companies will ultimately choose this option, but over 100 companies in the United States have announced that they will only hire remote workers from now on. Some of these companies include:

  • GoDaddy
  • Shopify
  • Spotify
  • Upwork
  • InVision
  • Stripe
  • Twitch
  • Oyster
  • GitHub


These are some of the biggest and well-known companies that have made this announcement. There are probably many small to medium size organizations that will make this switch, too.

The bottom line is that if you want to work for a large company and you want to work from home, you have many more opportunities now than in the past. This number continues to grow as many companies see the advantages and cost savings of this option.

10 Important Remote Workplace Trends

  1. The option to work from home makes a business more attractive to employees, which might help business attract top talent.
  2. In a 2020 study, half the workers said they would not return to a job that did not offer the ability to work from home.
  3. As of 2020, people were using video conferencing 50% more than before COVID-19.
  4. In 2020, 79% of the people thought that video conferencing was as productive or more productive than in-person meetings.
  5. Remote workers worked an average of 26 more hours per month during the pandemic, which amounts to one extra day per week.
  6. In a 2020 survey, 43% of the respondents were afraid that working from home would affect their career progression in the future.
  7. In terms of working environment, 67% said they worked from their home office, and 49% said they worked from their dining room table or their sofa. Approximately 42% had worked from their bedroom, and 15% had worked from a closet.
  8. Workers do not want to be monitored at home with nearly 32% saying they would be unhappy but stay with the company, and 11% said they would quit if this were implemented.
  9. On average, working remotely saves about 40 minutes a day on the commute.
  10. On average, employees said they were saving about $479 per month, which is almost $6,000 per year, working from home.

Key Takeaway: COVID-19 has opened the eyes of many workers as to what working could be, and they are beginning to see this as an attractive option when considering who to work for and how long they will stay.

As workers demand these options more in the future, companies who are not in favor of working remotely will need to rethink their strategies for attracting and retaining employees.

Both the companies and employees save money with remote work, and improvements in technology make this possible for an increasing number of companies. It is expected that working from home will continue to become an increasingly popular way of life for businesses and workers in the future.

The pandemic caused a rapid shift in the workforce almost overnight, and now, companies and employees have had well over a year to work out the challenges.

The question is whether once the pandemic is declared over if all of the workers will be ordered back to the office or if companies will see a benefit to allowing people to work from home.

This has been the topic of many research studies recently. Let’s see what the data seems to indicate.

What is the future of remote working?

Working from home has its advantages, and it has its challenges. In a Chinese study, workers were found to be more productive when working from, but the study also found that working from home is not a perfect world or a perfect solution.

The study found that working from home caused a greater blurring of the line between work life and home life.

Working from home can be difficult when you have children and dogs barking in the background. Even though more workers found themselves working from home, they were only in certain sectors.

This study Chinese concluded that nearly 60% of all jobs cannot be done from home. This means that only a small portion of the workforce even has the option of continuing to work from home.

One factor that might have influenced these findings is cultural differences in views about work and home life.

The study involved phone bank workers, which could be more difficult with others in the home. The results of this study might not hold for those in other countries or occupations.

The question of whether working from home is here to stay depends on how you define it.

Of the jobs that can be done from home and the workers who are currently filling them, it is expected that many will be allowed to continue to work from home on a part-time basis, but they will be required to go into the office for certain days of the week.

The future of working from home is not black and white, and many companies are offering a hybrid of office work and working from home.

Is remote work going away, and will it continue in 2022?

In the short term, at least into 2022, many companies are extending working from home. Google is one of them. Other companies, including Lyft and Asana, are also pushing their return to the office dates back to 2022.

Other companies said they plan to transition to a hybrid arrangement where workers will spend part of the time in the office and part of the time working from home.

There were no hard statistics available as to how many companies plan to push back the date of office return, allow part-time work from home, or forgo the office altogether and form a permanent remote workforce.

It is expected that many companies are waiting to see what COVID trends do in the next several months before making the decision.

It is also expected that many companies will take the lead of larger companies like Google to make their decisions. For the short term, it looks like the trend of working from home is here to stay, at least until next year.

How much has remote work increased in 2020?

The pandemic caused the biggest work-from-home experiment in history on a global basis.

Before the pandemic hit, approximately 7% of the U.S. workforce worked from home. Regional variations in these numbers exist and can range between 6-11% depending on the part of the country.

One thing to note is that the United States lags other parts of the world when it comes to remote workers.

For instance, 18% of Swedes, 21% of Dutch, and 23% of Danes work from home, which is nearly 2-3 times those in the United States.

The pandemic has shifted the number of workers in the U.S. who are working from home, but this number is still comparatively small from a global perspective.

What companies are staying remote?

Not all companies want to call workers back into the office. Some have announced that they are closing their office doors permanently and will only be using remote workers from now on.

It is not known how many companies will ultimately choose this option, but over 100 companies in the United States have announced that they will only hire remote workers from now on. Some of these companies include:

  • GoDaddy
  • Shopify
  • Spotify
  • Upwork
  • InVision
  • Stripe
  • Twitch
  • Oyster
  • GitHub


These are some of the biggest and well-known companies that have made this announcement. There are probably many small to medium size organizations that will make this switch, too.

The bottom line is that if you want to work for a large company and you want to work from home, you have many more opportunities now than in the past. This number continues to grow as many companies see the advantages and cost savings of this option.

10 Important Remote Workplace Trends

  1. The option to work from home makes a business more attractive to employees, which might help business attract top talent.
  2. In a 2020 study, half the workers said they would not return to a job that did not offer the ability to work from home.
  3. As of 2020, people were using video conferencing 50% more than before COVID-19.
  4. In 2020, 79% of the people thought that video conferencing was as productive or more productive than in-person meetings.
  5. Remote workers worked an average of 26 more hours per month during the pandemic, which amounts to one extra day per week.
  6. In a 2020 survey, 43% of the respondents were afraid that working from home would affect their career progression in the future.
  7. In terms of working environment, 67% said they worked from their home office, and 49% said they worked from their dining room table or their sofa. Approximately 42% had worked from their bedroom, and 15% had worked from a closet.
  8. Workers do not want to be monitored at home with nearly 32% saying they would be unhappy but stay with the company, and 11% said they would quit if this were implemented.
  9. On average, working remotely saves about 40 minutes a day on the commute.
  10. On average, employees said they were saving about $479 per month, which is almost $6,000 per year, working from home.

Key Takeaway: COVID-19 has opened the eyes of many workers as to what working could be, and they are beginning to see this as an attractive option when considering who to work for and how long they will stay.

As workers demand these options more in the future, companies who are not in favor of working remotely will need to rethink their strategies for attracting and retaining employees.

Both the companies and employees save money with remote work, and improvements in technology make this possible for an increasing number of companies. It is expected that working from home will continue to become an increasingly popular way of life for businesses and workers in the future.

The pandemic caused a rapid shift in the workforce almost overnight, and now, companies and employees have had well over a year to work out the challenges.

The question is whether once the pandemic is declared over if all of the workers will be ordered back to the office or if companies will see a benefit to allowing people to work from home.

This has been the topic of many research studies recently. Let’s see what the data seems to indicate.

What is the future of remote working?

Working from home has its advantages, and it has its challenges. In a Chinese study, workers were found to be more productive when working from, but the study also found that working from home is not a perfect world or a perfect solution.

The study found that working from home caused a greater blurring of the line between work life and home life.

Working from home can be difficult when you have children and dogs barking in the background. Even though more workers found themselves working from home, they were only in certain sectors.

This study Chinese concluded that nearly 60% of all jobs cannot be done from home. This means that only a small portion of the workforce even has the option of continuing to work from home.

One factor that might have influenced these findings is cultural differences in views about work and home life.

The study involved phone bank workers, which could be more difficult with others in the home. The results of this study might not hold for those in other countries or occupations.

The question of whether working from home is here to stay depends on how you define it.

Of the jobs that can be done from home and the workers who are currently filling them, it is expected that many will be allowed to continue to work from home on a part-time basis, but they will be required to go into the office for certain days of the week.

The future of working from home is not black and white, and many companies are offering a hybrid of office work and working from home.

Is remote work going away, and will it continue in 2022?

In the short term, at least into 2022, many companies are extending working from home. Google is one of them. Other companies, including Lyft and Asana, are also pushing their return to the office dates back to 2022.

Other companies said they plan to transition to a hybrid arrangement where workers will spend part of the time in the office and part of the time working from home.

There were no hard statistics available as to how many companies plan to push back the date of office return, allow part-time work from home, or forgo the office altogether and form a permanent remote workforce.

It is expected that many companies are waiting to see what COVID trends do in the next several months before making the decision.

It is also expected that many companies will take the lead of larger companies like Google to make their decisions. For the short term, it looks like the trend of working from home is here to stay, at least until next year.

How much has remote work increased in 2020?

The pandemic caused the biggest work-from-home experiment in history on a global basis.

Before the pandemic hit, approximately 7% of the U.S. workforce worked from home. Regional variations in these numbers exist and can range between 6-11% depending on the part of the country.

One thing to note is that the United States lags other parts of the world when it comes to remote workers.

For instance, 18% of Swedes, 21% of Dutch, and 23% of Danes work from home, which is nearly 2-3 times those in the United States.

The pandemic has shifted the number of workers in the U.S. who are working from home, but this number is still comparatively small from a global perspective.

What companies are staying remote?

Not all companies want to call workers back into the office. Some have announced that they are closing their office doors permanently and will only be using remote workers from now on.

It is not known how many companies will ultimately choose this option, but over 100 companies in the United States have announced that they will only hire remote workers from now on. Some of these companies include:

  • GoDaddy
  • Shopify
  • Spotify
  • Upwork
  • InVision
  • Stripe
  • Twitch
  • Oyster
  • GitHub


These are some of the biggest and well-known companies that have made this announcement. There are probably many small to medium size organizations that will make this switch, too.

The bottom line is that if you want to work for a large company and you want to work from home, you have many more opportunities now than in the past. This number continues to grow as many companies see the advantages and cost savings of this option.

10 Important Remote Workplace Trends

  1. The option to work from home makes a business more attractive to employees, which might help business attract top talent.
  2. In a 2020 study, half the workers said they would not return to a job that did not offer the ability to work from home.
  3. As of 2020, people were using video conferencing 50% more than before COVID-19.
  4. In 2020, 79% of the people thought that video conferencing was as productive or more productive than in-person meetings.
  5. Remote workers worked an average of 26 more hours per month during the pandemic, which amounts to one extra day per week.
  6. In a 2020 survey, 43% of the respondents were afraid that working from home would affect their career progression in the future.
  7. In terms of working environment, 67% said they worked from their home office, and 49% said they worked from their dining room table or their sofa. Approximately 42% had worked from their bedroom, and 15% had worked from a closet.
  8. Workers do not want to be monitored at home with nearly 32% saying they would be unhappy but stay with the company, and 11% said they would quit if this were implemented.
  9. On average, working remotely saves about 40 minutes a day on the commute.
  10. On average, employees said they were saving about $479 per month, which is almost $6,000 per year, working from home.

Key Takeaway: COVID-19 has opened the eyes of many workers as to what working could be, and they are beginning to see this as an attractive option when considering who to work for and how long they will stay.

As workers demand these options more in the future, companies who are not in favor of working remotely will need to rethink their strategies for attracting and retaining employees.

Both the companies and employees save money with remote work, and improvements in technology make this possible for an increasing number of companies. It is expected that working from home will continue to become an increasingly popular way of life for businesses and workers in the future.

The pandemic caused a rapid shift in the workforce almost overnight, and now, companies and employees have had well over a year to work out the challenges.

The question is whether once the pandemic is declared over if all of the workers will be ordered back to the office or if companies will see a benefit to allowing people to work from home.

This has been the topic of many research studies recently. Let’s see what the data seems to indicate.

What is the future of remote working?

Working from home has its advantages, and it has its challenges. In a Chinese study, workers were found to be more productive when working from, but the study also found that working from home is not a perfect world or a perfect solution.

The study found that working from home caused a greater blurring of the line between work life and home life.

Working from home can be difficult when you have children and dogs barking in the background. Even though more workers found themselves working from home, they were only in certain sectors.

This study Chinese concluded that nearly 60% of all jobs cannot be done from home. This means that only a small portion of the workforce even has the option of continuing to work from home.

One factor that might have influenced these findings is cultural differences in views about work and home life.

The study involved phone bank workers, which could be more difficult with others in the home. The results of this study might not hold for those in other countries or occupations.

The question of whether working from home is here to stay depends on how you define it.

Of the jobs that can be done from home and the workers who are currently filling them, it is expected that many will be allowed to continue to work from home on a part-time basis, but they will be required to go into the office for certain days of the week.

The future of working from home is not black and white, and many companies are offering a hybrid of office work and working from home.

Is remote work going away, and will it continue in 2022?

In the short term, at least into 2022, many companies are extending working from home. Google is one of them. Other companies, including Lyft and Asana, are also pushing their return to the office dates back to 2022.

Other companies said they plan to transition to a hybrid arrangement where workers will spend part of the time in the office and part of the time working from home.

There were no hard statistics available as to how many companies plan to push back the date of office return, allow part-time work from home, or forgo the office altogether and form a permanent remote workforce.

It is expected that many companies are waiting to see what COVID trends do in the next several months before making the decision.

It is also expected that many companies will take the lead of larger companies like Google to make their decisions. For the short term, it looks like the trend of working from home is here to stay, at least until next year.

How much has remote work increased in 2020?

The pandemic caused the biggest work-from-home experiment in history on a global basis.

Before the pandemic hit, approximately 7% of the U.S. workforce worked from home. Regional variations in these numbers exist and can range between 6-11% depending on the part of the country.

One thing to note is that the United States lags other parts of the world when it comes to remote workers.

For instance, 18% of Swedes, 21% of Dutch, and 23% of Danes work from home, which is nearly 2-3 times those in the United States.

The pandemic has shifted the number of workers in the U.S. who are working from home, but this number is still comparatively small from a global perspective.

What companies are staying remote?

Not all companies want to call workers back into the office. Some have announced that they are closing their office doors permanently and will only be using remote workers from now on.

It is not known how many companies will ultimately choose this option, but over 100 companies in the United States have announced that they will only hire remote workers from now on. Some of these companies include:

  • GoDaddy
  • Shopify
  • Spotify
  • Upwork
  • InVision
  • Stripe
  • Twitch
  • Oyster
  • GitHub


These are some of the biggest and well-known companies that have made this announcement. There are probably many small to medium size organizations that will make this switch, too.

The bottom line is that if you want to work for a large company and you want to work from home, you have many more opportunities now than in the past. This number continues to grow as many companies see the advantages and cost savings of this option.

10 Important Remote Workplace Trends

  1. The option to work from home makes a business more attractive to employees, which might help business attract top talent.
  2. In a 2020 study, half the workers said they would not return to a job that did not offer the ability to work from home.
  3. As of 2020, people were using video conferencing 50% more than before COVID-19.
  4. In 2020, 79% of the people thought that video conferencing was as productive or more productive than in-person meetings.
  5. Remote workers worked an average of 26 more hours per month during the pandemic, which amounts to one extra day per week.
  6. In a 2020 survey, 43% of the respondents were afraid that working from home would affect their career progression in the future.
  7. In terms of working environment, 67% said they worked from their home office, and 49% said they worked from their dining room table or their sofa. Approximately 42% had worked from their bedroom, and 15% had worked from a closet.
  8. Workers do not want to be monitored at home with nearly 32% saying they would be unhappy but stay with the company, and 11% said they would quit if this were implemented.
  9. On average, working remotely saves about 40 minutes a day on the commute.
  10. On average, employees said they were saving about $479 per month, which is almost $6,000 per year, working from home.

Key Takeaway: COVID-19 has opened the eyes of many workers as to what working could be, and they are beginning to see this as an attractive option when considering who to work for and how long they will stay.

As workers demand these options more in the future, companies who are not in favor of working remotely will need to rethink their strategies for attracting and retaining employees.

Both the companies and employees save money with remote work, and improvements in technology make this possible for an increasing number of companies. It is expected that working from home will continue to become an increasingly popular way of life for businesses and workers in the future.

Chapter 4

Remote Workers Happiness Statistics

Are remote workers happier than when they were working in the office? We'll answer this question and many more all about remote workers happiness.

Now, we have the company perspective on the effects of working from home. The workplace is changing and taking new forms that range from 100% remote work to a hybrid of remote and office work.

In the past, working from home was a popular fantasy that many shared, but how does working from home in your pajamas sound after over a year of doing it?

After facing the realities of working from home, are workers happy, or are they looking forward to going back to the office?

Are remote workers happier?

A growing body of research says that working from home makes people happier. Here are some of the positive effects that workers reported from working from home.

  • Decreased work-related stress
  • Better work-life balance
  • Opportunities for exercise and better diet
  • Increased focus and productivity
  • Freedom to move around and take breaks


These factors tell us why people prefer working from home, but they also tell us what people do not like about working from the office. It can also give companies clues as to how they can make working from the office more attractive in the future.

It is well-established in the field of industrial psychology that there is a positive connection between happiness and productivity.

It has also been found that real-world shocks and stress lower productivity. Happier, less stressed workers are more productive, which could account for some of the productivity increases found earlier in these statistics.

Does working from home make you happy?

A 2020 U.K. study found that 75% of the 2,000 workers surveyed said they were happier working from home.

Of them, 53% said that choosing where they work was having a positive effect on them. Other positive aspects of working from home included:

  • Setting their own schedule
  • Lack of dress code
  • More time for house chores
  • Being less distracted by coworkers.


These workers found many benefits to working from home, but loneliness and a lack of socialization took a toll on some, and this affected their willingness to return to the office. The amount of social contact in a person's life outside of life affected their experience.

What percentage of employees want to work remotely?

In researching these statistics, differences were found among the studies. It is not known if the company or work environment was to blame or if culture and location played a role. A U.K. study found that 88% of employee want to continue working remotely at least part-time.

A recent study in the U.S. found that approximately 38% would like to continue working from home. Workers also reported that they are slightly happier when working from home as compared to a year ago. The question is what conclusion can be drawn from this with such a wide gap in results.

Some smaller studies in the U.S. reported that as many as 99% of workers in the U.S. wanted to continue to work from home. These differences in opinion seem to point to the effect of errors in sampling. In other words, the answer that you get depends on who you ask.

10 Important Remote Workers Happiness Statistics

employees are willing to make sacrifices for the ability to work remotely
  1. Nearly 13% of remote workers reported that they were more likely to stay at their current job for the next five years when compared to those who worked in the office.
  2. Approximately 80% of all workers in a recent survey said that they would reject a job that does not offer the ability to work from home and flexible hours.
  3. Employees said they were willing to make some sacrifices for the ability to work remotely, such as taking on a greater workload, paying for their own technology, giving up company benefits, and taking a pay cut or demotion
  4. Improved work-life balance was the number one reason why workers chose jobs that allowed them to work remotely.
  5. Some of the top reasons, besides work-life balance, why people chose to work remotely were improved productivity, avoiding commuting, less stress, saving money, childcare responsibilities, accommodating a disability, moving home, no company office, and eldercare responsibilities.
  6. Nearly 77% of remote workers reported an improvement in their wellbeing and overall health status.
  7. A study found that 80% of remote workers said they were happy with their job compared to only 55% of those in a traditional office setting.
  8. Having a choice in working location was found to be more important than having a more prestigious role or working for a more prestigious company.
  9. A study found that 61% of all workers have left or considered leaving a job due to a lack of flexibility.
  10. Among the downsides to working at home were loneliness (19%) and the inability to “switch off” after the work is done (22%).

downsides to remote working

Key Takeaway: The bottom line is that workers place a high value on the ability to choose where they do their work. They report improved health and better happiness. We know that these factors have an impact on the competitive advantage of the company.

remote workers would reject a job offer that is not flexible

Happiness in the workplace leads to greater productivity, lower absentee rates, and a desire to stay with an employer for a longer period.

These statistics are important for companies who want to use their workforce to their greatest advantage.

remote workers are happier with their job

Now, we have the company perspective on the effects of working from home. The workplace is changing and taking new forms that range from 100% remote work to a hybrid of remote and office work.

In the past, working from home was a popular fantasy that many shared, but how does working from home in your pajamas sound after over a year of doing it?

After facing the realities of working from home, are workers happy, or are they looking forward to going back to the office?

Are remote workers happier?

A growing body of research says that working from home makes people happier. Here are some of the positive effects that workers reported from working from home.

  • Decreased work-related stress
  • Better work-life balance
  • Opportunities for exercise and better diet
  • Increased focus and productivity
  • Freedom to move around and take breaks


These factors tell us why people prefer working from home, but they also tell us what people do not like about working from the office. It can also give companies clues as to how they can make working from the office more attractive in the future.

It is well-established in the field of industrial psychology that there is a positive connection between happiness and productivity.

It has also been found that real-world shocks and stress lower productivity. Happier, less stressed workers are more productive, which could account for some of the productivity increases found earlier in these statistics.

Does working from home make you happy?

A 2020 U.K. study found that 75% of the 2,000 workers surveyed said they were happier working from home.

Of them, 53% said that choosing where they work was having a positive effect on them. Other positive aspects of working from home included:

  • Setting their own schedule
  • Lack of dress code
  • More time for house chores
  • Being less distracted by coworkers.


These workers found many benefits to working from home, but loneliness and a lack of socialization took a toll on some, and this affected their willingness to return to the office. The amount of social contact in a person's life outside of life affected their experience.

What percentage of employees want to work remotely?

In researching these statistics, differences were found among the studies. It is not known if the company or work environment was to blame or if culture and location played a role. A U.K. study found that 88% of employee want to continue working remotely at least part-time.

A recent study in the U.S. found that approximately 38% would like to continue working from home. Workers also reported that they are slightly happier when working from home as compared to a year ago. The question is what conclusion can be drawn from this with such a wide gap in results.

Some smaller studies in the U.S. reported that as many as 99% of workers in the U.S. wanted to continue to work from home. These differences in opinion seem to point to the effect of errors in sampling. In other words, the answer that you get depends on who you ask.

10 Important Remote Workers Happiness Statistics

employees are willing to make sacrifices for the ability to work remotely
  1. Nearly 13% of remote workers reported that they were more likely to stay at their current job for the next five years when compared to those who worked in the office.
  2. Approximately 80% of all workers in a recent survey said that they would reject a job that does not offer the ability to work from home and flexible hours.
  3. Employees said they were willing to make some sacrifices for the ability to work remotely, such as taking on a greater workload, paying for their own technology, giving up company benefits, and taking a pay cut or demotion
  4. Improved work-life balance was the number one reason why workers chose jobs that allowed them to work remotely.
  5. Some of the top reasons, besides work-life balance, why people chose to work remotely were improved productivity, avoiding commuting, less stress, saving money, childcare responsibilities, accommodating a disability, moving home, no company office, and eldercare responsibilities.
  6. Nearly 77% of remote workers reported an improvement in their wellbeing and overall health status.
  7. A study found that 80% of remote workers said they were happy with their job compared to only 55% of those in a traditional office setting.
  8. Having a choice in working location was found to be more important than having a more prestigious role or working for a more prestigious company.
  9. A study found that 61% of all workers have left or considered leaving a job due to a lack of flexibility.
  10. Among the downsides to working at home were loneliness (19%) and the inability to “switch off” after the work is done (22%).

downsides to remote working

Key Takeaway: The bottom line is that workers place a high value on the ability to choose where they do their work. They report improved health and better happiness. We know that these factors have an impact on the competitive advantage of the company.

remote workers would reject a job offer that is not flexible

Happiness in the workplace leads to greater productivity, lower absentee rates, and a desire to stay with an employer for a longer period.

These statistics are important for companies who want to use their workforce to their greatest advantage.

remote workers are happier with their job

Now, we have the company perspective on the effects of working from home. The workplace is changing and taking new forms that range from 100% remote work to a hybrid of remote and office work.

In the past, working from home was a popular fantasy that many shared, but how does working from home in your pajamas sound after over a year of doing it?

After facing the realities of working from home, are workers happy, or are they looking forward to going back to the office?

Are remote workers happier?

A growing body of research says that working from home makes people happier. Here are some of the positive effects that workers reported from working from home.

  • Decreased work-related stress
  • Better work-life balance
  • Opportunities for exercise and better diet
  • Increased focus and productivity
  • Freedom to move around and take breaks


These factors tell us why people prefer working from home, but they also tell us what people do not like about working from the office. It can also give companies clues as to how they can make working from the office more attractive in the future.

It is well-established in the field of industrial psychology that there is a positive connection between happiness and productivity.

It has also been found that real-world shocks and stress lower productivity. Happier, less stressed workers are more productive, which could account for some of the productivity increases found earlier in these statistics.

Does working from home make you happy?

A 2020 U.K. study found that 75% of the 2,000 workers surveyed said they were happier working from home.

Of them, 53% said that choosing where they work was having a positive effect on them. Other positive aspects of working from home included:

  • Setting their own schedule
  • Lack of dress code
  • More time for house chores
  • Being less distracted by coworkers.


These workers found many benefits to working from home, but loneliness and a lack of socialization took a toll on some, and this affected their willingness to return to the office. The amount of social contact in a person's life outside of life affected their experience.

What percentage of employees want to work remotely?

In researching these statistics, differences were found among the studies. It is not known if the company or work environment was to blame or if culture and location played a role. A U.K. study found that 88% of employee want to continue working remotely at least part-time.

A recent study in the U.S. found that approximately 38% would like to continue working from home. Workers also reported that they are slightly happier when working from home as compared to a year ago. The question is what conclusion can be drawn from this with such a wide gap in results.

Some smaller studies in the U.S. reported that as many as 99% of workers in the U.S. wanted to continue to work from home. These differences in opinion seem to point to the effect of errors in sampling. In other words, the answer that you get depends on who you ask.

10 Important Remote Workers Happiness Statistics

employees are willing to make sacrifices for the ability to work remotely
  1. Nearly 13% of remote workers reported that they were more likely to stay at their current job for the next five years when compared to those who worked in the office.
  2. Approximately 80% of all workers in a recent survey said that they would reject a job that does not offer the ability to work from home and flexible hours.
  3. Employees said they were willing to make some sacrifices for the ability to work remotely, such as taking on a greater workload, paying for their own technology, giving up company benefits, and taking a pay cut or demotion
  4. Improved work-life balance was the number one reason why workers chose jobs that allowed them to work remotely.
  5. Some of the top reasons, besides work-life balance, why people chose to work remotely were improved productivity, avoiding commuting, less stress, saving money, childcare responsibilities, accommodating a disability, moving home, no company office, and eldercare responsibilities.
  6. Nearly 77% of remote workers reported an improvement in their wellbeing and overall health status.
  7. A study found that 80% of remote workers said they were happy with their job compared to only 55% of those in a traditional office setting.
  8. Having a choice in working location was found to be more important than having a more prestigious role or working for a more prestigious company.
  9. A study found that 61% of all workers have left or considered leaving a job due to a lack of flexibility.
  10. Among the downsides to working at home were loneliness (19%) and the inability to “switch off” after the work is done (22%).

downsides to remote working

Key Takeaway: The bottom line is that workers place a high value on the ability to choose where they do their work. They report improved health and better happiness. We know that these factors have an impact on the competitive advantage of the company.

remote workers would reject a job offer that is not flexible

Happiness in the workplace leads to greater productivity, lower absentee rates, and a desire to stay with an employer for a longer period.

These statistics are important for companies who want to use their workforce to their greatest advantage.

remote workers are happier with their job

Now, we have the company perspective on the effects of working from home. The workplace is changing and taking new forms that range from 100% remote work to a hybrid of remote and office work.

In the past, working from home was a popular fantasy that many shared, but how does working from home in your pajamas sound after over a year of doing it?

After facing the realities of working from home, are workers happy, or are they looking forward to going back to the office?

Are remote workers happier?

A growing body of research says that working from home makes people happier. Here are some of the positive effects that workers reported from working from home.

  • Decreased work-related stress
  • Better work-life balance
  • Opportunities for exercise and better diet
  • Increased focus and productivity
  • Freedom to move around and take breaks


These factors tell us why people prefer working from home, but they also tell us what people do not like about working from the office. It can also give companies clues as to how they can make working from the office more attractive in the future.

It is well-established in the field of industrial psychology that there is a positive connection between happiness and productivity.

It has also been found that real-world shocks and stress lower productivity. Happier, less stressed workers are more productive, which could account for some of the productivity increases found earlier in these statistics.

Does working from home make you happy?

A 2020 U.K. study found that 75% of the 2,000 workers surveyed said they were happier working from home.

Of them, 53% said that choosing where they work was having a positive effect on them. Other positive aspects of working from home included:

  • Setting their own schedule
  • Lack of dress code
  • More time for house chores
  • Being less distracted by coworkers.


These workers found many benefits to working from home, but loneliness and a lack of socialization took a toll on some, and this affected their willingness to return to the office. The amount of social contact in a person's life outside of life affected their experience.

What percentage of employees want to work remotely?

In researching these statistics, differences were found among the studies. It is not known if the company or work environment was to blame or if culture and location played a role. A U.K. study found that 88% of employee want to continue working remotely at least part-time.

A recent study in the U.S. found that approximately 38% would like to continue working from home. Workers also reported that they are slightly happier when working from home as compared to a year ago. The question is what conclusion can be drawn from this with such a wide gap in results.

Some smaller studies in the U.S. reported that as many as 99% of workers in the U.S. wanted to continue to work from home. These differences in opinion seem to point to the effect of errors in sampling. In other words, the answer that you get depends on who you ask.

10 Important Remote Workers Happiness Statistics

employees are willing to make sacrifices for the ability to work remotely
  1. Nearly 13% of remote workers reported that they were more likely to stay at their current job for the next five years when compared to those who worked in the office.
  2. Approximately 80% of all workers in a recent survey said that they would reject a job that does not offer the ability to work from home and flexible hours.
  3. Employees said they were willing to make some sacrifices for the ability to work remotely, such as taking on a greater workload, paying for their own technology, giving up company benefits, and taking a pay cut or demotion
  4. Improved work-life balance was the number one reason why workers chose jobs that allowed them to work remotely.
  5. Some of the top reasons, besides work-life balance, why people chose to work remotely were improved productivity, avoiding commuting, less stress, saving money, childcare responsibilities, accommodating a disability, moving home, no company office, and eldercare responsibilities.
  6. Nearly 77% of remote workers reported an improvement in their wellbeing and overall health status.
  7. A study found that 80% of remote workers said they were happy with their job compared to only 55% of those in a traditional office setting.
  8. Having a choice in working location was found to be more important than having a more prestigious role or working for a more prestigious company.
  9. A study found that 61% of all workers have left or considered leaving a job due to a lack of flexibility.
  10. Among the downsides to working at home were loneliness (19%) and the inability to “switch off” after the work is done (22%).

downsides to remote working

Key Takeaway: The bottom line is that workers place a high value on the ability to choose where they do their work. They report improved health and better happiness. We know that these factors have an impact on the competitive advantage of the company.

remote workers would reject a job offer that is not flexible

Happiness in the workplace leads to greater productivity, lower absentee rates, and a desire to stay with an employer for a longer period.

These statistics are important for companies who want to use their workforce to their greatest advantage.

remote workers are happier with their job

Now, we have the company perspective on the effects of working from home. The workplace is changing and taking new forms that range from 100% remote work to a hybrid of remote and office work.

In the past, working from home was a popular fantasy that many shared, but how does working from home in your pajamas sound after over a year of doing it?

After facing the realities of working from home, are workers happy, or are they looking forward to going back to the office?

Are remote workers happier?

A growing body of research says that working from home makes people happier. Here are some of the positive effects that workers reported from working from home.

  • Decreased work-related stress
  • Better work-life balance
  • Opportunities for exercise and better diet
  • Increased focus and productivity
  • Freedom to move around and take breaks


These factors tell us why people prefer working from home, but they also tell us what people do not like about working from the office. It can also give companies clues as to how they can make working from the office more attractive in the future.

It is well-established in the field of industrial psychology that there is a positive connection between happiness and productivity.

It has also been found that real-world shocks and stress lower productivity. Happier, less stressed workers are more productive, which could account for some of the productivity increases found earlier in these statistics.

Does working from home make you happy?

A 2020 U.K. study found that 75% of the 2,000 workers surveyed said they were happier working from home.

Of them, 53% said that choosing where they work was having a positive effect on them. Other positive aspects of working from home included:

  • Setting their own schedule
  • Lack of dress code
  • More time for house chores
  • Being less distracted by coworkers.


These workers found many benefits to working from home, but loneliness and a lack of socialization took a toll on some, and this affected their willingness to return to the office. The amount of social contact in a person's life outside of life affected their experience.

What percentage of employees want to work remotely?

In researching these statistics, differences were found among the studies. It is not known if the company or work environment was to blame or if culture and location played a role. A U.K. study found that 88% of employee want to continue working remotely at least part-time.

A recent study in the U.S. found that approximately 38% would like to continue working from home. Workers also reported that they are slightly happier when working from home as compared to a year ago. The question is what conclusion can be drawn from this with such a wide gap in results.

Some smaller studies in the U.S. reported that as many as 99% of workers in the U.S. wanted to continue to work from home. These differences in opinion seem to point to the effect of errors in sampling. In other words, the answer that you get depends on who you ask.

10 Important Remote Workers Happiness Statistics

employees are willing to make sacrifices for the ability to work remotely
  1. Nearly 13% of remote workers reported that they were more likely to stay at their current job for the next five years when compared to those who worked in the office.
  2. Approximately 80% of all workers in a recent survey said that they would reject a job that does not offer the ability to work from home and flexible hours.
  3. Employees said they were willing to make some sacrifices for the ability to work remotely, such as taking on a greater workload, paying for their own technology, giving up company benefits, and taking a pay cut or demotion
  4. Improved work-life balance was the number one reason why workers chose jobs that allowed them to work remotely.
  5. Some of the top reasons, besides work-life balance, why people chose to work remotely were improved productivity, avoiding commuting, less stress, saving money, childcare responsibilities, accommodating a disability, moving home, no company office, and eldercare responsibilities.
  6. Nearly 77% of remote workers reported an improvement in their wellbeing and overall health status.
  7. A study found that 80% of remote workers said they were happy with their job compared to only 55% of those in a traditional office setting.
  8. Having a choice in working location was found to be more important than having a more prestigious role or working for a more prestigious company.
  9. A study found that 61% of all workers have left or considered leaving a job due to a lack of flexibility.
  10. Among the downsides to working at home were loneliness (19%) and the inability to “switch off” after the work is done (22%).

downsides to remote working

Key Takeaway: The bottom line is that workers place a high value on the ability to choose where they do their work. They report improved health and better happiness. We know that these factors have an impact on the competitive advantage of the company.

remote workers would reject a job offer that is not flexible

Happiness in the workplace leads to greater productivity, lower absentee rates, and a desire to stay with an employer for a longer period.

These statistics are important for companies who want to use their workforce to their greatest advantage.

remote workers are happier with their job

Now, we have the company perspective on the effects of working from home. The workplace is changing and taking new forms that range from 100% remote work to a hybrid of remote and office work.

In the past, working from home was a popular fantasy that many shared, but how does working from home in your pajamas sound after over a year of doing it?

After facing the realities of working from home, are workers happy, or are they looking forward to going back to the office?

Are remote workers happier?

A growing body of research says that working from home makes people happier. Here are some of the positive effects that workers reported from working from home.

  • Decreased work-related stress
  • Better work-life balance
  • Opportunities for exercise and better diet
  • Increased focus and productivity
  • Freedom to move around and take breaks


These factors tell us why people prefer working from home, but they also tell us what people do not like about working from the office. It can also give companies clues as to how they can make working from the office more attractive in the future.

It is well-established in the field of industrial psychology that there is a positive connection between happiness and productivity.

It has also been found that real-world shocks and stress lower productivity. Happier, less stressed workers are more productive, which could account for some of the productivity increases found earlier in these statistics.

Does working from home make you happy?

A 2020 U.K. study found that 75% of the 2,000 workers surveyed said they were happier working from home.

Of them, 53% said that choosing where they work was having a positive effect on them. Other positive aspects of working from home included:

  • Setting their own schedule
  • Lack of dress code
  • More time for house chores
  • Being less distracted by coworkers.


These workers found many benefits to working from home, but loneliness and a lack of socialization took a toll on some, and this affected their willingness to return to the office. The amount of social contact in a person's life outside of life affected their experience.

What percentage of employees want to work remotely?

In researching these statistics, differences were found among the studies. It is not known if the company or work environment was to blame or if culture and location played a role. A U.K. study found that 88% of employee want to continue working remotely at least part-time.

A recent study in the U.S. found that approximately 38% would like to continue working from home. Workers also reported that they are slightly happier when working from home as compared to a year ago. The question is what conclusion can be drawn from this with such a wide gap in results.

Some smaller studies in the U.S. reported that as many as 99% of workers in the U.S. wanted to continue to work from home. These differences in opinion seem to point to the effect of errors in sampling. In other words, the answer that you get depends on who you ask.

10 Important Remote Workers Happiness Statistics

employees are willing to make sacrifices for the ability to work remotely
  1. Nearly 13% of remote workers reported that they were more likely to stay at their current job for the next five years when compared to those who worked in the office.
  2. Approximately 80% of all workers in a recent survey said that they would reject a job that does not offer the ability to work from home and flexible hours.
  3. Employees said they were willing to make some sacrifices for the ability to work remotely, such as taking on a greater workload, paying for their own technology, giving up company benefits, and taking a pay cut or demotion
  4. Improved work-life balance was the number one reason why workers chose jobs that allowed them to work remotely.
  5. Some of the top reasons, besides work-life balance, why people chose to work remotely were improved productivity, avoiding commuting, less stress, saving money, childcare responsibilities, accommodating a disability, moving home, no company office, and eldercare responsibilities.
  6. Nearly 77% of remote workers reported an improvement in their wellbeing and overall health status.
  7. A study found that 80% of remote workers said they were happy with their job compared to only 55% of those in a traditional office setting.
  8. Having a choice in working location was found to be more important than having a more prestigious role or working for a more prestigious company.
  9. A study found that 61% of all workers have left or considered leaving a job due to a lack of flexibility.
  10. Among the downsides to working at home were loneliness (19%) and the inability to “switch off” after the work is done (22%).

downsides to remote working

Key Takeaway: The bottom line is that workers place a high value on the ability to choose where they do their work. They report improved health and better happiness. We know that these factors have an impact on the competitive advantage of the company.

remote workers would reject a job offer that is not flexible

Happiness in the workplace leads to greater productivity, lower absentee rates, and a desire to stay with an employer for a longer period.

These statistics are important for companies who want to use their workforce to their greatest advantage.

remote workers are happier with their job

Now, we have the company perspective on the effects of working from home. The workplace is changing and taking new forms that range from 100% remote work to a hybrid of remote and office work.

In the past, working from home was a popular fantasy that many shared, but how does working from home in your pajamas sound after over a year of doing it?

After facing the realities of working from home, are workers happy, or are they looking forward to going back to the office?

Are remote workers happier?

A growing body of research says that working from home makes people happier. Here are some of the positive effects that workers reported from working from home.

  • Decreased work-related stress
  • Better work-life balance
  • Opportunities for exercise and better diet
  • Increased focus and productivity
  • Freedom to move around and take breaks


These factors tell us why people prefer working from home, but they also tell us what people do not like about working from the office. It can also give companies clues as to how they can make working from the office more attractive in the future.

It is well-established in the field of industrial psychology that there is a positive connection between happiness and productivity.

It has also been found that real-world shocks and stress lower productivity. Happier, less stressed workers are more productive, which could account for some of the productivity increases found earlier in these statistics.

Does working from home make you happy?

A 2020 U.K. study found that 75% of the 2,000 workers surveyed said they were happier working from home.

Of them, 53% said that choosing where they work was having a positive effect on them. Other positive aspects of working from home included:

  • Setting their own schedule
  • Lack of dress code
  • More time for house chores
  • Being less distracted by coworkers.


These workers found many benefits to working from home, but loneliness and a lack of socialization took a toll on some, and this affected their willingness to return to the office. The amount of social contact in a person's life outside of life affected their experience.

What percentage of employees want to work remotely?

In researching these statistics, differences were found among the studies. It is not known if the company or work environment was to blame or if culture and location played a role. A U.K. study found that 88% of employee want to continue working remotely at least part-time.

A recent study in the U.S. found that approximately 38% would like to continue working from home. Workers also reported that they are slightly happier when working from home as compared to a year ago. The question is what conclusion can be drawn from this with such a wide gap in results.

Some smaller studies in the U.S. reported that as many as 99% of workers in the U.S. wanted to continue to work from home. These differences in opinion seem to point to the effect of errors in sampling. In other words, the answer that you get depends on who you ask.

10 Important Remote Workers Happiness Statistics

employees are willing to make sacrifices for the ability to work remotely
  1. Nearly 13% of remote workers reported that they were more likely to stay at their current job for the next five years when compared to those who worked in the office.
  2. Approximately 80% of all workers in a recent survey said that they would reject a job that does not offer the ability to work from home and flexible hours.
  3. Employees said they were willing to make some sacrifices for the ability to work remotely, such as taking on a greater workload, paying for their own technology, giving up company benefits, and taking a pay cut or demotion
  4. Improved work-life balance was the number one reason why workers chose jobs that allowed them to work remotely.
  5. Some of the top reasons, besides work-life balance, why people chose to work remotely were improved productivity, avoiding commuting, less stress, saving money, childcare responsibilities, accommodating a disability, moving home, no company office, and eldercare responsibilities.
  6. Nearly 77% of remote workers reported an improvement in their wellbeing and overall health status.
  7. A study found that 80% of remote workers said they were happy with their job compared to only 55% of those in a traditional office setting.
  8. Having a choice in working location was found to be more important than having a more prestigious role or working for a more prestigious company.
  9. A study found that 61% of all workers have left or considered leaving a job due to a lack of flexibility.
  10. Among the downsides to working at home were loneliness (19%) and the inability to “switch off” after the work is done (22%).

downsides to remote working

Key Takeaway: The bottom line is that workers place a high value on the ability to choose where they do their work. They report improved health and better happiness. We know that these factors have an impact on the competitive advantage of the company.

remote workers would reject a job offer that is not flexible

Happiness in the workplace leads to greater productivity, lower absentee rates, and a desire to stay with an employer for a longer period.

These statistics are important for companies who want to use their workforce to their greatest advantage.

remote workers are happier with their job

Now, we have the company perspective on the effects of working from home. The workplace is changing and taking new forms that range from 100% remote work to a hybrid of remote and office work.

In the past, working from home was a popular fantasy that many shared, but how does working from home in your pajamas sound after over a year of doing it?

After facing the realities of working from home, are workers happy, or are they looking forward to going back to the office?

Are remote workers happier?

A growing body of research says that working from home makes people happier. Here are some of the positive effects that workers reported from working from home.

  • Decreased work-related stress
  • Better work-life balance
  • Opportunities for exercise and better diet
  • Increased focus and productivity
  • Freedom to move around and take breaks


These factors tell us why people prefer working from home, but they also tell us what people do not like about working from the office. It can also give companies clues as to how they can make working from the office more attractive in the future.

It is well-established in the field of industrial psychology that there is a positive connection between happiness and productivity.

It has also been found that real-world shocks and stress lower productivity. Happier, less stressed workers are more productive, which could account for some of the productivity increases found earlier in these statistics.

Does working from home make you happy?

A 2020 U.K. study found that 75% of the 2,000 workers surveyed said they were happier working from home.

Of them, 53% said that choosing where they work was having a positive effect on them. Other positive aspects of working from home included:

  • Setting their own schedule
  • Lack of dress code
  • More time for house chores
  • Being less distracted by coworkers.


These workers found many benefits to working from home, but loneliness and a lack of socialization took a toll on some, and this affected their willingness to return to the office. The amount of social contact in a person's life outside of life affected their experience.

What percentage of employees want to work remotely?

In researching these statistics, differences were found among the studies. It is not known if the company or work environment was to blame or if culture and location played a role. A U.K. study found that 88% of employee want to continue working remotely at least part-time.

A recent study in the U.S. found that approximately 38% would like to continue working from home. Workers also reported that they are slightly happier when working from home as compared to a year ago. The question is what conclusion can be drawn from this with such a wide gap in results.

Some smaller studies in the U.S. reported that as many as 99% of workers in the U.S. wanted to continue to work from home. These differences in opinion seem to point to the effect of errors in sampling. In other words, the answer that you get depends on who you ask.

10 Important Remote Workers Happiness Statistics

employees are willing to make sacrifices for the ability to work remotely
  1. Nearly 13% of remote workers reported that they were more likely to stay at their current job for the next five years when compared to those who worked in the office.
  2. Approximately 80% of all workers in a recent survey said that they would reject a job that does not offer the ability to work from home and flexible hours.
  3. Employees said they were willing to make some sacrifices for the ability to work remotely, such as taking on a greater workload, paying for their own technology, giving up company benefits, and taking a pay cut or demotion
  4. Improved work-life balance was the number one reason why workers chose jobs that allowed them to work remotely.
  5. Some of the top reasons, besides work-life balance, why people chose to work remotely were improved productivity, avoiding commuting, less stress, saving money, childcare responsibilities, accommodating a disability, moving home, no company office, and eldercare responsibilities.
  6. Nearly 77% of remote workers reported an improvement in their wellbeing and overall health status.
  7. A study found that 80% of remote workers said they were happy with their job compared to only 55% of those in a traditional office setting.
  8. Having a choice in working location was found to be more important than having a more prestigious role or working for a more prestigious company.
  9. A study found that 61% of all workers have left or considered leaving a job due to a lack of flexibility.
  10. Among the downsides to working at home were loneliness (19%) and the inability to “switch off” after the work is done (22%).

downsides to remote working

Key Takeaway: The bottom line is that workers place a high value on the ability to choose where they do their work. They report improved health and better happiness. We know that these factors have an impact on the competitive advantage of the company.

remote workers would reject a job offer that is not flexible

Happiness in the workplace leads to greater productivity, lower absentee rates, and a desire to stay with an employer for a longer period.

These statistics are important for companies who want to use their workforce to their greatest advantage.

remote workers are happier with their job

Now, we have the company perspective on the effects of working from home. The workplace is changing and taking new forms that range from 100% remote work to a hybrid of remote and office work.

In the past, working from home was a popular fantasy that many shared, but how does working from home in your pajamas sound after over a year of doing it?

After facing the realities of working from home, are workers happy, or are they looking forward to going back to the office?

Are remote workers happier?

A growing body of research says that working from home makes people happier. Here are some of the positive effects that workers reported from working from home.

  • Decreased work-related stress
  • Better work-life balance
  • Opportunities for exercise and better diet
  • Increased focus and productivity
  • Freedom to move around and take breaks


These factors tell us why people prefer working from home, but they also tell us what people do not like about working from the office. It can also give companies clues as to how they can make working from the office more attractive in the future.

It is well-established in the field of industrial psychology that there is a positive connection between happiness and productivity.

It has also been found that real-world shocks and stress lower productivity. Happier, less stressed workers are more productive, which could account for some of the productivity increases found earlier in these statistics.

Does working from home make you happy?

A 2020 U.K. study found that 75% of the 2,000 workers surveyed said they were happier working from home.

Of them, 53% said that choosing where they work was having a positive effect on them. Other positive aspects of working from home included:

  • Setting their own schedule
  • Lack of dress code
  • More time for house chores
  • Being less distracted by coworkers.


These workers found many benefits to working from home, but loneliness and a lack of socialization took a toll on some, and this affected their willingness to return to the office. The amount of social contact in a person's life outside of life affected their experience.

What percentage of employees want to work remotely?

In researching these statistics, differences were found among the studies. It is not known if the company or work environment was to blame or if culture and location played a role. A U.K. study found that 88% of employee want to continue working remotely at least part-time.

A recent study in the U.S. found that approximately 38% would like to continue working from home. Workers also reported that they are slightly happier when working from home as compared to a year ago. The question is what conclusion can be drawn from this with such a wide gap in results.

Some smaller studies in the U.S. reported that as many as 99% of workers in the U.S. wanted to continue to work from home. These differences in opinion seem to point to the effect of errors in sampling. In other words, the answer that you get depends on who you ask.

10 Important Remote Workers Happiness Statistics

employees are willing to make sacrifices for the ability to work remotely
  1. Nearly 13% of remote workers reported that they were more likely to stay at their current job for the next five years when compared to those who worked in the office.
  2. Approximately 80% of all workers in a recent survey said that they would reject a job that does not offer the ability to work from home and flexible hours.
  3. Employees said they were willing to make some sacrifices for the ability to work remotely, such as taking on a greater workload, paying for their own technology, giving up company benefits, and taking a pay cut or demotion
  4. Improved work-life balance was the number one reason why workers chose jobs that allowed them to work remotely.
  5. Some of the top reasons, besides work-life balance, why people chose to work remotely were improved productivity, avoiding commuting, less stress, saving money, childcare responsibilities, accommodating a disability, moving home, no company office, and eldercare responsibilities.
  6. Nearly 77% of remote workers reported an improvement in their wellbeing and overall health status.
  7. A study found that 80% of remote workers said they were happy with their job compared to only 55% of those in a traditional office setting.
  8. Having a choice in working location was found to be more important than having a more prestigious role or working for a more prestigious company.
  9. A study found that 61% of all workers have left or considered leaving a job due to a lack of flexibility.
  10. Among the downsides to working at home were loneliness (19%) and the inability to “switch off” after the work is done (22%).

downsides to remote working

Key Takeaway: The bottom line is that workers place a high value on the ability to choose where they do their work. They report improved health and better happiness. We know that these factors have an impact on the competitive advantage of the company.

remote workers would reject a job offer that is not flexible

Happiness in the workplace leads to greater productivity, lower absentee rates, and a desire to stay with an employer for a longer period.

These statistics are important for companies who want to use their workforce to their greatest advantage.

remote workers are happier with their job

Now, we have the company perspective on the effects of working from home. The workplace is changing and taking new forms that range from 100% remote work to a hybrid of remote and office work.

In the past, working from home was a popular fantasy that many shared, but how does working from home in your pajamas sound after over a year of doing it?

After facing the realities of working from home, are workers happy, or are they looking forward to going back to the office?

Are remote workers happier?

A growing body of research says that working from home makes people happier. Here are some of the positive effects that workers reported from working from home.

  • Decreased work-related stress
  • Better work-life balance
  • Opportunities for exercise and better diet
  • Increased focus and productivity
  • Freedom to move around and take breaks


These factors tell us why people prefer working from home, but they also tell us what people do not like about working from the office. It can also give companies clues as to how they can make working from the office more attractive in the future.

It is well-established in the field of industrial psychology that there is a positive connection between happiness and productivity.

It has also been found that real-world shocks and stress lower productivity. Happier, less stressed workers are more productive, which could account for some of the productivity increases found earlier in these statistics.

Does working from home make you happy?

A 2020 U.K. study found that 75% of the 2,000 workers surveyed said they were happier working from home.

Of them, 53% said that choosing where they work was having a positive effect on them. Other positive aspects of working from home included:

  • Setting their own schedule
  • Lack of dress code
  • More time for house chores
  • Being less distracted by coworkers.


These workers found many benefits to working from home, but loneliness and a lack of socialization took a toll on some, and this affected their willingness to return to the office. The amount of social contact in a person's life outside of life affected their experience.

What percentage of employees want to work remotely?

In researching these statistics, differences were found among the studies. It is not known if the company or work environment was to blame or if culture and location played a role. A U.K. study found that 88% of employee want to continue working remotely at least part-time.

A recent study in the U.S. found that approximately 38% would like to continue working from home. Workers also reported that they are slightly happier when working from home as compared to a year ago. The question is what conclusion can be drawn from this with such a wide gap in results.

Some smaller studies in the U.S. reported that as many as 99% of workers in the U.S. wanted to continue to work from home. These differences in opinion seem to point to the effect of errors in sampling. In other words, the answer that you get depends on who you ask.

10 Important Remote Workers Happiness Statistics

employees are willing to make sacrifices for the ability to work remotely
  1. Nearly 13% of remote workers reported that they were more likely to stay at their current job for the next five years when compared to those who worked in the office.
  2. Approximately 80% of all workers in a recent survey said that they would reject a job that does not offer the ability to work from home and flexible hours.
  3. Employees said they were willing to make some sacrifices for the ability to work remotely, such as taking on a greater workload, paying for their own technology, giving up company benefits, and taking a pay cut or demotion
  4. Improved work-life balance was the number one reason why workers chose jobs that allowed them to work remotely.
  5. Some of the top reasons, besides work-life balance, why people chose to work remotely were improved productivity, avoiding commuting, less stress, saving money, childcare responsibilities, accommodating a disability, moving home, no company office, and eldercare responsibilities.
  6. Nearly 77% of remote workers reported an improvement in their wellbeing and overall health status.
  7. A study found that 80% of remote workers said they were happy with their job compared to only 55% of those in a traditional office setting.
  8. Having a choice in working location was found to be more important than having a more prestigious role or working for a more prestigious company.
  9. A study found that 61% of all workers have left or considered leaving a job due to a lack of flexibility.
  10. Among the downsides to working at home were loneliness (19%) and the inability to “switch off” after the work is done (22%).

downsides to remote working

Key Takeaway: The bottom line is that workers place a high value on the ability to choose where they do their work. They report improved health and better happiness. We know that these factors have an impact on the competitive advantage of the company.

remote workers would reject a job offer that is not flexible

Happiness in the workplace leads to greater productivity, lower absentee rates, and a desire to stay with an employer for a longer period.

These statistics are important for companies who want to use their workforce to their greatest advantage.

remote workers are happier with their job

Now, we have the company perspective on the effects of working from home. The workplace is changing and taking new forms that range from 100% remote work to a hybrid of remote and office work.

In the past, working from home was a popular fantasy that many shared, but how does working from home in your pajamas sound after over a year of doing it?

After facing the realities of working from home, are workers happy, or are they looking forward to going back to the office?

Are remote workers happier?

A growing body of research says that working from home makes people happier. Here are some of the positive effects that workers reported from working from home.

  • Decreased work-related stress
  • Better work-life balance
  • Opportunities for exercise and better diet
  • Increased focus and productivity
  • Freedom to move around and take breaks


These factors tell us why people prefer working from home, but they also tell us what people do not like about working from the office. It can also give companies clues as to how they can make working from the office more attractive in the future.

It is well-established in the field of industrial psychology that there is a positive connection between happiness and productivity.

It has also been found that real-world shocks and stress lower productivity. Happier, less stressed workers are more productive, which could account for some of the productivity increases found earlier in these statistics.

Does working from home make you happy?

A 2020 U.K. study found that 75% of the 2,000 workers surveyed said they were happier working from home.

Of them, 53% said that choosing where they work was having a positive effect on them. Other positive aspects of working from home included:

  • Setting their own schedule
  • Lack of dress code
  • More time for house chores
  • Being less distracted by coworkers.


These workers found many benefits to working from home, but loneliness and a lack of socialization took a toll on some, and this affected their willingness to return to the office. The amount of social contact in a person's life outside of life affected their experience.

What percentage of employees want to work remotely?

In researching these statistics, differences were found among the studies. It is not known if the company or work environment was to blame or if culture and location played a role. A U.K. study found that 88% of employee want to continue working remotely at least part-time.

A recent study in the U.S. found that approximately 38% would like to continue working from home. Workers also reported that they are slightly happier when working from home as compared to a year ago. The question is what conclusion can be drawn from this with such a wide gap in results.

Some smaller studies in the U.S. reported that as many as 99% of workers in the U.S. wanted to continue to work from home. These differences in opinion seem to point to the effect of errors in sampling. In other words, the answer that you get depends on who you ask.

10 Important Remote Workers Happiness Statistics

employees are willing to make sacrifices for the ability to work remotely
  1. Nearly 13% of remote workers reported that they were more likely to stay at their current job for the next five years when compared to those who worked in the office.
  2. Approximately 80% of all workers in a recent survey said that they would reject a job that does not offer the ability to work from home and flexible hours.
  3. Employees said they were willing to make some sacrifices for the ability to work remotely, such as taking on a greater workload, paying for their own technology, giving up company benefits, and taking a pay cut or demotion
  4. Improved work-life balance was the number one reason why workers chose jobs that allowed them to work remotely.
  5. Some of the top reasons, besides work-life balance, why people chose to work remotely were improved productivity, avoiding commuting, less stress, saving money, childcare responsibilities, accommodating a disability, moving home, no company office, and eldercare responsibilities.
  6. Nearly 77% of remote workers reported an improvement in their wellbeing and overall health status.
  7. A study found that 80% of remote workers said they were happy with their job compared to only 55% of those in a traditional office setting.
  8. Having a choice in working location was found to be more important than having a more prestigious role or working for a more prestigious company.
  9. A study found that 61% of all workers have left or considered leaving a job due to a lack of flexibility.
  10. Among the downsides to working at home were loneliness (19%) and the inability to “switch off” after the work is done (22%).

downsides to remote working

Key Takeaway: The bottom line is that workers place a high value on the ability to choose where they do their work. They report improved health and better happiness. We know that these factors have an impact on the competitive advantage of the company.

remote workers would reject a job offer that is not flexible

Happiness in the workplace leads to greater productivity, lower absentee rates, and a desire to stay with an employer for a longer period.

These statistics are important for companies who want to use their workforce to their greatest advantage.

remote workers are happier with their job

Now, we have the company perspective on the effects of working from home. The workplace is changing and taking new forms that range from 100% remote work to a hybrid of remote and office work.

In the past, working from home was a popular fantasy that many shared, but how does working from home in your pajamas sound after over a year of doing it?

After facing the realities of working from home, are workers happy, or are they looking forward to going back to the office?

Are remote workers happier?

A growing body of research says that working from home makes people happier. Here are some of the positive effects that workers reported from working from home.

  • Decreased work-related stress
  • Better work-life balance
  • Opportunities for exercise and better diet
  • Increased focus and productivity
  • Freedom to move around and take breaks


These factors tell us why people prefer working from home, but they also tell us what people do not like about working from the office. It can also give companies clues as to how they can make working from the office more attractive in the future.

It is well-established in the field of industrial psychology that there is a positive connection between happiness and productivity.

It has also been found that real-world shocks and stress lower productivity. Happier, less stressed workers are more productive, which could account for some of the productivity increases found earlier in these statistics.

Does working from home make you happy?

A 2020 U.K. study found that 75% of the 2,000 workers surveyed said they were happier working from home.

Of them, 53% said that choosing where they work was having a positive effect on them. Other positive aspects of working from home included:

  • Setting their own schedule
  • Lack of dress code
  • More time for house chores
  • Being less distracted by coworkers.


These workers found many benefits to working from home, but loneliness and a lack of socialization took a toll on some, and this affected their willingness to return to the office. The amount of social contact in a person's life outside of life affected their experience.

What percentage of employees want to work remotely?

In researching these statistics, differences were found among the studies. It is not known if the company or work environment was to blame or if culture and location played a role. A U.K. study found that 88% of employee want to continue working remotely at least part-time.

A recent study in the U.S. found that approximately 38% would like to continue working from home. Workers also reported that they are slightly happier when working from home as compared to a year ago. The question is what conclusion can be drawn from this with such a wide gap in results.

Some smaller studies in the U.S. reported that as many as 99% of workers in the U.S. wanted to continue to work from home. These differences in opinion seem to point to the effect of errors in sampling. In other words, the answer that you get depends on who you ask.

10 Important Remote Workers Happiness Statistics

employees are willing to make sacrifices for the ability to work remotely
  1. Nearly 13% of remote workers reported that they were more likely to stay at their current job for the next five years when compared to those who worked in the office.
  2. Approximately 80% of all workers in a recent survey said that they would reject a job that does not offer the ability to work from home and flexible hours.
  3. Employees said they were willing to make some sacrifices for the ability to work remotely, such as taking on a greater workload, paying for their own technology, giving up company benefits, and taking a pay cut or demotion
  4. Improved work-life balance was the number one reason why workers chose jobs that allowed them to work remotely.
  5. Some of the top reasons, besides work-life balance, why people chose to work remotely were improved productivity, avoiding commuting, less stress, saving money, childcare responsibilities, accommodating a disability, moving home, no company office, and eldercare responsibilities.
  6. Nearly 77% of remote workers reported an improvement in their wellbeing and overall health status.
  7. A study found that 80% of remote workers said they were happy with their job compared to only 55% of those in a traditional office setting.
  8. Having a choice in working location was found to be more important than having a more prestigious role or working for a more prestigious company.
  9. A study found that 61% of all workers have left or considered leaving a job due to a lack of flexibility.
  10. Among the downsides to working at home were loneliness (19%) and the inability to “switch off” after the work is done (22%).

downsides to remote working

Key Takeaway: The bottom line is that workers place a high value on the ability to choose where they do their work. They report improved health and better happiness. We know that these factors have an impact on the competitive advantage of the company.

remote workers would reject a job offer that is not flexible

Happiness in the workplace leads to greater productivity, lower absentee rates, and a desire to stay with an employer for a longer period.

These statistics are important for companies who want to use their workforce to their greatest advantage.

remote workers are happier with their job

Now, we have the company perspective on the effects of working from home. The workplace is changing and taking new forms that range from 100% remote work to a hybrid of remote and office work.

In the past, working from home was a popular fantasy that many shared, but how does working from home in your pajamas sound after over a year of doing it?

After facing the realities of working from home, are workers happy, or are they looking forward to going back to the office?

Are remote workers happier?

A growing body of research says that working from home makes people happier. Here are some of the positive effects that workers reported from working from home.

  • Decreased work-related stress
  • Better work-life balance
  • Opportunities for exercise and better diet
  • Increased focus and productivity
  • Freedom to move around and take breaks


These factors tell us why people prefer working from home, but they also tell us what people do not like about working from the office. It can also give companies clues as to how they can make working from the office more attractive in the future.

It is well-established in the field of industrial psychology that there is a positive connection between happiness and productivity.

It has also been found that real-world shocks and stress lower productivity. Happier, less stressed workers are more productive, which could account for some of the productivity increases found earlier in these statistics.

Does working from home make you happy?

A 2020 U.K. study found that 75% of the 2,000 workers surveyed said they were happier working from home.

Of them, 53% said that choosing where they work was having a positive effect on them. Other positive aspects of working from home included:

  • Setting their own schedule
  • Lack of dress code
  • More time for house chores
  • Being less distracted by coworkers.


These workers found many benefits to working from home, but loneliness and a lack of socialization took a toll on some, and this affected their willingness to return to the office. The amount of social contact in a person's life outside of life affected their experience.

What percentage of employees want to work remotely?

In researching these statistics, differences were found among the studies. It is not known if the company or work environment was to blame or if culture and location played a role. A U.K. study found that 88% of employee want to continue working remotely at least part-time.

A recent study in the U.S. found that approximately 38% would like to continue working from home. Workers also reported that they are slightly happier when working from home as compared to a year ago. The question is what conclusion can be drawn from this with such a wide gap in results.

Some smaller studies in the U.S. reported that as many as 99% of workers in the U.S. wanted to continue to work from home. These differences in opinion seem to point to the effect of errors in sampling. In other words, the answer that you get depends on who you ask.

10 Important Remote Workers Happiness Statistics

employees are willing to make sacrifices for the ability to work remotely
  1. Nearly 13% of remote workers reported that they were more likely to stay at their current job for the next five years when compared to those who worked in the office.
  2. Approximately 80% of all workers in a recent survey said that they would reject a job that does not offer the ability to work from home and flexible hours.
  3. Employees said they were willing to make some sacrifices for the ability to work remotely, such as taking on a greater workload, paying for their own technology, giving up company benefits, and taking a pay cut or demotion
  4. Improved work-life balance was the number one reason why workers chose jobs that allowed them to work remotely.
  5. Some of the top reasons, besides work-life balance, why people chose to work remotely were improved productivity, avoiding commuting, less stress, saving money, childcare responsibilities, accommodating a disability, moving home, no company office, and eldercare responsibilities.
  6. Nearly 77% of remote workers reported an improvement in their wellbeing and overall health status.
  7. A study found that 80% of remote workers said they were happy with their job compared to only 55% of those in a traditional office setting.
  8. Having a choice in working location was found to be more important than having a more prestigious role or working for a more prestigious company.
  9. A study found that 61% of all workers have left or considered leaving a job due to a lack of flexibility.
  10. Among the downsides to working at home were loneliness (19%) and the inability to “switch off” after the work is done (22%).

downsides to remote working

Key Takeaway: The bottom line is that workers place a high value on the ability to choose where they do their work. They report improved health and better happiness. We know that these factors have an impact on the competitive advantage of the company.

remote workers would reject a job offer that is not flexible

Happiness in the workplace leads to greater productivity, lower absentee rates, and a desire to stay with an employer for a longer period.

These statistics are important for companies who want to use their workforce to their greatest advantage.

remote workers are happier with their job

Now, we have the company perspective on the effects of working from home. The workplace is changing and taking new forms that range from 100% remote work to a hybrid of remote and office work.

In the past, working from home was a popular fantasy that many shared, but how does working from home in your pajamas sound after over a year of doing it?

After facing the realities of working from home, are workers happy, or are they looking forward to going back to the office?

Are remote workers happier?

A growing body of research says that working from home makes people happier. Here are some of the positive effects that workers reported from working from home.

  • Decreased work-related stress
  • Better work-life balance
  • Opportunities for exercise and better diet
  • Increased focus and productivity
  • Freedom to move around and take breaks


These factors tell us why people prefer working from home, but they also tell us what people do not like about working from the office. It can also give companies clues as to how they can make working from the office more attractive in the future.

It is well-established in the field of industrial psychology that there is a positive connection between happiness and productivity.

It has also been found that real-world shocks and stress lower productivity. Happier, less stressed workers are more productive, which could account for some of the productivity increases found earlier in these statistics.

Does working from home make you happy?

A 2020 U.K. study found that 75% of the 2,000 workers surveyed said they were happier working from home.

Of them, 53% said that choosing where they work was having a positive effect on them. Other positive aspects of working from home included:

  • Setting their own schedule
  • Lack of dress code
  • More time for house chores
  • Being less distracted by coworkers.


These workers found many benefits to working from home, but loneliness and a lack of socialization took a toll on some, and this affected their willingness to return to the office. The amount of social contact in a person's life outside of life affected their experience.

What percentage of employees want to work remotely?

In researching these statistics, differences were found among the studies. It is not known if the company or work environment was to blame or if culture and location played a role. A U.K. study found that 88% of employee want to continue working remotely at least part-time.

A recent study in the U.S. found that approximately 38% would like to continue working from home. Workers also reported that they are slightly happier when working from home as compared to a year ago. The question is what conclusion can be drawn from this with such a wide gap in results.

Some smaller studies in the U.S. reported that as many as 99% of workers in the U.S. wanted to continue to work from home. These differences in opinion seem to point to the effect of errors in sampling. In other words, the answer that you get depends on who you ask.

10 Important Remote Workers Happiness Statistics

employees are willing to make sacrifices for the ability to work remotely
  1. Nearly 13% of remote workers reported that they were more likely to stay at their current job for the next five years when compared to those who worked in the office.
  2. Approximately 80% of all workers in a recent survey said that they would reject a job that does not offer the ability to work from home and flexible hours.
  3. Employees said they were willing to make some sacrifices for the ability to work remotely, such as taking on a greater workload, paying for their own technology, giving up company benefits, and taking a pay cut or demotion
  4. Improved work-life balance was the number one reason why workers chose jobs that allowed them to work remotely.
  5. Some of the top reasons, besides work-life balance, why people chose to work remotely were improved productivity, avoiding commuting, less stress, saving money, childcare responsibilities, accommodating a disability, moving home, no company office, and eldercare responsibilities.
  6. Nearly 77% of remote workers reported an improvement in their wellbeing and overall health status.
  7. A study found that 80% of remote workers said they were happy with their job compared to only 55% of those in a traditional office setting.
  8. Having a choice in working location was found to be more important than having a more prestigious role or working for a more prestigious company.
  9. A study found that 61% of all workers have left or considered leaving a job due to a lack of flexibility.
  10. Among the downsides to working at home were loneliness (19%) and the inability to “switch off” after the work is done (22%).

downsides to remote working

Key Takeaway: The bottom line is that workers place a high value on the ability to choose where they do their work. They report improved health and better happiness. We know that these factors have an impact on the competitive advantage of the company.

remote workers would reject a job offer that is not flexible

Happiness in the workplace leads to greater productivity, lower absentee rates, and a desire to stay with an employer for a longer period.

These statistics are important for companies who want to use their workforce to their greatest advantage.

remote workers are happier with their job

Now, we have the company perspective on the effects of working from home. The workplace is changing and taking new forms that range from 100% remote work to a hybrid of remote and office work.

In the past, working from home was a popular fantasy that many shared, but how does working from home in your pajamas sound after over a year of doing it?

After facing the realities of working from home, are workers happy, or are they looking forward to going back to the office?

Are remote workers happier?

A growing body of research says that working from home makes people happier. Here are some of the positive effects that workers reported from working from home.

  • Decreased work-related stress
  • Better work-life balance
  • Opportunities for exercise and better diet
  • Increased focus and productivity
  • Freedom to move around and take breaks


These factors tell us why people prefer working from home, but they also tell us what people do not like about working from the office. It can also give companies clues as to how they can make working from the office more attractive in the future.

It is well-established in the field of industrial psychology that there is a positive connection between happiness and productivity.

It has also been found that real-world shocks and stress lower productivity. Happier, less stressed workers are more productive, which could account for some of the productivity increases found earlier in these statistics.

Does working from home make you happy?

A 2020 U.K. study found that 75% of the 2,000 workers surveyed said they were happier working from home.

Of them, 53% said that choosing where they work was having a positive effect on them. Other positive aspects of working from home included:

  • Setting their own schedule
  • Lack of dress code
  • More time for house chores
  • Being less distracted by coworkers.


These workers found many benefits to working from home, but loneliness and a lack of socialization took a toll on some, and this affected their willingness to return to the office. The amount of social contact in a person's life outside of life affected their experience.

What percentage of employees want to work remotely?

In researching these statistics, differences were found among the studies. It is not known if the company or work environment was to blame or if culture and location played a role. A U.K. study found that 88% of employee want to continue working remotely at least part-time.

A recent study in the U.S. found that approximately 38% would like to continue working from home. Workers also reported that they are slightly happier when working from home as compared to a year ago. The question is what conclusion can be drawn from this with such a wide gap in results.

Some smaller studies in the U.S. reported that as many as 99% of workers in the U.S. wanted to continue to work from home. These differences in opinion seem to point to the effect of errors in sampling. In other words, the answer that you get depends on who you ask.

10 Important Remote Workers Happiness Statistics

employees are willing to make sacrifices for the ability to work remotely
  1. Nearly 13% of remote workers reported that they were more likely to stay at their current job for the next five years when compared to those who worked in the office.
  2. Approximately 80% of all workers in a recent survey said that they would reject a job that does not offer the ability to work from home and flexible hours.
  3. Employees said they were willing to make some sacrifices for the ability to work remotely, such as taking on a greater workload, paying for their own technology, giving up company benefits, and taking a pay cut or demotion
  4. Improved work-life balance was the number one reason why workers chose jobs that allowed them to work remotely.
  5. Some of the top reasons, besides work-life balance, why people chose to work remotely were improved productivity, avoiding commuting, less stress, saving money, childcare responsibilities, accommodating a disability, moving home, no company office, and eldercare responsibilities.
  6. Nearly 77% of remote workers reported an improvement in their wellbeing and overall health status.
  7. A study found that 80% of remote workers said they were happy with their job compared to only 55% of those in a traditional office setting.
  8. Having a choice in working location was found to be more important than having a more prestigious role or working for a more prestigious company.
  9. A study found that 61% of all workers have left or considered leaving a job due to a lack of flexibility.
  10. Among the downsides to working at home were loneliness (19%) and the inability to “switch off” after the work is done (22%).

downsides to remote working

Key Takeaway: The bottom line is that workers place a high value on the ability to choose where they do their work. They report improved health and better happiness. We know that these factors have an impact on the competitive advantage of the company.

remote workers would reject a job offer that is not flexible

Happiness in the workplace leads to greater productivity, lower absentee rates, and a desire to stay with an employer for a longer period.

These statistics are important for companies who want to use their workforce to their greatest advantage.

remote workers are happier with their job

Now, we have the company perspective on the effects of working from home. The workplace is changing and taking new forms that range from 100% remote work to a hybrid of remote and office work.

In the past, working from home was a popular fantasy that many shared, but how does working from home in your pajamas sound after over a year of doing it?

After facing the realities of working from home, are workers happy, or are they looking forward to going back to the office?

Are remote workers happier?

A growing body of research says that working from home makes people happier. Here are some of the positive effects that workers reported from working from home.

  • Decreased work-related stress
  • Better work-life balance
  • Opportunities for exercise and better diet
  • Increased focus and productivity
  • Freedom to move around and take breaks


These factors tell us why people prefer working from home, but they also tell us what people do not like about working from the office. It can also give companies clues as to how they can make working from the office more attractive in the future.

It is well-established in the field of industrial psychology that there is a positive connection between happiness and productivity.

It has also been found that real-world shocks and stress lower productivity. Happier, less stressed workers are more productive, which could account for some of the productivity increases found earlier in these statistics.

Does working from home make you happy?

A 2020 U.K. study found that 75% of the 2,000 workers surveyed said they were happier working from home.

Of them, 53% said that choosing where they work was having a positive effect on them. Other positive aspects of working from home included:

  • Setting their own schedule
  • Lack of dress code
  • More time for house chores
  • Being less distracted by coworkers.


These workers found many benefits to working from home, but loneliness and a lack of socialization took a toll on some, and this affected their willingness to return to the office. The amount of social contact in a person's life outside of life affected their experience.

What percentage of employees want to work remotely?

In researching these statistics, differences were found among the studies. It is not known if the company or work environment was to blame or if culture and location played a role. A U.K. study found that 88% of employee want to continue working remotely at least part-time.

A recent study in the U.S. found that approximately 38% would like to continue working from home. Workers also reported that they are slightly happier when working from home as compared to a year ago. The question is what conclusion can be drawn from this with such a wide gap in results.

Some smaller studies in the U.S. reported that as many as 99% of workers in the U.S. wanted to continue to work from home. These differences in opinion seem to point to the effect of errors in sampling. In other words, the answer that you get depends on who you ask.

10 Important Remote Workers Happiness Statistics

employees are willing to make sacrifices for the ability to work remotely
  1. Nearly 13% of remote workers reported that they were more likely to stay at their current job for the next five years when compared to those who worked in the office.
  2. Approximately 80% of all workers in a recent survey said that they would reject a job that does not offer the ability to work from home and flexible hours.
  3. Employees said they were willing to make some sacrifices for the ability to work remotely, such as taking on a greater workload, paying for their own technology, giving up company benefits, and taking a pay cut or demotion
  4. Improved work-life balance was the number one reason why workers chose jobs that allowed them to work remotely.
  5. Some of the top reasons, besides work-life balance, why people chose to work remotely were improved productivity, avoiding commuting, less stress, saving money, childcare responsibilities, accommodating a disability, moving home, no company office, and eldercare responsibilities.
  6. Nearly 77% of remote workers reported an improvement in their wellbeing and overall health status.
  7. A study found that 80% of remote workers said they were happy with their job compared to only 55% of those in a traditional office setting.
  8. Having a choice in working location was found to be more important than having a more prestigious role or working for a more prestigious company.
  9. A study found that 61% of all workers have left or considered leaving a job due to a lack of flexibility.
  10. Among the downsides to working at home were loneliness (19%) and the inability to “switch off” after the work is done (22%).

downsides to remote working

Key Takeaway: The bottom line is that workers place a high value on the ability to choose where they do their work. They report improved health and better happiness. We know that these factors have an impact on the competitive advantage of the company.

remote workers would reject a job offer that is not flexible

Happiness in the workplace leads to greater productivity, lower absentee rates, and a desire to stay with an employer for a longer period.

These statistics are important for companies who want to use their workforce to their greatest advantage.

remote workers are happier with their job

Now, we have the company perspective on the effects of working from home. The workplace is changing and taking new forms that range from 100% remote work to a hybrid of remote and office work.

In the past, working from home was a popular fantasy that many shared, but how does working from home in your pajamas sound after over a year of doing it?

After facing the realities of working from home, are workers happy, or are they looking forward to going back to the office?

Are remote workers happier?

A growing body of research says that working from home makes people happier. Here are some of the positive effects that workers reported from working from home.

  • Decreased work-related stress
  • Better work-life balance
  • Opportunities for exercise and better diet
  • Increased focus and productivity
  • Freedom to move around and take breaks


These factors tell us why people prefer working from home, but they also tell us what people do not like about working from the office. It can also give companies clues as to how they can make working from the office more attractive in the future.

It is well-established in the field of industrial psychology that there is a positive connection between happiness and productivity.

It has also been found that real-world shocks and stress lower productivity. Happier, less stressed workers are more productive, which could account for some of the productivity increases found earlier in these statistics.

Does working from home make you happy?

A 2020 U.K. study found that 75% of the 2,000 workers surveyed said they were happier working from home.

Of them, 53% said that choosing where they work was having a positive effect on them. Other positive aspects of working from home included:

  • Setting their own schedule
  • Lack of dress code
  • More time for house chores
  • Being less distracted by coworkers.


These workers found many benefits to working from home, but loneliness and a lack of socialization took a toll on some, and this affected their willingness to return to the office. The amount of social contact in a person's life outside of life affected their experience.

What percentage of employees want to work remotely?

In researching these statistics, differences were found among the studies. It is not known if the company or work environment was to blame or if culture and location played a role. A U.K. study found that 88% of employee want to continue working remotely at least part-time.

A recent study in the U.S. found that approximately 38% would like to continue working from home. Workers also reported that they are slightly happier when working from home as compared to a year ago. The question is what conclusion can be drawn from this with such a wide gap in results.

Some smaller studies in the U.S. reported that as many as 99% of workers in the U.S. wanted to continue to work from home. These differences in opinion seem to point to the effect of errors in sampling. In other words, the answer that you get depends on who you ask.

10 Important Remote Workers Happiness Statistics

employees are willing to make sacrifices for the ability to work remotely
  1. Nearly 13% of remote workers reported that they were more likely to stay at their current job for the next five years when compared to those who worked in the office.
  2. Approximately 80% of all workers in a recent survey said that they would reject a job that does not offer the ability to work from home and flexible hours.
  3. Employees said they were willing to make some sacrifices for the ability to work remotely, such as taking on a greater workload, paying for their own technology, giving up company benefits, and taking a pay cut or demotion
  4. Improved work-life balance was the number one reason why workers chose jobs that allowed them to work remotely.
  5. Some of the top reasons, besides work-life balance, why people chose to work remotely were improved productivity, avoiding commuting, less stress, saving money, childcare responsibilities, accommodating a disability, moving home, no company office, and eldercare responsibilities.
  6. Nearly 77% of remote workers reported an improvement in their wellbeing and overall health status.
  7. A study found that 80% of remote workers said they were happy with their job compared to only 55% of those in a traditional office setting.
  8. Having a choice in working location was found to be more important than having a more prestigious role or working for a more prestigious company.
  9. A study found that 61% of all workers have left or considered leaving a job due to a lack of flexibility.
  10. Among the downsides to working at home were loneliness (19%) and the inability to “switch off” after the work is done (22%).

downsides to remote working

Key Takeaway: The bottom line is that workers place a high value on the ability to choose where they do their work. They report improved health and better happiness. We know that these factors have an impact on the competitive advantage of the company.

remote workers would reject a job offer that is not flexible

Happiness in the workplace leads to greater productivity, lower absentee rates, and a desire to stay with an employer for a longer period.

These statistics are important for companies who want to use their workforce to their greatest advantage.

remote workers are happier with their job

Now, we have the company perspective on the effects of working from home. The workplace is changing and taking new forms that range from 100% remote work to a hybrid of remote and office work.

In the past, working from home was a popular fantasy that many shared, but how does working from home in your pajamas sound after over a year of doing it?

After facing the realities of working from home, are workers happy, or are they looking forward to going back to the office?

Are remote workers happier?

A growing body of research says that working from home makes people happier. Here are some of the positive effects that workers reported from working from home.

  • Decreased work-related stress
  • Better work-life balance
  • Opportunities for exercise and better diet
  • Increased focus and productivity
  • Freedom to move around and take breaks


These factors tell us why people prefer working from home, but they also tell us what people do not like about working from the office. It can also give companies clues as to how they can make working from the office more attractive in the future.

It is well-established in the field of industrial psychology that there is a positive connection between happiness and productivity.

It has also been found that real-world shocks and stress lower productivity. Happier, less stressed workers are more productive, which could account for some of the productivity increases found earlier in these statistics.

Does working from home make you happy?

A 2020 U.K. study found that 75% of the 2,000 workers surveyed said they were happier working from home.

Of them, 53% said that choosing where they work was having a positive effect on them. Other positive aspects of working from home included:

  • Setting their own schedule
  • Lack of dress code
  • More time for house chores
  • Being less distracted by coworkers.


These workers found many benefits to working from home, but loneliness and a lack of socialization took a toll on some, and this affected their willingness to return to the office. The amount of social contact in a person's life outside of life affected their experience.

What percentage of employees want to work remotely?

In researching these statistics, differences were found among the studies. It is not known if the company or work environment was to blame or if culture and location played a role. A U.K. study found that 88% of employee want to continue working remotely at least part-time.

A recent study in the U.S. found that approximately 38% would like to continue working from home. Workers also reported that they are slightly happier when working from home as compared to a year ago. The question is what conclusion can be drawn from this with such a wide gap in results.

Some smaller studies in the U.S. reported that as many as 99% of workers in the U.S. wanted to continue to work from home. These differences in opinion seem to point to the effect of errors in sampling. In other words, the answer that you get depends on who you ask.

10 Important Remote Workers Happiness Statistics

employees are willing to make sacrifices for the ability to work remotely
  1. Nearly 13% of remote workers reported that they were more likely to stay at their current job for the next five years when compared to those who worked in the office.
  2. Approximately 80% of all workers in a recent survey said that they would reject a job that does not offer the ability to work from home and flexible hours.
  3. Employees said they were willing to make some sacrifices for the ability to work remotely, such as taking on a greater workload, paying for their own technology, giving up company benefits, and taking a pay cut or demotion
  4. Improved work-life balance was the number one reason why workers chose jobs that allowed them to work remotely.
  5. Some of the top reasons, besides work-life balance, why people chose to work remotely were improved productivity, avoiding commuting, less stress, saving money, childcare responsibilities, accommodating a disability, moving home, no company office, and eldercare responsibilities.
  6. Nearly 77% of remote workers reported an improvement in their wellbeing and overall health status.
  7. A study found that 80% of remote workers said they were happy with their job compared to only 55% of those in a traditional office setting.
  8. Having a choice in working location was found to be more important than having a more prestigious role or working for a more prestigious company.
  9. A study found that 61% of all workers have left or considered leaving a job due to a lack of flexibility.
  10. Among the downsides to working at home were loneliness (19%) and the inability to “switch off” after the work is done (22%).

downsides to remote working

Key Takeaway: The bottom line is that workers place a high value on the ability to choose where they do their work. They report improved health and better happiness. We know that these factors have an impact on the competitive advantage of the company.

remote workers would reject a job offer that is not flexible

Happiness in the workplace leads to greater productivity, lower absentee rates, and a desire to stay with an employer for a longer period.

These statistics are important for companies who want to use their workforce to their greatest advantage.

remote workers are happier with their job

Now, we have the company perspective on the effects of working from home. The workplace is changing and taking new forms that range from 100% remote work to a hybrid of remote and office work.

In the past, working from home was a popular fantasy that many shared, but how does working from home in your pajamas sound after over a year of doing it?

After facing the realities of working from home, are workers happy, or are they looking forward to going back to the office?

Are remote workers happier?

A growing body of research says that working from home makes people happier. Here are some of the positive effects that workers reported from working from home.

  • Decreased work-related stress
  • Better work-life balance
  • Opportunities for exercise and better diet
  • Increased focus and productivity
  • Freedom to move around and take breaks


These factors tell us why people prefer working from home, but they also tell us what people do not like about working from the office. It can also give companies clues as to how they can make working from the office more attractive in the future.

It is well-established in the field of industrial psychology that there is a positive connection between happiness and productivity.

It has also been found that real-world shocks and stress lower productivity. Happier, less stressed workers are more productive, which could account for some of the productivity increases found earlier in these statistics.

Does working from home make you happy?

A 2020 U.K. study found that 75% of the 2,000 workers surveyed said they were happier working from home.

Of them, 53% said that choosing where they work was having a positive effect on them. Other positive aspects of working from home included:

  • Setting their own schedule
  • Lack of dress code
  • More time for house chores
  • Being less distracted by coworkers.


These workers found many benefits to working from home, but loneliness and a lack of socialization took a toll on some, and this affected their willingness to return to the office. The amount of social contact in a person's life outside of life affected their experience.

What percentage of employees want to work remotely?

In researching these statistics, differences were found among the studies. It is not known if the company or work environment was to blame or if culture and location played a role. A U.K. study found that 88% of employee want to continue working remotely at least part-time.

A recent study in the U.S. found that approximately 38% would like to continue working from home. Workers also reported that they are slightly happier when working from home as compared to a year ago. The question is what conclusion can be drawn from this with such a wide gap in results.

Some smaller studies in the U.S. reported that as many as 99% of workers in the U.S. wanted to continue to work from home. These differences in opinion seem to point to the effect of errors in sampling. In other words, the answer that you get depends on who you ask.

10 Important Remote Workers Happiness Statistics

employees are willing to make sacrifices for the ability to work remotely
  1. Nearly 13% of remote workers reported that they were more likely to stay at their current job for the next five years when compared to those who worked in the office.
  2. Approximately 80% of all workers in a recent survey said that they would reject a job that does not offer the ability to work from home and flexible hours.
  3. Employees said they were willing to make some sacrifices for the ability to work remotely, such as taking on a greater workload, paying for their own technology, giving up company benefits, and taking a pay cut or demotion
  4. Improved work-life balance was the number one reason why workers chose jobs that allowed them to work remotely.
  5. Some of the top reasons, besides work-life balance, why people chose to work remotely were improved productivity, avoiding commuting, less stress, saving money, childcare responsibilities, accommodating a disability, moving home, no company office, and eldercare responsibilities.
  6. Nearly 77% of remote workers reported an improvement in their wellbeing and overall health status.
  7. A study found that 80% of remote workers said they were happy with their job compared to only 55% of those in a traditional office setting.
  8. Having a choice in working location was found to be more important than having a more prestigious role or working for a more prestigious company.
  9. A study found that 61% of all workers have left or considered leaving a job due to a lack of flexibility.
  10. Among the downsides to working at home were loneliness (19%) and the inability to “switch off” after the work is done (22%).

downsides to remote working

Key Takeaway: The bottom line is that workers place a high value on the ability to choose where they do their work. They report improved health and better happiness. We know that these factors have an impact on the competitive advantage of the company.

remote workers would reject a job offer that is not flexible

Happiness in the workplace leads to greater productivity, lower absentee rates, and a desire to stay with an employer for a longer period.

These statistics are important for companies who want to use their workforce to their greatest advantage.

remote workers are happier with their job

Now, we have the company perspective on the effects of working from home. The workplace is changing and taking new forms that range from 100% remote work to a hybrid of remote and office work.

In the past, working from home was a popular fantasy that many shared, but how does working from home in your pajamas sound after over a year of doing it?

After facing the realities of working from home, are workers happy, or are they looking forward to going back to the office?

Are remote workers happier?

A growing body of research says that working from home makes people happier. Here are some of the positive effects that workers reported from working from home.

  • Decreased work-related stress
  • Better work-life balance
  • Opportunities for exercise and better diet
  • Increased focus and productivity
  • Freedom to move around and take breaks


These factors tell us why people prefer working from home, but they also tell us what people do not like about working from the office. It can also give companies clues as to how they can make working from the office more attractive in the future.

It is well-established in the field of industrial psychology that there is a positive connection between happiness and productivity.

It has also been found that real-world shocks and stress lower productivity. Happier, less stressed workers are more productive, which could account for some of the productivity increases found earlier in these statistics.

Does working from home make you happy?

A 2020 U.K. study found that 75% of the 2,000 workers surveyed said they were happier working from home.

Of them, 53% said that choosing where they work was having a positive effect on them. Other positive aspects of working from home included:

  • Setting their own schedule
  • Lack of dress code
  • More time for house chores
  • Being less distracted by coworkers.


These workers found many benefits to working from home, but loneliness and a lack of socialization took a toll on some, and this affected their willingness to return to the office. The amount of social contact in a person's life outside of life affected their experience.

What percentage of employees want to work remotely?

In researching these statistics, differences were found among the studies. It is not known if the company or work environment was to blame or if culture and location played a role. A U.K. study found that 88% of employee want to continue working remotely at least part-time.

A recent study in the U.S. found that approximately 38% would like to continue working from home. Workers also reported that they are slightly happier when working from home as compared to a year ago. The question is what conclusion can be drawn from this with such a wide gap in results.

Some smaller studies in the U.S. reported that as many as 99% of workers in the U.S. wanted to continue to work from home. These differences in opinion seem to point to the effect of errors in sampling. In other words, the answer that you get depends on who you ask.

10 Important Remote Workers Happiness Statistics

employees are willing to make sacrifices for the ability to work remotely
  1. Nearly 13% of remote workers reported that they were more likely to stay at their current job for the next five years when compared to those who worked in the office.
  2. Approximately 80% of all workers in a recent survey said that they would reject a job that does not offer the ability to work from home and flexible hours.
  3. Employees said they were willing to make some sacrifices for the ability to work remotely, such as taking on a greater workload, paying for their own technology, giving up company benefits, and taking a pay cut or demotion
  4. Improved work-life balance was the number one reason why workers chose jobs that allowed them to work remotely.
  5. Some of the top reasons, besides work-life balance, why people chose to work remotely were improved productivity, avoiding commuting, less stress, saving money, childcare responsibilities, accommodating a disability, moving home, no company office, and eldercare responsibilities.
  6. Nearly 77% of remote workers reported an improvement in their wellbeing and overall health status.
  7. A study found that 80% of remote workers said they were happy with their job compared to only 55% of those in a traditional office setting.
  8. Having a choice in working location was found to be more important than having a more prestigious role or working for a more prestigious company.
  9. A study found that 61% of all workers have left or considered leaving a job due to a lack of flexibility.
  10. Among the downsides to working at home were loneliness (19%) and the inability to “switch off” after the work is done (22%).

downsides to remote working

Key Takeaway: The bottom line is that workers place a high value on the ability to choose where they do their work. They report improved health and better happiness. We know that these factors have an impact on the competitive advantage of the company.

remote workers would reject a job offer that is not flexible

Happiness in the workplace leads to greater productivity, lower absentee rates, and a desire to stay with an employer for a longer period.

These statistics are important for companies who want to use their workforce to their greatest advantage.

remote workers are happier with their job

Now, we have the company perspective on the effects of working from home. The workplace is changing and taking new forms that range from 100% remote work to a hybrid of remote and office work.

In the past, working from home was a popular fantasy that many shared, but how does working from home in your pajamas sound after over a year of doing it?

After facing the realities of working from home, are workers happy, or are they looking forward to going back to the office?

Are remote workers happier?

A growing body of research says that working from home makes people happier. Here are some of the positive effects that workers reported from working from home.

  • Decreased work-related stress
  • Better work-life balance
  • Opportunities for exercise and better diet
  • Increased focus and productivity
  • Freedom to move around and take breaks


These factors tell us why people prefer working from home, but they also tell us what people do not like about working from the office. It can also give companies clues as to how they can make working from the office more attractive in the future.

It is well-established in the field of industrial psychology that there is a positive connection between happiness and productivity.

It has also been found that real-world shocks and stress lower productivity. Happier, less stressed workers are more productive, which could account for some of the productivity increases found earlier in these statistics.

Does working from home make you happy?

A 2020 U.K. study found that 75% of the 2,000 workers surveyed said they were happier working from home.

Of them, 53% said that choosing where they work was having a positive effect on them. Other positive aspects of working from home included:

  • Setting their own schedule
  • Lack of dress code
  • More time for house chores
  • Being less distracted by coworkers.


These workers found many benefits to working from home, but loneliness and a lack of socialization took a toll on some, and this affected their willingness to return to the office. The amount of social contact in a person's life outside of life affected their experience.

What percentage of employees want to work remotely?

In researching these statistics, differences were found among the studies. It is not known if the company or work environment was to blame or if culture and location played a role. A U.K. study found that 88% of employee want to continue working remotely at least part-time.

A recent study in the U.S. found that approximately 38% would like to continue working from home. Workers also reported that they are slightly happier when working from home as compared to a year ago. The question is what conclusion can be drawn from this with such a wide gap in results.

Some smaller studies in the U.S. reported that as many as 99% of workers in the U.S. wanted to continue to work from home. These differences in opinion seem to point to the effect of errors in sampling. In other words, the answer that you get depends on who you ask.

10 Important Remote Workers Happiness Statistics

employees are willing to make sacrifices for the ability to work remotely
  1. Nearly 13% of remote workers reported that they were more likely to stay at their current job for the next five years when compared to those who worked in the office.
  2. Approximately 80% of all workers in a recent survey said that they would reject a job that does not offer the ability to work from home and flexible hours.
  3. Employees said they were willing to make some sacrifices for the ability to work remotely, such as taking on a greater workload, paying for their own technology, giving up company benefits, and taking a pay cut or demotion
  4. Improved work-life balance was the number one reason why workers chose jobs that allowed them to work remotely.
  5. Some of the top reasons, besides work-life balance, why people chose to work remotely were improved productivity, avoiding commuting, less stress, saving money, childcare responsibilities, accommodating a disability, moving home, no company office, and eldercare responsibilities.
  6. Nearly 77% of remote workers reported an improvement in their wellbeing and overall health status.
  7. A study found that 80% of remote workers said they were happy with their job compared to only 55% of those in a traditional office setting.
  8. Having a choice in working location was found to be more important than having a more prestigious role or working for a more prestigious company.
  9. A study found that 61% of all workers have left or considered leaving a job due to a lack of flexibility.
  10. Among the downsides to working at home were loneliness (19%) and the inability to “switch off” after the work is done (22%).

downsides to remote working

Key Takeaway: The bottom line is that workers place a high value on the ability to choose where they do their work. They report improved health and better happiness. We know that these factors have an impact on the competitive advantage of the company.

remote workers would reject a job offer that is not flexible

Happiness in the workplace leads to greater productivity, lower absentee rates, and a desire to stay with an employer for a longer period.

These statistics are important for companies who want to use their workforce to their greatest advantage.

remote workers are happier with their job

Now, we have the company perspective on the effects of working from home. The workplace is changing and taking new forms that range from 100% remote work to a hybrid of remote and office work.

In the past, working from home was a popular fantasy that many shared, but how does working from home in your pajamas sound after over a year of doing it?

After facing the realities of working from home, are workers happy, or are they looking forward to going back to the office?

Are remote workers happier?

A growing body of research says that working from home makes people happier. Here are some of the positive effects that workers reported from working from home.

  • Decreased work-related stress
  • Better work-life balance
  • Opportunities for exercise and better diet
  • Increased focus and productivity
  • Freedom to move around and take breaks


These factors tell us why people prefer working from home, but they also tell us what people do not like about working from the office. It can also give companies clues as to how they can make working from the office more attractive in the future.

It is well-established in the field of industrial psychology that there is a positive connection between happiness and productivity.

It has also been found that real-world shocks and stress lower productivity. Happier, less stressed workers are more productive, which could account for some of the productivity increases found earlier in these statistics.

Does working from home make you happy?

A 2020 U.K. study found that 75% of the 2,000 workers surveyed said they were happier working from home.

Of them, 53% said that choosing where they work was having a positive effect on them. Other positive aspects of working from home included:

  • Setting their own schedule
  • Lack of dress code
  • More time for house chores
  • Being less distracted by coworkers.


These workers found many benefits to working from home, but loneliness and a lack of socialization took a toll on some, and this affected their willingness to return to the office. The amount of social contact in a person's life outside of life affected their experience.

What percentage of employees want to work remotely?

In researching these statistics, differences were found among the studies. It is not known if the company or work environment was to blame or if culture and location played a role. A U.K. study found that 88% of employee want to continue working remotely at least part-time.

A recent study in the U.S. found that approximately 38% would like to continue working from home. Workers also reported that they are slightly happier when working from home as compared to a year ago. The question is what conclusion can be drawn from this with such a wide gap in results.

Some smaller studies in the U.S. reported that as many as 99% of workers in the U.S. wanted to continue to work from home. These differences in opinion seem to point to the effect of errors in sampling. In other words, the answer that you get depends on who you ask.

10 Important Remote Workers Happiness Statistics

employees are willing to make sacrifices for the ability to work remotely
  1. Nearly 13% of remote workers reported that they were more likely to stay at their current job for the next five years when compared to those who worked in the office.
  2. Approximately 80% of all workers in a recent survey said that they would reject a job that does not offer the ability to work from home and flexible hours.
  3. Employees said they were willing to make some sacrifices for the ability to work remotely, such as taking on a greater workload, paying for their own technology, giving up company benefits, and taking a pay cut or demotion
  4. Improved work-life balance was the number one reason why workers chose jobs that allowed them to work remotely.
  5. Some of the top reasons, besides work-life balance, why people chose to work remotely were improved productivity, avoiding commuting, less stress, saving money, childcare responsibilities, accommodating a disability, moving home, no company office, and eldercare responsibilities.
  6. Nearly 77% of remote workers reported an improvement in their wellbeing and overall health status.
  7. A study found that 80% of remote workers said they were happy with their job compared to only 55% of those in a traditional office setting.
  8. Having a choice in working location was found to be more important than having a more prestigious role or working for a more prestigious company.
  9. A study found that 61% of all workers have left or considered leaving a job due to a lack of flexibility.
  10. Among the downsides to working at home were loneliness (19%) and the inability to “switch off” after the work is done (22%).

downsides to remote working

Key Takeaway: The bottom line is that workers place a high value on the ability to choose where they do their work. They report improved health and better happiness. We know that these factors have an impact on the competitive advantage of the company.

remote workers would reject a job offer that is not flexible

Happiness in the workplace leads to greater productivity, lower absentee rates, and a desire to stay with an employer for a longer period.

These statistics are important for companies who want to use their workforce to their greatest advantage.

remote workers are happier with their job

Now, we have the company perspective on the effects of working from home. The workplace is changing and taking new forms that range from 100% remote work to a hybrid of remote and office work.

In the past, working from home was a popular fantasy that many shared, but how does working from home in your pajamas sound after over a year of doing it?

After facing the realities of working from home, are workers happy, or are they looking forward to going back to the office?

Are remote workers happier?

A growing body of research says that working from home makes people happier. Here are some of the positive effects that workers reported from working from home.

  • Decreased work-related stress
  • Better work-life balance
  • Opportunities for exercise and better diet
  • Increased focus and productivity
  • Freedom to move around and take breaks


These factors tell us why people prefer working from home, but they also tell us what people do not like about working from the office. It can also give companies clues as to how they can make working from the office more attractive in the future.

It is well-established in the field of industrial psychology that there is a positive connection between happiness and productivity.

It has also been found that real-world shocks and stress lower productivity. Happier, less stressed workers are more productive, which could account for some of the productivity increases found earlier in these statistics.

Does working from home make you happy?

A 2020 U.K. study found that 75% of the 2,000 workers surveyed said they were happier working from home.

Of them, 53% said that choosing where they work was having a positive effect on them. Other positive aspects of working from home included:

  • Setting their own schedule
  • Lack of dress code
  • More time for house chores
  • Being less distracted by coworkers.


These workers found many benefits to working from home, but loneliness and a lack of socialization took a toll on some, and this affected their willingness to return to the office. The amount of social contact in a person's life outside of life affected their experience.

What percentage of employees want to work remotely?

In researching these statistics, differences were found among the studies. It is not known if the company or work environment was to blame or if culture and location played a role. A U.K. study found that 88% of employee want to continue working remotely at least part-time.

A recent study in the U.S. found that approximately 38% would like to continue working from home. Workers also reported that they are slightly happier when working from home as compared to a year ago. The question is what conclusion can be drawn from this with such a wide gap in results.

Some smaller studies in the U.S. reported that as many as 99% of workers in the U.S. wanted to continue to work from home. These differences in opinion seem to point to the effect of errors in sampling. In other words, the answer that you get depends on who you ask.

10 Important Remote Workers Happiness Statistics

employees are willing to make sacrifices for the ability to work remotely
  1. Nearly 13% of remote workers reported that they were more likely to stay at their current job for the next five years when compared to those who worked in the office.
  2. Approximately 80% of all workers in a recent survey said that they would reject a job that does not offer the ability to work from home and flexible hours.
  3. Employees said they were willing to make some sacrifices for the ability to work remotely, such as taking on a greater workload, paying for their own technology, giving up company benefits, and taking a pay cut or demotion
  4. Improved work-life balance was the number one reason why workers chose jobs that allowed them to work remotely.
  5. Some of the top reasons, besides work-life balance, why people chose to work remotely were improved productivity, avoiding commuting, less stress, saving money, childcare responsibilities, accommodating a disability, moving home, no company office, and eldercare responsibilities.
  6. Nearly 77% of remote workers reported an improvement in their wellbeing and overall health status.
  7. A study found that 80% of remote workers said they were happy with their job compared to only 55% of those in a traditional office setting.
  8. Having a choice in working location was found to be more important than having a more prestigious role or working for a more prestigious company.
  9. A study found that 61% of all workers have left or considered leaving a job due to a lack of flexibility.
  10. Among the downsides to working at home were loneliness (19%) and the inability to “switch off” after the work is done (22%).

downsides to remote working

Key Takeaway: The bottom line is that workers place a high value on the ability to choose where they do their work. They report improved health and better happiness. We know that these factors have an impact on the competitive advantage of the company.

remote workers would reject a job offer that is not flexible

Happiness in the workplace leads to greater productivity, lower absentee rates, and a desire to stay with an employer for a longer period.

These statistics are important for companies who want to use their workforce to their greatest advantage.

remote workers are happier with their job

Now, we have the company perspective on the effects of working from home. The workplace is changing and taking new forms that range from 100% remote work to a hybrid of remote and office work.

In the past, working from home was a popular fantasy that many shared, but how does working from home in your pajamas sound after over a year of doing it?

After facing the realities of working from home, are workers happy, or are they looking forward to going back to the office?

Are remote workers happier?

A growing body of research says that working from home makes people happier. Here are some of the positive effects that workers reported from working from home.

  • Decreased work-related stress
  • Better work-life balance
  • Opportunities for exercise and better diet
  • Increased focus and productivity
  • Freedom to move around and take breaks


These factors tell us why people prefer working from home, but they also tell us what people do not like about working from the office. It can also give companies clues as to how they can make working from the office more attractive in the future.

It is well-established in the field of industrial psychology that there is a positive connection between happiness and productivity.

It has also been found that real-world shocks and stress lower productivity. Happier, less stressed workers are more productive, which could account for some of the productivity increases found earlier in these statistics.

Does working from home make you happy?

A 2020 U.K. study found that 75% of the 2,000 workers surveyed said they were happier working from home.

Of them, 53% said that choosing where they work was having a positive effect on them. Other positive aspects of working from home included:

  • Setting their own schedule
  • Lack of dress code
  • More time for house chores
  • Being less distracted by coworkers.


These workers found many benefits to working from home, but loneliness and a lack of socialization took a toll on some, and this affected their willingness to return to the office. The amount of social contact in a person's life outside of life affected their experience.

What percentage of employees want to work remotely?

In researching these statistics, differences were found among the studies. It is not known if the company or work environment was to blame or if culture and location played a role. A U.K. study found that 88% of employee want to continue working remotely at least part-time.

A recent study in the U.S. found that approximately 38% would like to continue working from home. Workers also reported that they are slightly happier when working from home as compared to a year ago. The question is what conclusion can be drawn from this with such a wide gap in results.

Some smaller studies in the U.S. reported that as many as 99% of workers in the U.S. wanted to continue to work from home. These differences in opinion seem to point to the effect of errors in sampling. In other words, the answer that you get depends on who you ask.

10 Important Remote Workers Happiness Statistics

employees are willing to make sacrifices for the ability to work remotely
  1. Nearly 13% of remote workers reported that they were more likely to stay at their current job for the next five years when compared to those who worked in the office.
  2. Approximately 80% of all workers in a recent survey said that they would reject a job that does not offer the ability to work from home and flexible hours.
  3. Employees said they were willing to make some sacrifices for the ability to work remotely, such as taking on a greater workload, paying for their own technology, giving up company benefits, and taking a pay cut or demotion
  4. Improved work-life balance was the number one reason why workers chose jobs that allowed them to work remotely.
  5. Some of the top reasons, besides work-life balance, why people chose to work remotely were improved productivity, avoiding commuting, less stress, saving money, childcare responsibilities, accommodating a disability, moving home, no company office, and eldercare responsibilities.
  6. Nearly 77% of remote workers reported an improvement in their wellbeing and overall health status.
  7. A study found that 80% of remote workers said they were happy with their job compared to only 55% of those in a traditional office setting.
  8. Having a choice in working location was found to be more important than having a more prestigious role or working for a more prestigious company.
  9. A study found that 61% of all workers have left or considered leaving a job due to a lack of flexibility.
  10. Among the downsides to working at home were loneliness (19%) and the inability to “switch off” after the work is done (22%).

downsides to remote working

Key Takeaway: The bottom line is that workers place a high value on the ability to choose where they do their work. They report improved health and better happiness. We know that these factors have an impact on the competitive advantage of the company.

remote workers would reject a job offer that is not flexible

Happiness in the workplace leads to greater productivity, lower absentee rates, and a desire to stay with an employer for a longer period.

These statistics are important for companies who want to use their workforce to their greatest advantage.

remote workers are happier with their job

Now, we have the company perspective on the effects of working from home. The workplace is changing and taking new forms that range from 100% remote work to a hybrid of remote and office work.

In the past, working from home was a popular fantasy that many shared, but how does working from home in your pajamas sound after over a year of doing it?

After facing the realities of working from home, are workers happy, or are they looking forward to going back to the office?

Are remote workers happier?

A growing body of research says that working from home makes people happier. Here are some of the positive effects that workers reported from working from home.

  • Decreased work-related stress
  • Better work-life balance
  • Opportunities for exercise and better diet
  • Increased focus and productivity
  • Freedom to move around and take breaks


These factors tell us why people prefer working from home, but they also tell us what people do not like about working from the office. It can also give companies clues as to how they can make working from the office more attractive in the future.

It is well-established in the field of industrial psychology that there is a positive connection between happiness and productivity.

It has also been found that real-world shocks and stress lower productivity. Happier, less stressed workers are more productive, which could account for some of the productivity increases found earlier in these statistics.

Does working from home make you happy?

A 2020 U.K. study found that 75% of the 2,000 workers surveyed said they were happier working from home.

Of them, 53% said that choosing where they work was having a positive effect on them. Other positive aspects of working from home included:

  • Setting their own schedule
  • Lack of dress code
  • More time for house chores
  • Being less distracted by coworkers.


These workers found many benefits to working from home, but loneliness and a lack of socialization took a toll on some, and this affected their willingness to return to the office. The amount of social contact in a person's life outside of life affected their experience.

What percentage of employees want to work remotely?

In researching these statistics, differences were found among the studies. It is not known if the company or work environment was to blame or if culture and location played a role. A U.K. study found that 88% of employee want to continue working remotely at least part-time.

A recent study in the U.S. found that approximately 38% would like to continue working from home. Workers also reported that they are slightly happier when working from home as compared to a year ago. The question is what conclusion can be drawn from this with such a wide gap in results.

Some smaller studies in the U.S. reported that as many as 99% of workers in the U.S. wanted to continue to work from home. These differences in opinion seem to point to the effect of errors in sampling. In other words, the answer that you get depends on who you ask.

10 Important Remote Workers Happiness Statistics

employees are willing to make sacrifices for the ability to work remotely
  1. Nearly 13% of remote workers reported that they were more likely to stay at their current job for the next five years when compared to those who worked in the office.
  2. Approximately 80% of all workers in a recent survey said that they would reject a job that does not offer the ability to work from home and flexible hours.
  3. Employees said they were willing to make some sacrifices for the ability to work remotely, such as taking on a greater workload, paying for their own technology, giving up company benefits, and taking a pay cut or demotion
  4. Improved work-life balance was the number one reason why workers chose jobs that allowed them to work remotely.
  5. Some of the top reasons, besides work-life balance, why people chose to work remotely were improved productivity, avoiding commuting, less stress, saving money, childcare responsibilities, accommodating a disability, moving home, no company office, and eldercare responsibilities.
  6. Nearly 77% of remote workers reported an improvement in their wellbeing and overall health status.
  7. A study found that 80% of remote workers said they were happy with their job compared to only 55% of those in a traditional office setting.
  8. Having a choice in working location was found to be more important than having a more prestigious role or working for a more prestigious company.
  9. A study found that 61% of all workers have left or considered leaving a job due to a lack of flexibility.
  10. Among the downsides to working at home were loneliness (19%) and the inability to “switch off” after the work is done (22%).

downsides to remote working

Key Takeaway: The bottom line is that workers place a high value on the ability to choose where they do their work. They report improved health and better happiness. We know that these factors have an impact on the competitive advantage of the company.

remote workers would reject a job offer that is not flexible

Happiness in the workplace leads to greater productivity, lower absentee rates, and a desire to stay with an employer for a longer period.

These statistics are important for companies who want to use their workforce to their greatest advantage.

remote workers are happier with their job
Chapter 5

Remote Work Statistics Before and After COVID-19

How much has COVID-19 increased remote working around the world? What impact did it have on remote working? Keep reading to find out.

Working from home was one of the biggest headlines during the pandemic.

We have already found that working from home was on the increase before the pandemic, but that only represented a small portion of the workforce.

How much did COVID-19 increase remote working?

A study by the Bureau of Labor Statistics found that 82% of all people who were employed did some or all of their work from home.

Other studies said that it was only 3%, and it went up to 40% during the pandemic. With these types of discrepancies, it is difficult to say how the exact impact of COVID-19 with any certainty.

Most studies do agree that the number of those working from home increased due to the pandemic.

One factor that could account for these differences is whether this only includes those employed in a traditional office setting or whether it includes the growing number of entrepreneurs in the nation.

What impact did COVID-19 have on remote working?

Even though it is difficult to quantify how many additional people are now working from home due to the pandemic, it is apparent that a shift has occurred in attitudes about working from home.

Many companies who once thought this was a bad idea, or that it was not possible, have now embraced the concept and are choosing it as a permanent option. Some companies found that they could save considerably in operating costs, salaries, and have increased productivity.

A large number of workers have found that they like working from home, and they now demand it as an option.

Compared to before COVID-19, 81% of survey respondents felt that their employer would support working from home, and 29% thought their company would support it more than before the pandemic.

Some companies will go back to the way things were before the pandemic and mandate that their workers return to the office, but many will embrace the new way of working and the needs of workers who have discovered a new way of looking at life and work.

Key Takeaway: The greatest change in the workforce because of the pandemic is a change in attitudes about the credibility of those who choose to work from home. Many employers were forced to make shifts and find a way to make it work.

Many of them found that it was an excellent option and plan to continue to allow it, and some now prefer it. Among workers, the changes are clear, and they found many benefits to working from home, including the ability to manage child and elder care, a better work-life balance, and greater levels of happiness.

Working from home was one of the biggest headlines during the pandemic.

We have already found that working from home was on the increase before the pandemic, but that only represented a small portion of the workforce.

How much did COVID-19 increase remote working?

A study by the Bureau of Labor Statistics found that 82% of all people who were employed did some or all of their work from home.

Other studies said that it was only 3%, and it went up to 40% during the pandemic. With these types of discrepancies, it is difficult to say how the exact impact of COVID-19 with any certainty.

Most studies do agree that the number of those working from home increased due to the pandemic.

One factor that could account for these differences is whether this only includes those employed in a traditional office setting or whether it includes the growing number of entrepreneurs in the nation.

What impact did COVID-19 have on remote working?

Even though it is difficult to quantify how many additional people are now working from home due to the pandemic, it is apparent that a shift has occurred in attitudes about working from home.

Many companies who once thought this was a bad idea, or that it was not possible, have now embraced the concept and are choosing it as a permanent option. Some companies found that they could save considerably in operating costs, salaries, and have increased productivity.

A large number of workers have found that they like working from home, and they now demand it as an option.

Compared to before COVID-19, 81% of survey respondents felt that their employer would support working from home, and 29% thought their company would support it more than before the pandemic.

Some companies will go back to the way things were before the pandemic and mandate that their workers return to the office, but many will embrace the new way of working and the needs of workers who have discovered a new way of looking at life and work.

Key Takeaway: The greatest change in the workforce because of the pandemic is a change in attitudes about the credibility of those who choose to work from home. Many employers were forced to make shifts and find a way to make it work.

Many of them found that it was an excellent option and plan to continue to allow it, and some now prefer it. Among workers, the changes are clear, and they found many benefits to working from home, including the ability to manage child and elder care, a better work-life balance, and greater levels of happiness.

Working from home was one of the biggest headlines during the pandemic.

We have already found that working from home was on the increase before the pandemic, but that only represented a small portion of the workforce.

How much did COVID-19 increase remote working?

A study by the Bureau of Labor Statistics found that 82% of all people who were employed did some or all of their work from home.

Other studies said that it was only 3%, and it went up to 40% during the pandemic. With these types of discrepancies, it is difficult to say how the exact impact of COVID-19 with any certainty.

Most studies do agree that the number of those working from home increased due to the pandemic.

One factor that could account for these differences is whether this only includes those employed in a traditional office setting or whether it includes the growing number of entrepreneurs in the nation.

What impact did COVID-19 have on remote working?

Even though it is difficult to quantify how many additional people are now working from home due to the pandemic, it is apparent that a shift has occurred in attitudes about working from home.

Many companies who once thought this was a bad idea, or that it was not possible, have now embraced the concept and are choosing it as a permanent option. Some companies found that they could save considerably in operating costs, salaries, and have increased productivity.

A large number of workers have found that they like working from home, and they now demand it as an option.

Compared to before COVID-19, 81% of survey respondents felt that their employer would support working from home, and 29% thought their company would support it more than before the pandemic.

Some companies will go back to the way things were before the pandemic and mandate that their workers return to the office, but many will embrace the new way of working and the needs of workers who have discovered a new way of looking at life and work.

Key Takeaway: The greatest change in the workforce because of the pandemic is a change in attitudes about the credibility of those who choose to work from home. Many employers were forced to make shifts and find a way to make it work.

Many of them found that it was an excellent option and plan to continue to allow it, and some now prefer it. Among workers, the changes are clear, and they found many benefits to working from home, including the ability to manage child and elder care, a better work-life balance, and greater levels of happiness.

Working from home was one of the biggest headlines during the pandemic.

We have already found that working from home was on the increase before the pandemic, but that only represented a small portion of the workforce.

How much did COVID-19 increase remote working?

A study by the Bureau of Labor Statistics found that 82% of all people who were employed did some or all of their work from home.

Other studies said that it was only 3%, and it went up to 40% during the pandemic. With these types of discrepancies, it is difficult to say how the exact impact of COVID-19 with any certainty.

Most studies do agree that the number of those working from home increased due to the pandemic.

One factor that could account for these differences is whether this only includes those employed in a traditional office setting or whether it includes the growing number of entrepreneurs in the nation.

What impact did COVID-19 have on remote working?

Even though it is difficult to quantify how many additional people are now working from home due to the pandemic, it is apparent that a shift has occurred in attitudes about working from home.

Many companies who once thought this was a bad idea, or that it was not possible, have now embraced the concept and are choosing it as a permanent option. Some companies found that they could save considerably in operating costs, salaries, and have increased productivity.

A large number of workers have found that they like working from home, and they now demand it as an option.

Compared to before COVID-19, 81% of survey respondents felt that their employer would support working from home, and 29% thought their company would support it more than before the pandemic.

Some companies will go back to the way things were before the pandemic and mandate that their workers return to the office, but many will embrace the new way of working and the needs of workers who have discovered a new way of looking at life and work.

Key Takeaway: The greatest change in the workforce because of the pandemic is a change in attitudes about the credibility of those who choose to work from home. Many employers were forced to make shifts and find a way to make it work.

Many of them found that it was an excellent option and plan to continue to allow it, and some now prefer it. Among workers, the changes are clear, and they found many benefits to working from home, including the ability to manage child and elder care, a better work-life balance, and greater levels of happiness.

Working from home was one of the biggest headlines during the pandemic.

We have already found that working from home was on the increase before the pandemic, but that only represented a small portion of the workforce.

How much did COVID-19 increase remote working?

A study by the Bureau of Labor Statistics found that 82% of all people who were employed did some or all of their work from home.

Other studies said that it was only 3%, and it went up to 40% during the pandemic. With these types of discrepancies, it is difficult to say how the exact impact of COVID-19 with any certainty.

Most studies do agree that the number of those working from home increased due to the pandemic.

One factor that could account for these differences is whether this only includes those employed in a traditional office setting or whether it includes the growing number of entrepreneurs in the nation.

What impact did COVID-19 have on remote working?

Even though it is difficult to quantify how many additional people are now working from home due to the pandemic, it is apparent that a shift has occurred in attitudes about working from home.

Many companies who once thought this was a bad idea, or that it was not possible, have now embraced the concept and are choosing it as a permanent option. Some companies found that they could save considerably in operating costs, salaries, and have increased productivity.

A large number of workers have found that they like working from home, and they now demand it as an option.

Compared to before COVID-19, 81% of survey respondents felt that their employer would support working from home, and 29% thought their company would support it more than before the pandemic.

Some companies will go back to the way things were before the pandemic and mandate that their workers return to the office, but many will embrace the new way of working and the needs of workers who have discovered a new way of looking at life and work.

Key Takeaway: The greatest change in the workforce because of the pandemic is a change in attitudes about the credibility of those who choose to work from home. Many employers were forced to make shifts and find a way to make it work.

Many of them found that it was an excellent option and plan to continue to allow it, and some now prefer it. Among workers, the changes are clear, and they found many benefits to working from home, including the ability to manage child and elder care, a better work-life balance, and greater levels of happiness.

Working from home was one of the biggest headlines during the pandemic.

We have already found that working from home was on the increase before the pandemic, but that only represented a small portion of the workforce.

How much did COVID-19 increase remote working?

A study by the Bureau of Labor Statistics found that 82% of all people who were employed did some or all of their work from home.

Other studies said that it was only 3%, and it went up to 40% during the pandemic. With these types of discrepancies, it is difficult to say how the exact impact of COVID-19 with any certainty.

Most studies do agree that the number of those working from home increased due to the pandemic.

One factor that could account for these differences is whether this only includes those employed in a traditional office setting or whether it includes the growing number of entrepreneurs in the nation.

What impact did COVID-19 have on remote working?

Even though it is difficult to quantify how many additional people are now working from home due to the pandemic, it is apparent that a shift has occurred in attitudes about working from home.

Many companies who once thought this was a bad idea, or that it was not possible, have now embraced the concept and are choosing it as a permanent option. Some companies found that they could save considerably in operating costs, salaries, and have increased productivity.

A large number of workers have found that they like working from home, and they now demand it as an option.

Compared to before COVID-19, 81% of survey respondents felt that their employer would support working from home, and 29% thought their company would support it more than before the pandemic.

Some companies will go back to the way things were before the pandemic and mandate that their workers return to the office, but many will embrace the new way of working and the needs of workers who have discovered a new way of looking at life and work.

Key Takeaway: The greatest change in the workforce because of the pandemic is a change in attitudes about the credibility of those who choose to work from home. Many employers were forced to make shifts and find a way to make it work.

Many of them found that it was an excellent option and plan to continue to allow it, and some now prefer it. Among workers, the changes are clear, and they found many benefits to working from home, including the ability to manage child and elder care, a better work-life balance, and greater levels of happiness.

Working from home was one of the biggest headlines during the pandemic.

We have already found that working from home was on the increase before the pandemic, but that only represented a small portion of the workforce.

How much did COVID-19 increase remote working?

A study by the Bureau of Labor Statistics found that 82% of all people who were employed did some or all of their work from home.

Other studies said that it was only 3%, and it went up to 40% during the pandemic. With these types of discrepancies, it is difficult to say how the exact impact of COVID-19 with any certainty.

Most studies do agree that the number of those working from home increased due to the pandemic.

One factor that could account for these differences is whether this only includes those employed in a traditional office setting or whether it includes the growing number of entrepreneurs in the nation.

What impact did COVID-19 have on remote working?

Even though it is difficult to quantify how many additional people are now working from home due to the pandemic, it is apparent that a shift has occurred in attitudes about working from home.

Many companies who once thought this was a bad idea, or that it was not possible, have now embraced the concept and are choosing it as a permanent option. Some companies found that they could save considerably in operating costs, salaries, and have increased productivity.

A large number of workers have found that they like working from home, and they now demand it as an option.

Compared to before COVID-19, 81% of survey respondents felt that their employer would support working from home, and 29% thought their company would support it more than before the pandemic.

Some companies will go back to the way things were before the pandemic and mandate that their workers return to the office, but many will embrace the new way of working and the needs of workers who have discovered a new way of looking at life and work.

Key Takeaway: The greatest change in the workforce because of the pandemic is a change in attitudes about the credibility of those who choose to work from home. Many employers were forced to make shifts and find a way to make it work.

Many of them found that it was an excellent option and plan to continue to allow it, and some now prefer it. Among workers, the changes are clear, and they found many benefits to working from home, including the ability to manage child and elder care, a better work-life balance, and greater levels of happiness.

Working from home was one of the biggest headlines during the pandemic.

We have already found that working from home was on the increase before the pandemic, but that only represented a small portion of the workforce.

How much did COVID-19 increase remote working?

A study by the Bureau of Labor Statistics found that 82% of all people who were employed did some or all of their work from home.

Other studies said that it was only 3%, and it went up to 40% during the pandemic. With these types of discrepancies, it is difficult to say how the exact impact of COVID-19 with any certainty.

Most studies do agree that the number of those working from home increased due to the pandemic.

One factor that could account for these differences is whether this only includes those employed in a traditional office setting or whether it includes the growing number of entrepreneurs in the nation.

What impact did COVID-19 have on remote working?

Even though it is difficult to quantify how many additional people are now working from home due to the pandemic, it is apparent that a shift has occurred in attitudes about working from home.

Many companies who once thought this was a bad idea, or that it was not possible, have now embraced the concept and are choosing it as a permanent option. Some companies found that they could save considerably in operating costs, salaries, and have increased productivity.

A large number of workers have found that they like working from home, and they now demand it as an option.

Compared to before COVID-19, 81% of survey respondents felt that their employer would support working from home, and 29% thought their company would support it more than before the pandemic.

Some companies will go back to the way things were before the pandemic and mandate that their workers return to the office, but many will embrace the new way of working and the needs of workers who have discovered a new way of looking at life and work.

Key Takeaway: The greatest change in the workforce because of the pandemic is a change in attitudes about the credibility of those who choose to work from home. Many employers were forced to make shifts and find a way to make it work.

Many of them found that it was an excellent option and plan to continue to allow it, and some now prefer it. Among workers, the changes are clear, and they found many benefits to working from home, including the ability to manage child and elder care, a better work-life balance, and greater levels of happiness.

Working from home was one of the biggest headlines during the pandemic.

We have already found that working from home was on the increase before the pandemic, but that only represented a small portion of the workforce.

How much did COVID-19 increase remote working?

A study by the Bureau of Labor Statistics found that 82% of all people who were employed did some or all of their work from home.

Other studies said that it was only 3%, and it went up to 40% during the pandemic. With these types of discrepancies, it is difficult to say how the exact impact of COVID-19 with any certainty.

Most studies do agree that the number of those working from home increased due to the pandemic.

One factor that could account for these differences is whether this only includes those employed in a traditional office setting or whether it includes the growing number of entrepreneurs in the nation.

What impact did COVID-19 have on remote working?

Even though it is difficult to quantify how many additional people are now working from home due to the pandemic, it is apparent that a shift has occurred in attitudes about working from home.

Many companies who once thought this was a bad idea, or that it was not possible, have now embraced the concept and are choosing it as a permanent option. Some companies found that they could save considerably in operating costs, salaries, and have increased productivity.

A large number of workers have found that they like working from home, and they now demand it as an option.

Compared to before COVID-19, 81% of survey respondents felt that their employer would support working from home, and 29% thought their company would support it more than before the pandemic.

Some companies will go back to the way things were before the pandemic and mandate that their workers return to the office, but many will embrace the new way of working and the needs of workers who have discovered a new way of looking at life and work.

Key Takeaway: The greatest change in the workforce because of the pandemic is a change in attitudes about the credibility of those who choose to work from home. Many employers were forced to make shifts and find a way to make it work.

Many of them found that it was an excellent option and plan to continue to allow it, and some now prefer it. Among workers, the changes are clear, and they found many benefits to working from home, including the ability to manage child and elder care, a better work-life balance, and greater levels of happiness.

Working from home was one of the biggest headlines during the pandemic.

We have already found that working from home was on the increase before the pandemic, but that only represented a small portion of the workforce.

How much did COVID-19 increase remote working?

A study by the Bureau of Labor Statistics found that 82% of all people who were employed did some or all of their work from home.

Other studies said that it was only 3%, and it went up to 40% during the pandemic. With these types of discrepancies, it is difficult to say how the exact impact of COVID-19 with any certainty.

Most studies do agree that the number of those working from home increased due to the pandemic.

One factor that could account for these differences is whether this only includes those employed in a traditional office setting or whether it includes the growing number of entrepreneurs in the nation.

What impact did COVID-19 have on remote working?

Even though it is difficult to quantify how many additional people are now working from home due to the pandemic, it is apparent that a shift has occurred in attitudes about working from home.

Many companies who once thought this was a bad idea, or that it was not possible, have now embraced the concept and are choosing it as a permanent option. Some companies found that they could save considerably in operating costs, salaries, and have increased productivity.

A large number of workers have found that they like working from home, and they now demand it as an option.

Compared to before COVID-19, 81% of survey respondents felt that their employer would support working from home, and 29% thought their company would support it more than before the pandemic.

Some companies will go back to the way things were before the pandemic and mandate that their workers return to the office, but many will embrace the new way of working and the needs of workers who have discovered a new way of looking at life and work.

Key Takeaway: The greatest change in the workforce because of the pandemic is a change in attitudes about the credibility of those who choose to work from home. Many employers were forced to make shifts and find a way to make it work.

Many of them found that it was an excellent option and plan to continue to allow it, and some now prefer it. Among workers, the changes are clear, and they found many benefits to working from home, including the ability to manage child and elder care, a better work-life balance, and greater levels of happiness.

Working from home was one of the biggest headlines during the pandemic.

We have already found that working from home was on the increase before the pandemic, but that only represented a small portion of the workforce.

How much did COVID-19 increase remote working?

A study by the Bureau of Labor Statistics found that 82% of all people who were employed did some or all of their work from home.

Other studies said that it was only 3%, and it went up to 40% during the pandemic. With these types of discrepancies, it is difficult to say how the exact impact of COVID-19 with any certainty.

Most studies do agree that the number of those working from home increased due to the pandemic.

One factor that could account for these differences is whether this only includes those employed in a traditional office setting or whether it includes the growing number of entrepreneurs in the nation.

What impact did COVID-19 have on remote working?

Even though it is difficult to quantify how many additional people are now working from home due to the pandemic, it is apparent that a shift has occurred in attitudes about working from home.

Many companies who once thought this was a bad idea, or that it was not possible, have now embraced the concept and are choosing it as a permanent option. Some companies found that they could save considerably in operating costs, salaries, and have increased productivity.

A large number of workers have found that they like working from home, and they now demand it as an option.

Compared to before COVID-19, 81% of survey respondents felt that their employer would support working from home, and 29% thought their company would support it more than before the pandemic.

Some companies will go back to the way things were before the pandemic and mandate that their workers return to the office, but many will embrace the new way of working and the needs of workers who have discovered a new way of looking at life and work.

Key Takeaway: The greatest change in the workforce because of the pandemic is a change in attitudes about the credibility of those who choose to work from home. Many employers were forced to make shifts and find a way to make it work.

Many of them found that it was an excellent option and plan to continue to allow it, and some now prefer it. Among workers, the changes are clear, and they found many benefits to working from home, including the ability to manage child and elder care, a better work-life balance, and greater levels of happiness.

Working from home was one of the biggest headlines during the pandemic.

We have already found that working from home was on the increase before the pandemic, but that only represented a small portion of the workforce.

How much did COVID-19 increase remote working?

A study by the Bureau of Labor Statistics found that 82% of all people who were employed did some or all of their work from home.

Other studies said that it was only 3%, and it went up to 40% during the pandemic. With these types of discrepancies, it is difficult to say how the exact impact of COVID-19 with any certainty.

Most studies do agree that the number of those working from home increased due to the pandemic.

One factor that could account for these differences is whether this only includes those employed in a traditional office setting or whether it includes the growing number of entrepreneurs in the nation.

What impact did COVID-19 have on remote working?

Even though it is difficult to quantify how many additional people are now working from home due to the pandemic, it is apparent that a shift has occurred in attitudes about working from home.

Many companies who once thought this was a bad idea, or that it was not possible, have now embraced the concept and are choosing it as a permanent option. Some companies found that they could save considerably in operating costs, salaries, and have increased productivity.

A large number of workers have found that they like working from home, and they now demand it as an option.

Compared to before COVID-19, 81% of survey respondents felt that their employer would support working from home, and 29% thought their company would support it more than before the pandemic.

Some companies will go back to the way things were before the pandemic and mandate that their workers return to the office, but many will embrace the new way of working and the needs of workers who have discovered a new way of looking at life and work.

Key Takeaway: The greatest change in the workforce because of the pandemic is a change in attitudes about the credibility of those who choose to work from home. Many employers were forced to make shifts and find a way to make it work.

Many of them found that it was an excellent option and plan to continue to allow it, and some now prefer it. Among workers, the changes are clear, and they found many benefits to working from home, including the ability to manage child and elder care, a better work-life balance, and greater levels of happiness.

Working from home was one of the biggest headlines during the pandemic.

We have already found that working from home was on the increase before the pandemic, but that only represented a small portion of the workforce.

How much did COVID-19 increase remote working?

A study by the Bureau of Labor Statistics found that 82% of all people who were employed did some or all of their work from home.

Other studies said that it was only 3%, and it went up to 40% during the pandemic. With these types of discrepancies, it is difficult to say how the exact impact of COVID-19 with any certainty.

Most studies do agree that the number of those working from home increased due to the pandemic.

One factor that could account for these differences is whether this only includes those employed in a traditional office setting or whether it includes the growing number of entrepreneurs in the nation.

What impact did COVID-19 have on remote working?

Even though it is difficult to quantify how many additional people are now working from home due to the pandemic, it is apparent that a shift has occurred in attitudes about working from home.

Many companies who once thought this was a bad idea, or that it was not possible, have now embraced the concept and are choosing it as a permanent option. Some companies found that they could save considerably in operating costs, salaries, and have increased productivity.

A large number of workers have found that they like working from home, and they now demand it as an option.

Compared to before COVID-19, 81% of survey respondents felt that their employer would support working from home, and 29% thought their company would support it more than before the pandemic.

Some companies will go back to the way things were before the pandemic and mandate that their workers return to the office, but many will embrace the new way of working and the needs of workers who have discovered a new way of looking at life and work.

Key Takeaway: The greatest change in the workforce because of the pandemic is a change in attitudes about the credibility of those who choose to work from home. Many employers were forced to make shifts and find a way to make it work.

Many of them found that it was an excellent option and plan to continue to allow it, and some now prefer it. Among workers, the changes are clear, and they found many benefits to working from home, including the ability to manage child and elder care, a better work-life balance, and greater levels of happiness.

Working from home was one of the biggest headlines during the pandemic.

We have already found that working from home was on the increase before the pandemic, but that only represented a small portion of the workforce.

How much did COVID-19 increase remote working?

A study by the Bureau of Labor Statistics found that 82% of all people who were employed did some or all of their work from home.

Other studies said that it was only 3%, and it went up to 40% during the pandemic. With these types of discrepancies, it is difficult to say how the exact impact of COVID-19 with any certainty.

Most studies do agree that the number of those working from home increased due to the pandemic.

One factor that could account for these differences is whether this only includes those employed in a traditional office setting or whether it includes the growing number of entrepreneurs in the nation.

What impact did COVID-19 have on remote working?

Even though it is difficult to quantify how many additional people are now working from home due to the pandemic, it is apparent that a shift has occurred in attitudes about working from home.

Many companies who once thought this was a bad idea, or that it was not possible, have now embraced the concept and are choosing it as a permanent option. Some companies found that they could save considerably in operating costs, salaries, and have increased productivity.

A large number of workers have found that they like working from home, and they now demand it as an option.

Compared to before COVID-19, 81% of survey respondents felt that their employer would support working from home, and 29% thought their company would support it more than before the pandemic.

Some companies will go back to the way things were before the pandemic and mandate that their workers return to the office, but many will embrace the new way of working and the needs of workers who have discovered a new way of looking at life and work.

Key Takeaway: The greatest change in the workforce because of the pandemic is a change in attitudes about the credibility of those who choose to work from home. Many employers were forced to make shifts and find a way to make it work.

Many of them found that it was an excellent option and plan to continue to allow it, and some now prefer it. Among workers, the changes are clear, and they found many benefits to working from home, including the ability to manage child and elder care, a better work-life balance, and greater levels of happiness.

Working from home was one of the biggest headlines during the pandemic.

We have already found that working from home was on the increase before the pandemic, but that only represented a small portion of the workforce.

How much did COVID-19 increase remote working?

A study by the Bureau of Labor Statistics found that 82% of all people who were employed did some or all of their work from home.

Other studies said that it was only 3%, and it went up to 40% during the pandemic. With these types of discrepancies, it is difficult to say how the exact impact of COVID-19 with any certainty.

Most studies do agree that the number of those working from home increased due to the pandemic.

One factor that could account for these differences is whether this only includes those employed in a traditional office setting or whether it includes the growing number of entrepreneurs in the nation.

What impact did COVID-19 have on remote working?

Even though it is difficult to quantify how many additional people are now working from home due to the pandemic, it is apparent that a shift has occurred in attitudes about working from home.

Many companies who once thought this was a bad idea, or that it was not possible, have now embraced the concept and are choosing it as a permanent option. Some companies found that they could save considerably in operating costs, salaries, and have increased productivity.

A large number of workers have found that they like working from home, and they now demand it as an option.

Compared to before COVID-19, 81% of survey respondents felt that their employer would support working from home, and 29% thought their company would support it more than before the pandemic.

Some companies will go back to the way things were before the pandemic and mandate that their workers return to the office, but many will embrace the new way of working and the needs of workers who have discovered a new way of looking at life and work.

Key Takeaway: The greatest change in the workforce because of the pandemic is a change in attitudes about the credibility of those who choose to work from home. Many employers were forced to make shifts and find a way to make it work.

Many of them found that it was an excellent option and plan to continue to allow it, and some now prefer it. Among workers, the changes are clear, and they found many benefits to working from home, including the ability to manage child and elder care, a better work-life balance, and greater levels of happiness.

Working from home was one of the biggest headlines during the pandemic.

We have already found that working from home was on the increase before the pandemic, but that only represented a small portion of the workforce.

How much did COVID-19 increase remote working?

A study by the Bureau of Labor Statistics found that 82% of all people who were employed did some or all of their work from home.

Other studies said that it was only 3%, and it went up to 40% during the pandemic. With these types of discrepancies, it is difficult to say how the exact impact of COVID-19 with any certainty.

Most studies do agree that the number of those working from home increased due to the pandemic.

One factor that could account for these differences is whether this only includes those employed in a traditional office setting or whether it includes the growing number of entrepreneurs in the nation.

What impact did COVID-19 have on remote working?

Even though it is difficult to quantify how many additional people are now working from home due to the pandemic, it is apparent that a shift has occurred in attitudes about working from home.

Many companies who once thought this was a bad idea, or that it was not possible, have now embraced the concept and are choosing it as a permanent option. Some companies found that they could save considerably in operating costs, salaries, and have increased productivity.

A large number of workers have found that they like working from home, and they now demand it as an option.

Compared to before COVID-19, 81% of survey respondents felt that their employer would support working from home, and 29% thought their company would support it more than before the pandemic.

Some companies will go back to the way things were before the pandemic and mandate that their workers return to the office, but many will embrace the new way of working and the needs of workers who have discovered a new way of looking at life and work.

Key Takeaway: The greatest change in the workforce because of the pandemic is a change in attitudes about the credibility of those who choose to work from home. Many employers were forced to make shifts and find a way to make it work.

Many of them found that it was an excellent option and plan to continue to allow it, and some now prefer it. Among workers, the changes are clear, and they found many benefits to working from home, including the ability to manage child and elder care, a better work-life balance, and greater levels of happiness.

Working from home was one of the biggest headlines during the pandemic.

We have already found that working from home was on the increase before the pandemic, but that only represented a small portion of the workforce.

How much did COVID-19 increase remote working?

A study by the Bureau of Labor Statistics found that 82% of all people who were employed did some or all of their work from home.

Other studies said that it was only 3%, and it went up to 40% during the pandemic. With these types of discrepancies, it is difficult to say how the exact impact of COVID-19 with any certainty.

Most studies do agree that the number of those working from home increased due to the pandemic.

One factor that could account for these differences is whether this only includes those employed in a traditional office setting or whether it includes the growing number of entrepreneurs in the nation.

What impact did COVID-19 have on remote working?

Even though it is difficult to quantify how many additional people are now working from home due to the pandemic, it is apparent that a shift has occurred in attitudes about working from home.

Many companies who once thought this was a bad idea, or that it was not possible, have now embraced the concept and are choosing it as a permanent option. Some companies found that they could save considerably in operating costs, salaries, and have increased productivity.

A large number of workers have found that they like working from home, and they now demand it as an option.

Compared to before COVID-19, 81% of survey respondents felt that their employer would support working from home, and 29% thought their company would support it more than before the pandemic.

Some companies will go back to the way things were before the pandemic and mandate that their workers return to the office, but many will embrace the new way of working and the needs of workers who have discovered a new way of looking at life and work.

Key Takeaway: The greatest change in the workforce because of the pandemic is a change in attitudes about the credibility of those who choose to work from home. Many employers were forced to make shifts and find a way to make it work.

Many of them found that it was an excellent option and plan to continue to allow it, and some now prefer it. Among workers, the changes are clear, and they found many benefits to working from home, including the ability to manage child and elder care, a better work-life balance, and greater levels of happiness.

Working from home was one of the biggest headlines during the pandemic.

We have already found that working from home was on the increase before the pandemic, but that only represented a small portion of the workforce.

How much did COVID-19 increase remote working?

A study by the Bureau of Labor Statistics found that 82% of all people who were employed did some or all of their work from home.

Other studies said that it was only 3%, and it went up to 40% during the pandemic. With these types of discrepancies, it is difficult to say how the exact impact of COVID-19 with any certainty.

Most studies do agree that the number of those working from home increased due to the pandemic.

One factor that could account for these differences is whether this only includes those employed in a traditional office setting or whether it includes the growing number of entrepreneurs in the nation.

What impact did COVID-19 have on remote working?

Even though it is difficult to quantify how many additional people are now working from home due to the pandemic, it is apparent that a shift has occurred in attitudes about working from home.

Many companies who once thought this was a bad idea, or that it was not possible, have now embraced the concept and are choosing it as a permanent option. Some companies found that they could save considerably in operating costs, salaries, and have increased productivity.

A large number of workers have found that they like working from home, and they now demand it as an option.

Compared to before COVID-19, 81% of survey respondents felt that their employer would support working from home, and 29% thought their company would support it more than before the pandemic.

Some companies will go back to the way things were before the pandemic and mandate that their workers return to the office, but many will embrace the new way of working and the needs of workers who have discovered a new way of looking at life and work.

Key Takeaway: The greatest change in the workforce because of the pandemic is a change in attitudes about the credibility of those who choose to work from home. Many employers were forced to make shifts and find a way to make it work.

Many of them found that it was an excellent option and plan to continue to allow it, and some now prefer it. Among workers, the changes are clear, and they found many benefits to working from home, including the ability to manage child and elder care, a better work-life balance, and greater levels of happiness.

Working from home was one of the biggest headlines during the pandemic.

We have already found that working from home was on the increase before the pandemic, but that only represented a small portion of the workforce.

How much did COVID-19 increase remote working?

A study by the Bureau of Labor Statistics found that 82% of all people who were employed did some or all of their work from home.

Other studies said that it was only 3%, and it went up to 40% during the pandemic. With these types of discrepancies, it is difficult to say how the exact impact of COVID-19 with any certainty.

Most studies do agree that the number of those working from home increased due to the pandemic.

One factor that could account for these differences is whether this only includes those employed in a traditional office setting or whether it includes the growing number of entrepreneurs in the nation.

What impact did COVID-19 have on remote working?

Even though it is difficult to quantify how many additional people are now working from home due to the pandemic, it is apparent that a shift has occurred in attitudes about working from home.

Many companies who once thought this was a bad idea, or that it was not possible, have now embraced the concept and are choosing it as a permanent option. Some companies found that they could save considerably in operating costs, salaries, and have increased productivity.

A large number of workers have found that they like working from home, and they now demand it as an option.

Compared to before COVID-19, 81% of survey respondents felt that their employer would support working from home, and 29% thought their company would support it more than before the pandemic.

Some companies will go back to the way things were before the pandemic and mandate that their workers return to the office, but many will embrace the new way of working and the needs of workers who have discovered a new way of looking at life and work.

Key Takeaway: The greatest change in the workforce because of the pandemic is a change in attitudes about the credibility of those who choose to work from home. Many employers were forced to make shifts and find a way to make it work.

Many of them found that it was an excellent option and plan to continue to allow it, and some now prefer it. Among workers, the changes are clear, and they found many benefits to working from home, including the ability to manage child and elder care, a better work-life balance, and greater levels of happiness.

Working from home was one of the biggest headlines during the pandemic.

We have already found that working from home was on the increase before the pandemic, but that only represented a small portion of the workforce.

How much did COVID-19 increase remote working?

A study by the Bureau of Labor Statistics found that 82% of all people who were employed did some or all of their work from home.

Other studies said that it was only 3%, and it went up to 40% during the pandemic. With these types of discrepancies, it is difficult to say how the exact impact of COVID-19 with any certainty.

Most studies do agree that the number of those working from home increased due to the pandemic.

One factor that could account for these differences is whether this only includes those employed in a traditional office setting or whether it includes the growing number of entrepreneurs in the nation.

What impact did COVID-19 have on remote working?

Even though it is difficult to quantify how many additional people are now working from home due to the pandemic, it is apparent that a shift has occurred in attitudes about working from home.

Many companies who once thought this was a bad idea, or that it was not possible, have now embraced the concept and are choosing it as a permanent option. Some companies found that they could save considerably in operating costs, salaries, and have increased productivity.

A large number of workers have found that they like working from home, and they now demand it as an option.

Compared to before COVID-19, 81% of survey respondents felt that their employer would support working from home, and 29% thought their company would support it more than before the pandemic.

Some companies will go back to the way things were before the pandemic and mandate that their workers return to the office, but many will embrace the new way of working and the needs of workers who have discovered a new way of looking at life and work.

Key Takeaway: The greatest change in the workforce because of the pandemic is a change in attitudes about the credibility of those who choose to work from home. Many employers were forced to make shifts and find a way to make it work.

Many of them found that it was an excellent option and plan to continue to allow it, and some now prefer it. Among workers, the changes are clear, and they found many benefits to working from home, including the ability to manage child and elder care, a better work-life balance, and greater levels of happiness.

Working from home was one of the biggest headlines during the pandemic.

We have already found that working from home was on the increase before the pandemic, but that only represented a small portion of the workforce.

How much did COVID-19 increase remote working?

A study by the Bureau of Labor Statistics found that 82% of all people who were employed did some or all of their work from home.

Other studies said that it was only 3%, and it went up to 40% during the pandemic. With these types of discrepancies, it is difficult to say how the exact impact of COVID-19 with any certainty.

Most studies do agree that the number of those working from home increased due to the pandemic.

One factor that could account for these differences is whether this only includes those employed in a traditional office setting or whether it includes the growing number of entrepreneurs in the nation.

What impact did COVID-19 have on remote working?

Even though it is difficult to quantify how many additional people are now working from home due to the pandemic, it is apparent that a shift has occurred in attitudes about working from home.

Many companies who once thought this was a bad idea, or that it was not possible, have now embraced the concept and are choosing it as a permanent option. Some companies found that they could save considerably in operating costs, salaries, and have increased productivity.

A large number of workers have found that they like working from home, and they now demand it as an option.

Compared to before COVID-19, 81% of survey respondents felt that their employer would support working from home, and 29% thought their company would support it more than before the pandemic.

Some companies will go back to the way things were before the pandemic and mandate that their workers return to the office, but many will embrace the new way of working and the needs of workers who have discovered a new way of looking at life and work.

Key Takeaway: The greatest change in the workforce because of the pandemic is a change in attitudes about the credibility of those who choose to work from home. Many employers were forced to make shifts and find a way to make it work.

Many of them found that it was an excellent option and plan to continue to allow it, and some now prefer it. Among workers, the changes are clear, and they found many benefits to working from home, including the ability to manage child and elder care, a better work-life balance, and greater levels of happiness.

Working from home was one of the biggest headlines during the pandemic.

We have already found that working from home was on the increase before the pandemic, but that only represented a small portion of the workforce.

How much did COVID-19 increase remote working?

A study by the Bureau of Labor Statistics found that 82% of all people who were employed did some or all of their work from home.

Other studies said that it was only 3%, and it went up to 40% during the pandemic. With these types of discrepancies, it is difficult to say how the exact impact of COVID-19 with any certainty.

Most studies do agree that the number of those working from home increased due to the pandemic.

One factor that could account for these differences is whether this only includes those employed in a traditional office setting or whether it includes the growing number of entrepreneurs in the nation.

What impact did COVID-19 have on remote working?

Even though it is difficult to quantify how many additional people are now working from home due to the pandemic, it is apparent that a shift has occurred in attitudes about working from home.

Many companies who once thought this was a bad idea, or that it was not possible, have now embraced the concept and are choosing it as a permanent option. Some companies found that they could save considerably in operating costs, salaries, and have increased productivity.

A large number of workers have found that they like working from home, and they now demand it as an option.

Compared to before COVID-19, 81% of survey respondents felt that their employer would support working from home, and 29% thought their company would support it more than before the pandemic.

Some companies will go back to the way things were before the pandemic and mandate that their workers return to the office, but many will embrace the new way of working and the needs of workers who have discovered a new way of looking at life and work.

Key Takeaway: The greatest change in the workforce because of the pandemic is a change in attitudes about the credibility of those who choose to work from home. Many employers were forced to make shifts and find a way to make it work.

Many of them found that it was an excellent option and plan to continue to allow it, and some now prefer it. Among workers, the changes are clear, and they found many benefits to working from home, including the ability to manage child and elder care, a better work-life balance, and greater levels of happiness.

Working from home was one of the biggest headlines during the pandemic.

We have already found that working from home was on the increase before the pandemic, but that only represented a small portion of the workforce.

How much did COVID-19 increase remote working?

A study by the Bureau of Labor Statistics found that 82% of all people who were employed did some or all of their work from home.

Other studies said that it was only 3%, and it went up to 40% during the pandemic. With these types of discrepancies, it is difficult to say how the exact impact of COVID-19 with any certainty.

Most studies do agree that the number of those working from home increased due to the pandemic.

One factor that could account for these differences is whether this only includes those employed in a traditional office setting or whether it includes the growing number of entrepreneurs in the nation.

What impact did COVID-19 have on remote working?

Even though it is difficult to quantify how many additional people are now working from home due to the pandemic, it is apparent that a shift has occurred in attitudes about working from home.

Many companies who once thought this was a bad idea, or that it was not possible, have now embraced the concept and are choosing it as a permanent option. Some companies found that they could save considerably in operating costs, salaries, and have increased productivity.

A large number of workers have found that they like working from home, and they now demand it as an option.

Compared to before COVID-19, 81% of survey respondents felt that their employer would support working from home, and 29% thought their company would support it more than before the pandemic.

Some companies will go back to the way things were before the pandemic and mandate that their workers return to the office, but many will embrace the new way of working and the needs of workers who have discovered a new way of looking at life and work.

Key Takeaway: The greatest change in the workforce because of the pandemic is a change in attitudes about the credibility of those who choose to work from home. Many employers were forced to make shifts and find a way to make it work.

Many of them found that it was an excellent option and plan to continue to allow it, and some now prefer it. Among workers, the changes are clear, and they found many benefits to working from home, including the ability to manage child and elder care, a better work-life balance, and greater levels of happiness.

Working from home was one of the biggest headlines during the pandemic.

We have already found that working from home was on the increase before the pandemic, but that only represented a small portion of the workforce.

How much did COVID-19 increase remote working?

A study by the Bureau of Labor Statistics found that 82% of all people who were employed did some or all of their work from home.

Other studies said that it was only 3%, and it went up to 40% during the pandemic. With these types of discrepancies, it is difficult to say how the exact impact of COVID-19 with any certainty.

Most studies do agree that the number of those working from home increased due to the pandemic.

One factor that could account for these differences is whether this only includes those employed in a traditional office setting or whether it includes the growing number of entrepreneurs in the nation.

What impact did COVID-19 have on remote working?

Even though it is difficult to quantify how many additional people are now working from home due to the pandemic, it is apparent that a shift has occurred in attitudes about working from home.

Many companies who once thought this was a bad idea, or that it was not possible, have now embraced the concept and are choosing it as a permanent option. Some companies found that they could save considerably in operating costs, salaries, and have increased productivity.

A large number of workers have found that they like working from home, and they now demand it as an option.

Compared to before COVID-19, 81% of survey respondents felt that their employer would support working from home, and 29% thought their company would support it more than before the pandemic.

Some companies will go back to the way things were before the pandemic and mandate that their workers return to the office, but many will embrace the new way of working and the needs of workers who have discovered a new way of looking at life and work.

Key Takeaway: The greatest change in the workforce because of the pandemic is a change in attitudes about the credibility of those who choose to work from home. Many employers were forced to make shifts and find a way to make it work.

Many of them found that it was an excellent option and plan to continue to allow it, and some now prefer it. Among workers, the changes are clear, and they found many benefits to working from home, including the ability to manage child and elder care, a better work-life balance, and greater levels of happiness.

Working from home was one of the biggest headlines during the pandemic.

We have already found that working from home was on the increase before the pandemic, but that only represented a small portion of the workforce.

How much did COVID-19 increase remote working?

A study by the Bureau of Labor Statistics found that 82% of all people who were employed did some or all of their work from home.

Other studies said that it was only 3%, and it went up to 40% during the pandemic. With these types of discrepancies, it is difficult to say how the exact impact of COVID-19 with any certainty.

Most studies do agree that the number of those working from home increased due to the pandemic.

One factor that could account for these differences is whether this only includes those employed in a traditional office setting or whether it includes the growing number of entrepreneurs in the nation.

What impact did COVID-19 have on remote working?

Even though it is difficult to quantify how many additional people are now working from home due to the pandemic, it is apparent that a shift has occurred in attitudes about working from home.

Many companies who once thought this was a bad idea, or that it was not possible, have now embraced the concept and are choosing it as a permanent option. Some companies found that they could save considerably in operating costs, salaries, and have increased productivity.

A large number of workers have found that they like working from home, and they now demand it as an option.

Compared to before COVID-19, 81% of survey respondents felt that their employer would support working from home, and 29% thought their company would support it more than before the pandemic.

Some companies will go back to the way things were before the pandemic and mandate that their workers return to the office, but many will embrace the new way of working and the needs of workers who have discovered a new way of looking at life and work.

Key Takeaway: The greatest change in the workforce because of the pandemic is a change in attitudes about the credibility of those who choose to work from home. Many employers were forced to make shifts and find a way to make it work.

Many of them found that it was an excellent option and plan to continue to allow it, and some now prefer it. Among workers, the changes are clear, and they found many benefits to working from home, including the ability to manage child and elder care, a better work-life balance, and greater levels of happiness.

Conclusion

That is it for my list of work from home productivity statistics.

As a remote worker myself, I enjoyed finding out about these statistics and trends and compiling them for you.

If you have any questions, please feel free to email us at [email protected]

That is it for my list of work from home productivity statistics.

As a remote worker myself, I enjoyed finding out about these statistics and trends and compiling them for you.

If you have any questions, please feel free to email us at [email protected]

That is it for my list of work from home productivity statistics.

As a remote worker myself, I enjoyed finding out about these statistics and trends and compiling them for you.

If you have any questions, please feel free to email us at [email protected]

That is it for my list of work from home productivity statistics.

As a remote worker myself, I enjoyed finding out about these statistics and trends and compiling them for you.

If you have any questions, please feel free to email us at [email protected]

That is it for my list of work from home productivity statistics.

As a remote worker myself, I enjoyed finding out about these statistics and trends and compiling them for you.

If you have any questions, please feel free to email us at [email protected]

That is it for my list of work from home productivity statistics.

As a remote worker myself, I enjoyed finding out about these statistics and trends and compiling them for you.

If you have any questions, please feel free to email us at [email protected]

That is it for my list of work from home productivity statistics.

As a remote worker myself, I enjoyed finding out about these statistics and trends and compiling them for you.

If you have any questions, please feel free to email us at [email protected]

That is it for my list of work from home productivity statistics.

As a remote worker myself, I enjoyed finding out about these statistics and trends and compiling them for you.

If you have any questions, please feel free to email us at [email protected]

That is it for my list of work from home productivity statistics.

As a remote worker myself, I enjoyed finding out about these statistics and trends and compiling them for you.

If you have any questions, please feel free to email us at [email protected]

That is it for my list of work from home productivity statistics.

As a remote worker myself, I enjoyed finding out about these statistics and trends and compiling them for you.

If you have any questions, please feel free to email us at [email protected]

That is it for my list of work from home productivity statistics.

As a remote worker myself, I enjoyed finding out about these statistics and trends and compiling them for you.

If you have any questions, please feel free to email us at [email protected]

That is it for my list of work from home productivity statistics.

As a remote worker myself, I enjoyed finding out about these statistics and trends and compiling them for you.

If you have any questions, please feel free to email us at [email protected]

That is it for my list of work from home productivity statistics.

As a remote worker myself, I enjoyed finding out about these statistics and trends and compiling them for you.

If you have any questions, please feel free to email us at [email protected]

That is it for my list of work from home productivity statistics.

As a remote worker myself, I enjoyed finding out about these statistics and trends and compiling them for you.

If you have any questions, please feel free to email us at [email protected]

That is it for my list of work from home productivity statistics.

As a remote worker myself, I enjoyed finding out about these statistics and trends and compiling them for you.

If you have any questions, please feel free to email us at [email protected]

That is it for my list of work from home productivity statistics.

As a remote worker myself, I enjoyed finding out about these statistics and trends and compiling them for you.

If you have any questions, please feel free to email us at [email protected]

That is it for my list of work from home productivity statistics.

As a remote worker myself, I enjoyed finding out about these statistics and trends and compiling them for you.

If you have any questions, please feel free to email us at [email protected]

That is it for my list of work from home productivity statistics.

As a remote worker myself, I enjoyed finding out about these statistics and trends and compiling them for you.

If you have any questions, please feel free to email us at [email protected]

That is it for my list of work from home productivity statistics.

As a remote worker myself, I enjoyed finding out about these statistics and trends and compiling them for you.

If you have any questions, please feel free to email us at [email protected]

That is it for my list of work from home productivity statistics.

As a remote worker myself, I enjoyed finding out about these statistics and trends and compiling them for you.

If you have any questions, please feel free to email us at [email protected]

That is it for my list of work from home productivity statistics.

As a remote worker myself, I enjoyed finding out about these statistics and trends and compiling them for you.

If you have any questions, please feel free to email us at [email protected]

That is it for my list of work from home productivity statistics.

As a remote worker myself, I enjoyed finding out about these statistics and trends and compiling them for you.

If you have any questions, please feel free to email us at [email protected]

That is it for my list of work from home productivity statistics.

As a remote worker myself, I enjoyed finding out about these statistics and trends and compiling them for you.

If you have any questions, please feel free to email us at [email protected]

That is it for my list of work from home productivity statistics.

As a remote worker myself, I enjoyed finding out about these statistics and trends and compiling them for you.

If you have any questions, please feel free to email us at [email protected]

That is it for my list of work from home productivity statistics.

As a remote worker myself, I enjoyed finding out about these statistics and trends and compiling them for you.

If you have any questions, please feel free to email us at [email protected]